• Mar 6, 2011
Ferrari's 2011 F1 car was originally unveiled as the Ferrari F150 - a hat tip to the 150th anniversary of Italy's unification. That got Ford's boxers in a knot, as Uncle Henry's boys feared that its customers would get confused by the name similarities with the Ford F-150 pickup.
Ferrari grudgingly obliged FoMoCo, and changed the car's name to the Ferrari F150th Italia. Ford liked that, and declared the matter settled. Ferrari, however wasn't done. Still galled that they had to change the name of the racer in the first place, they decided to make one final change to get it just the way they want it.

Now, Ferrari's 2011 Formula 1 effort will be called the Ferrari F150° Italia. The added symbol is the Italian equivalent of the English "th" suffix, and Ferrari added it to give the name more Italian flair. Maranello announced the move in a biting, sarcastic news release saying, "...Therefore the name will now read as the Ferrari 150° Italia, which should make it clear even to the thickest of people that the name of the car is a tribute to the anniversary of the unification of our country.

"Let's hope the matter is now definitely closed and that we can concentrate on more serious matters, namely ensuring that our car that already seems to be pretty good out of the box, becomes a real winner." Thanks for the tip, mcman!

[Source: Autosport, Ferrari]

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The Horse Whisperer
The name changes but not the sense


It might seem like a Kafkaesque scenario, but the affair relating to the name of the car with which Fernando Alonso and Felipe Massa will tackle this year's Formula 1 World Championship saw its final and decisive episode played out these past few days with the concomitant withdrawal by Ford of the summons.

Therefore common sense has prevailed. In order to avoid the slightest risk of anyone confusing a Formula 1 car with a pick-up truck, for their part, the men from Maranello have decided that the car will lose the F that precedes the number 150 and which stands for Ferrari, as it has done on numerous occasions when it's come to giving a car a code name, be it for the race track or the road. It appears that this could have caused so much confusion in the minds of the consumer across the Pond that, at the same time as losing the F, the name will be completely Italianised, replacing the English "th" with the equivalent Italian symbol.

Therefore the name will now read as the Ferrari 150° Italia, which should make it clear even to the thickest of people that the name of the car is a tribute to the anniversary of the unification of our country. Let's hope the matter is now definitely closed and that we can concentrate on more serious matters, namely ensuring that our car that already seems to be pretty good out of the box, becomes a real winner.


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  • 54 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ford should name their next car the Enzo, and when Ferarri bitches tell them to pound sand. Way to show some class, Ferrari.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Or perhaps Ford should name the next F-150 SVT the Enzo° or the F-Enzo°. Maybe that might OfFEnzo Ferrari.
      Joe
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have to say I would have answered the same way, how do you confuse an F1 car with a Truck , other than they have 4 wheels and a steering wheel.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Joe
        The same way that the owners of Formula One would have significant heartburn if Ford decided to use their own historically-significant F-1 nomenclature on a compact pickup truck (F-1 was the original F-series but Ford never stood up for the nomenclature and have, surely, lost the right to use it, squatters' rights being what they are).
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Joe
        It's a matter of legally protecting a copyright and not allowing a precedence to be set. If Ford didn't protect F150 against Ferrari, there would be nothing they could do to stop a Chinese carmaker (or anyone) from using Mustang, or Taurus, or any other Ford-protected name. They have to protect every copyright from every infringement.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Joe
        Well Joe, it's not hard to confuse a ford pick up driver, eeehaww.
      • 3 Years Ago
      There's still room for confusion. After all, Alain Prost said that his Ferrari F1 car handled like a truck.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why not just name it the Ferrari LinguiniSpaghettiMostaccioliFettuciniSpicyMeataballaF1. Id rock the shirt. ;-)
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's hot.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Now, Ferrari's 2011 Formula 1 effort will be called the Ferrari F150° Italia. Ok, I think the added symbol is the Italian equivalent of the English "sucks" suffix, and Ferrari added it to give the name more Italian flair... Right?!!!
      • 3 Years Ago
      why are people still comparing ford to ferrari even when it comes to car names...come on now
      • 3 Years Ago
      "We're still whiny babies! Quick! Luigi, make another American jump through some hoops to buy one of our cars!"
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is such a ridiculous controversy. I'm well aware of the old Ferrari/Ford feud, but damn, get over it. We're talking an American pickup versus an F1 car. It's a non-issue.
        • 3 Years Ago
        How many times does it need repeated?

        This is not about the vehicles this is about the F-150 trademark, if Ford doesn't try to protect they could lose it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        In terms of trademark law they are the same thing. Class 12: Vehicles for locomotion by land, air, or water. It wouldn't matter if it was a container ship. Ford would still have to protect it or they would lose it. Trademark law doesn't differentiate.
        • 3 Years Ago
        It bears repeating that this is not the first time Ford has moved to protect not just the specific F-150 nomenclature but the pattern. Ever wonder why the other Big 3 both use 1500 for half ton pickup designations? Could be the threat of action by Ford. When the second generation Toyota T-100 gained a V8, Toyota wanted to call it the T-150 to reflect it's gain in spec but this was close enough that Ford moved to prevent it and, hence, Toyota changed it to Tundra. Yes, the same vehicle type, I understand, but if Ford doesn't protect F-150 from other products (regardless of how far-removed they might seem to be from the pickup truck), their claim to it becomes diluted and competitors like Toyota eventually have a much easier time mimicking the pattern, if not using this exact nomenclature.

        Put another way, let's look at Ford's experience with their attempt to re-introduce the GT40 earlier this decade (a product whose history has ironic links to their relationship with Ferrari). It's true that the original wasn't officially known as the GT40 but it became the popularly-known name for it, enough that a replica builder bought the trademark and blocked Ford from using it on the revival model. (I'd previously crossed anecdotes by attributing it to a tire manufacturer, which brings me to the next anecdote...)

        Ford originally intended to use Futura on the Fusion but was blocked when Pep Boys sued over the use of the name, despite the fact that Ford had occasionally, over at least 40 years, used this name for a midsize model. Didn't matter... they had effectively vacated it by not defending it and lost the rights.
      • 3 Years Ago
      How many shoppers are really going to confuse a state of the art Italian sports car with a 1/2 ton pickup truck?
        • 3 Years Ago
        It's not about confusing a pickup with a Ferrari F1 racecar. It's about not setting a precedent that might result in Ford losing exclusive, protected intellectual property rights to "F-150"... as they most definitely did lose with F-1, the original F-series pickup. They could never use that historically significant nomenclature again, for very obvious reasons.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't know about you guys, but I can't tell the difference between a Ferrari and a Ford truck. Even if I'm right next to one, I can't tell them apart. Could you imagine being at a nice restaurant, and telling the valet to bring your F150 around; he does it, you get in, and only because the radio presets are different, you exclaim, "oh my gosh, I accidentally took someone's ferrari!". Good thing Ford intervened. Otherwise, we might have people mixing up the two constantly.
      • 3 Years Ago
      ROTF,LMAO! F150 degrees? I bet Schumy is laughing his a** off too.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am so relieved! I was at Fiorano Modenese at the end of January and I was totally confused and could not tell if the four cars being tested on the straight line behind the late Signora Ferrari's almond groves were those dime-a-dozen Ferraris or were those magnificent and legendary "Quality is Number One, We build them tough" Ford trucks assembled by hand in Valencia, Venezuela or Cualican, Mexico! Now with the label F-150 clearly indicating that those masterpieces of engineering that bear it are really Fords I am reassured that throughout the world people won't confuse them with those rustbuckets from Maranello.
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