• Feb 11, 2011
If it's good enough for Formula 1, it's good enough for NASCAR. Heck, if it's good enough for every single automobile sold in the United States for the past several decades, it's good enough for NASCAR. What's this newfangled techno-wizardry we're talking about? Fuel injection.

For the first time since the series kicked off in 1947, the so-called stock cars that travel full-throttle around tracks all across America will abandon their carburetors in favor of an Enging Control Unit sourced from McLaren and a computer processor from Freescale. That tandem reportedly beat out eight rival bids.

According to NASCAR Vice President of Competition Robin Pemberton, "This is a positive step that will provide greater fuel efficiency and a greener footprint while maintaining the same great competition that we have seen on the race track."

Fuel efficiency ought to go up, as will horsepower. Interestingly, NASCAR competitors like Ford and Toyota happy about the switch. "We think it's very important that both the cars and the technology in NASCAR are more closely related to production cars. The move to fuel injection is another important step in that process," said Jamie Allison, Director, Ford North America Motorsports.

NASCAR expects to have its fuel injection technology all sorted in time for the 2012 season opener, the Daytona 500.

[Source: National Speed Sport News, Fox Sports | Image: Reinhold Matay/AP]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 72 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Enging? Really?
        • 3 Years Ago
        Yeah, I think they need some new proofreaders. There was also at least one other flub in the article.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Seriously. I'm blind and I saw that.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well that's all good, but I think I'll stick with F1, thanks.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yes but can the cars still run on corn sqeezins with injectors?
      • 3 Years Ago
      "If it's good enough for Formula 1, it's good enough for NASCAR. Heck, if it's good enough for every single automobile sold in the United States for the past several decades, it's good enough for NASCAR. What's this newfangled techno-wizardry we're talking about? Fuel injection."

      Don't be an idiot. NASCAR are terrified of traction control. Electronics (and the rules to eliminate them) have basically killed motorsports so you can understand their plight. The difficulties of policing electronics are immense. It's a lot more work, and no benefit to the show.

      I'm not a fan of NASCAR, but fear of traction control and other electronic driver aids is legit. The art of driving has more or less been ruined by electronics.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Pyronick Traction control would also have a huge impact on starts and restarts.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Have you never seen someone have the rear end step out exiting a corner at a short track, leaving two black marks well over 50ft long? That's wheelspin, y'all. At over 120MPH. In fourth gear. HECK YES traction control would help.

        But at the cost of making it less exciting. Kinda like F1.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Fifty cars rubbing nose-to-tail at 180mph and traction control is not useful? A motorsport dependent entirely upon tuning the rear of the car (tight/loose) in order to improve exit speed cannot make use of traction control? I think you are mistaken.

        Furthemore, F1 didn't ban traction control. They used a spec ECU to ban a specific type of traction control--the type in which the ECU checks actual wheel speed with theoretical and then cuts the ignition if the actual value is too high. That version of traction control sounds horrible and it wastes fuel (Bernie hated the former, Max hated the latter). Modern F1 cars still have traction control, it's just a different style. The cars barely slide around in the wet.

        Watch onboard footage of the frontrunner and backmarkers. You'll see how late the backmarkers pick up the throttle. Part of that is certainly chassis design and the skill of the drivers, but an even bigger part is the modern engine management programs.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I don't think traction control would change anything in NASCAR. Except maybe when exiting the pitlane. Speeds rarely dip under 60 mph.

        The absence of traction control in Formula 1 hasn't changed much either. Maybe a few spins and a single crash in an entire season.

        I think the reintroduction of turbochargers in Formula 1 is one of the biggest game changers in years.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well then it's only a matter of time until they ditch the pushrod for an overhead cam. Shame, I always thought it was amazing that NASCAR is the only series that stuck with the same basic engine design as when it first started.

      It's all for the better, i guess
      • 3 Years Ago
      What is it about a NASCAR story on Autoblog that compels people to display their complete lack of knowledge of the series by posting condescending comments filled with technological innaccuracies?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Fuel injection in NASCAR should have happened during the last decade. The sport became so stagnant and really suffered. What did they manage last decade? The bigger, heavier, ill-handling "CoT" which in my opinion has killed much of the excitement.

      Hopefully fuel injection will lead them to one day [soon] running 100% Ethanol. Motorsports as a whole needs to break the addiction to petrol.

      I do have my criticisms of NASCAR, but I will also ALWAYS defend it from the idiots who claim there's "no skill involved" or "wuts so fun about turning left lololol" or "lol nascar...too dumb for technology...I'm so superior because I watch F1."

      Those lines of thought always come from ignorance or stupidity.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I heard a rumor that next year the cars will be getting trailer hitches.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Welcome to the 80's NASCAR.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can NASCAR please just go away? Forever. I can't stand that it's on ESPN and that SPEED has become an all-NASCAR channel under FOX. It's brainwashed millions of Americans into thinking that racing = dumb rednecks driving around in circles for 4 hours in boxes with no headlights or tail lights using 1950s technology.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Saddest part of it all is that the France Family owns Grand-AM but they don't push it. The one American racing series that they own that is based (if you will) off production cars they just let it wallow around.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Sad that Grand-Am gets pushed to the side. Grand-Am needs to be taken away from the Frances. Join Grand-Am back with ALMS (like before the split) and form a separate DTM/Super GT 2012 regulation touring car series to partner with. That plus a reunified IndyCar series might be enough to kill the beast. Only issue is, who would offer to buy out the France's stake in Grand-Am? It's not promoted at all and can't even have all its races shown live on NASCAR TV, er, SPEED. At least IndyCar looks like it's on the road to recovery.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Now if they can just get them to look as good as DTM, or Australian V8 supercars they will have another viewer.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Forgive my rulebook ignorance, but does this mean every team will use the same FI and ECU. Are they running the same carb in every car now? I figured if if there is a Ford racer, there would be a Ford racing solution to fuel delivery; Chevy with it's version or a team coming up with it's own home-built FI, their own suspension ideas, aero bits and on and on. Each car built to try and beat every other. If it's just a drivers' competition, how can you be rooting for a Chevy or Ford or whatever if they are all the same.
        • 3 Years Ago
        btw: that "technical innovation" will happen will happen even if all components are the same.
        • 3 Years Ago
        hashiryu: If there is a rule that establishes a technical boundary and it is exceeded, yes that's cheating. My point is why not have, for example, 10 teams come up with 10 different ways to reach that boundary rather than have one solution for all.
        • 3 Years Ago
        It's to limit "technical innovation" in some areas and improve it in others. For those unfamiliar with the racing world, it's called technical innovation until you are caught, then it' known as cheating.
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