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Toyota aims to launch its own line of electric vehicle chargers in 2012, according to the Japanese news outlet, Nikkei. Toyota Home, along with Toyota Industries Corporation, will jointly develop a pair of residential charging stations to be sold through the distribution channels of Toyota Home and its affiliate, Misawa Homes.
The Toyota Home brand will offer two chargers, an interior one designed for a garage and an exterior version you can install somewere a bit more exposed. The Nikkei report claims that:
The chargers will be compatible with non-Toyota cars, and will be priced between several tens of thousands of yen to 200,000 yen ($2,406 U.S. at the current exchange rate), including installation costs.
In regards to production volume, the Nikkei states that in 2012, Toyota "expects its sales of home battery chargers to reach 20,000 to 30,000 units."



Photos by Sebastian Blanco / Copyright ©2010 AOL

[Source: Nikkei – sub. req. via Green Car Congress]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am sure eventually you'll be able to buy the pieces to make the "charging station" (sealed box, wire, cord with standard EV plug head, breaker w/ground fault switch) at lowes for $200...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Care to substantiate your claim that Toyota is selling a $2400 extension chord? Toyota has released no further info on their device beyond what this article states. Your claim is based upon what you've read about the car, and it is a logical fallacy to infer that you understand the device based upon your undersanding of the car. Some more conditional language would be in order barring that you are an insider at Toyota.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Evan is correct, as long as Toyota uses the industry standard Level 2 charging platform (it's plug-in Prius prototypes that are driving around in California right now do use this - and public chargers being installed right now use it for the most part except for the Level 3 chargers), the charger (that actually throttles the amperage rate etc.) is in the car - because different cars need different charging preferences (rates etc.) and it makes alot more sense to put that right in the car instead of having a bunch of incompatible external chargers everwhere - amazing the industry got together and ironed that out beforehand...

        Toyota's pricing seems quite high (unless full blown installation is part of the package, which I wouldn't think it would be, but you never know) considering the pricing for other industry standard Level 2 chargers. Other level 2 chargers are often going for around $1500 at this point (without installation of course) with expectations that this will drop as time goes on since there isn't alot under the hood with a Level 2 charger.

        Well, even if it is overpriced its good to see Toyota is getting ready for what they have delayed jumping into for so long - the plug-in world.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The plug-in Prius is charged through a SAE-J1772 socket:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772#Compatible_vehicle_models

        A SAE-J1772 socket only supports Level 1 and 2 charging, which transfers "AC energy to the vehicle's on-board charger":
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Level_1,_2,_and_3_charging#Level_1.2C_2.2C_and_3_charging

        SAE-J1772 "home chargers" only require three significant components:
        1. A ground-fault interrupter (a type of circuit breaker) that interrupts power when a short is made with ground.
        2. A power relay that interrupts power when the plug is pulled out of the car.
        3. A very simple analog control signal that tells the car the maximum current rating of the unit.
        There is nowhere near $2400 worth of parts in there.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Both of your comments make sense to me, but still leaves that question open as to where the bulk of the $2400 is coming from. I'm assuming that this is based on a 240V system, but so's my washer/dryer. If this were Porsche, I would understand the overpriced part, but not Toyota. Something still seems unknown here.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm looking forward to a lot more competition bringing the price down of these things. Toyota are just seeing a nice opportunity for a few years, I think most ev early adopters should punish these rip offs when they've already committed to new expensive tech.
      harlanx6
      • 4 Years Ago
      Looks to me like the big T will be making more profit on their home charging apparatus than on their cars!
      • 4 Years Ago
      I would imagine this is more geared to their future small BEV. Even a 110 Volt charge should do fine for the plug-in Prius, so no-one is going to pay for this to plug one in.
      • 4 Years Ago
      These are not "chargers". The Level 1 and 2 battery charger is within the car. These are just extension cords with a ground-fault trip switch for safety.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Talk about putting the Cart before the horse. Hey Toyota how about getting a plug in vehicle on the road before selling extension cords for EV's. You guys had such a lead it's amazing how you let management piss it away.