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2011 Chevrolet Volt – Click above for high-res image gallery

Back in July of 2010, General Motors revealed that the 2011 Chevrolet Volt would be slapped with a base price of $41,000 (including a $720 destination charge, but excluding any plug-in vehicle incentives). While the Volt's price isn't as aggressive as some potential buyers had hoped for, its lease rate of $350 per month for 36 months is nearly identical to the deal offered on the Nissan Leaf.

Buyers willing to wait for the second-generation Volt to debut may see a price tag that's up to $7,500 less than the $41,000 sticker on the 2011 model. According to GM-Volt, The General expects that economies of scale, along with the possibility of reducing the size of the Volt's lithium-ion battery pack, could contribute to a $7,500 price reduction for GM's next-gen plug-in hybrid. GM spokesman Robert Peterson reiterated that the Volt's price will drop over time, stating:

As with any new technology - from plasma TVs to cell phones - the production costs lower with learnings gained with each generation. We expect to see similar cost savings, either through the development or improvement of technologies, or reduced production costs.

However, Peterson made no specific mention of a $7,500 price cut. At this time, that number seems to be a well-circulated rumor, rather than an actual target set by GM. If it's an actual target, it makes some sort of sense: the maximum federal tax credit is worth $7,500, and it is set to expire for GM after the automaker sells 200,000 qualified vehicles.


  • Bob Lutz, Vice Chairman
  • Bob Lutz, Vice Chairman
  • The Chevrolet Volt "Freedom Drive" across the country concludes at Pier 92 during the annual Macy's Independence Day fireworks display over the Hudson River in New York, Sunday, July 4, 2010. The "Freedom Drive" began four days and 1.776 miles ago in Austin, Texas where Chevrolet announced New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Texas would join Michigan, California and Washington, D.C. as launch sites for the Volt later this year. (Photo by Emile Wamsteker for Chevrolet)
  • The Chevrolet Volt "Freedom Drive" across the country concludes at Pier 92 during the annual Macy's Independence Day fireworks display over the Hudson River in New York, Sunday, July 4, 2010. The "Freedom Drive" began four days and 1.776 miles ago in Austin, Texas where Chevrolet announced New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Texas would join Michigan, California and Washington, D.C. as launch sites for the Volt later this year. (Photo by Emile Wamsteker for Chevrolet)
  • Chevrolet announces Thursday, July 1, 2010 it is adding Texas, New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to the launch markets for the Volt electric vehicle. The retail launch in Texas and New York will begin with Austin and New York City in late 2010. The balance of Texas and New York, as well as New Jersey and Connecticut, are scheduled to begin receiving Volts in early 2011. The Chevrolet Volt (pictured here) in front of the Texas State Capital in Austiin, Texas Wednesday, June 30, 2010. (Photo by Steven Noreyko for Chevrolet)
  • Chevrolet announces Thursday, July 1, 2010 it is adding Texas, New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to the launch markets for the Volt electric vehicle. The retail launch in Texas and New York will begin with Austin and New York City in late 2010. The balance of Texas and New York, as well as New Jersey and Connecticut, are scheduled to begin receiving Volts in early 2011. The Chevrolet Volt (pictured here) in front of the Texas State Capital in Austiin, Texas Wednesday, June 30, 2010. (Photo by Steven Noreyko for Chevrolet)
  • A pre-production Chevrolet Volt passes a trolley while navigating the steep climbs of the San Francisco Bay area while on an engineering development drive Saturday, April 25, 2010 in San Francisco, California The Volt will be available in California during the last quarter of 2010. (Photo by Martin Klimek for Chevrolet)
  • A pre-production Chevrolet Volt drives near the Golden Gate Bridge while on an engineering development drive in San Francisco, California Saturday, April 25, 2010. The Volt will be available in California during the last quarter of 2010. (Photo by Martin Klimek for Chevrolet)
  • A pre-production Chevrolet Volt navigates the steep climbs of the San Francisco Bay area while on an engineering development drive Saturday, April 25, 2010 in San Francisco, California The Volt will be available in California during the last quarter of 2010. (Photo by Martin Klimek for Chevrolet)
  • The new Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle with extended range on display at Columbia University on Earth Day, Thursday, April 22, 2010 in New York, NY. (Photo by Todd Plitt for Chevrolet)
  • The new Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle with extended range drives through campus at Columbia University on Earth Day, Thursday, April 22, 2010 in New York, NY. (Photo by Todd Plitt for Chevrolet)
  • The new Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle with extended range drives through campus at Columbia University on Earth Day, Thursday, April 22, 2010 in New York, NY. (Photo by Todd Plitt for Chevrolet)
  • The Chevrolet Volt �Freedom Drive� across the country continues in Fairfax, Virginia Saturday, July 3, 2010 as the Volt participates in the annual Independence Day Parade. The Volt, an electric vehicle with extended range. will finish its four-day, 1,776 mile route in New York City on Sunday. (Photo by Mark Finkenstaedt for Chevrolet)
  • The Chevrolet Volt �Freedom Drive� across the country continues in Fairfax, Virginia Saturday, July 3, 2010 as the Volt participates in the annual Independence Day Parade. The Volt, an electric vehicle with extended range. will finish its four-day, 1,776 mile route in New York City on Sunday. (Photo by Mark Finkenstaedt for Chevrolet)
  • The Chevrolet Volt �Freedom Drive� across the country continues in Fairfax, Virginia Saturday, July 3, 2010 as the Volt participates in the annual Independence Day Parade. The Volt, an electric vehicle with extended range. will finish its four-day, 1,776 mile route in New York City on Sunday. (Photo by Mark Finkenstaedt for Chevrolet)
  • A pre-production Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle with extended range travels around Pier 92 during a media test drive in New York, NY on Monday, March 29, 2010. (Photo by Steve Fecht for Chevrolet) (3/29/2010)
  • A pre-production Chevrolet Volt electric vehicle with extended range travels around Pier 92 during a media test drive in New York, NY on Monday, March 29, 2010. (Photo by Steve Fecht for Chevrolet) (3/29/2010)
  • The first pre-production Chevrolet Volt rolls off the line at the Detroit-Hamtramck manufacturing plant Wednesday, March 31, 2010 in Detroit, Michigan. The pre-production versions of the Volt will not be sold at dealerships, but will be used to assure all steps in the production system will meet the quality targets set by the Volt engineering team. (Photo by John F. Martin for Chevrolet) (04/01/2010)
  • A Chevrolet Volt battery at the General Motors Global Battery Systems Lab in Warren, Michigan Wednesday, June 30, 2010. The Chevrolet Volt will offer customers an unprecedented standard 8 year/100,000 mile warranty on its lithium-ion battery. GM engineers have completed more than 1 million miles and 4 million hours of validation battery testing since 2007. Each Volt battery pack has nine modules and 288 cells. GM designed and engineered 99 percent of the 155 components in each battery. (Photo by John F. Martin for Chevrolet)


[Source: GM-Volt]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 55 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's going to have to go down in price. After the first adopters get their hands on it, and everyone else starts looking at pure electric cars that come with increasing amounts of range at a lower cost.. the clock will be ticking for the Volt to remain relevant.

      IMHO, $30k is what it should be worth. It has less kWh and a cheaper battery chemistry than it's competition, and the gas engine is small and decontented. Those two factors should make the price comparable to something like the Leaf. I think $41k is the 'i don't want to sell it to you' or 'we want to make up for our R&D' cost.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I,ll wait.
      harlanx6
      • 4 Years Ago
      Volts and Leaves are not really comparable. They each will be a better choice in their respective niches. Until the recharge network is universal (which is going to take a while) the Leaf is a commuter, and the Volt commutes well, and is an all purpose car, that can replace the family cars we have now.
      harlanx6
      • 4 Years Ago
      Now there is a good reason not to buy just yet! The next model will be better and cheaper. (or at least it will seem cheaper because your tax money is buying everyone else's Volts now!)
        • 4 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        As with any technology, the early adopters always get the shaft. I guess being able to say you had the first one on the block is worth that price to some people.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I suspect a lower price won't be the only improvement for the 2nd generation Volt. It will probably have improved fuel economy by using an Atkinson-Miller cycle engine, some weight reduction measures, and improved aerodynamics.

      If it doesn't, the Plug-in Prius will steal its thunder and most of its customers.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Granted, the Plug-in Prius has less electric range than the Volt, and must run the gas engine at speeds above 65, two disadvantages compared to the Volt. But it has three advantages over the Volt - the purchase price will be less, the fuel economy in "range extending" mode is much better, and the "fuel" economy in electric drive mode is better, too.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Chris, I wish I could say that the Volt was the better product in every category, but I can't. I do think that the AER is critical, look at how people are complaining that the Volt gets just 35 on most days, and as little as 25 miles in freezing weather with traffic jams. With Toyota's pack management system they may get even worse results. Or the plug in Prius might just cycle between ICE and battery...
        But the plug in Prius will be tough competition for the Volt if they keep the MSRP below $35k. Does Toyota get around $2.5k for the tax credit on the Plug In Prius or has their credit run out for all Prius types? They claimed it would come in at a $3k-$5k premium over other Priuses but didn't mention which Prius class that would be. The Prius comes in MSRP's from $23k to $28k so the plug in price could conceivably be $26k but more likely closer to $33k less $2.5k for a total of $30.5k after tax credit. The Volt is already at $40.2k less $7.5k for a net of $32.7k.
        Would a normal person think that an extra $2.2k for the Volt is worth it? They would if they drive less than 15,000 miles a year and rely predominantly on the CD mode. They would prefer the ICE fuel economy of the Prius if they drive more than 20,000. Plus there is the lack of the 5th seat pulling one way vs. Prius ugly and the Volt kinda sporty factor pulling the other. The Prius is looking a bit dated but the new Prius family members should bring a little zing back to Toyota.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Prius_Plug-in_Hybrid
        • 4 Years Ago
        Chris, I don't know about Atkinson cycle, but GM has a lot of options. I have been trying to find efficiency numbers for the new Smartech 1.2L engine built by GM India. It is supposed to be lighter and more efficient than GM's 1.4L engine, but there is squat in the way of specs on it. If GM dropped a lighter, more efficient 1.2L in the 2013 Volt, it is possible that the CS mileage could go up from 35-38 mpg to somewhere around 40 mpg. Plus the fact that the engine is lighter means that the CD AER would be slightly longer as well. Combine that with a slightly higher percentage use of a 15 kWh battery pack (75% of 15 instead of 65% of 16) and you have 11.25 kWh of useable pack instead of 10.4 kWh so you would get 39-40 miles AER instead of the usual 35-36 miles of AER we are seeing from most Volt owners driving the Volt today.
        I don't see the plug in Prius as much of a competitor, it's AER is just too short. By 2014 it may be a different story, I think Toyota will eventually build a 30-40 mile AER Prius that can drive up to 65 mph using just electricity, but it will be a year or two too late to maintain their green crown.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Chris M,
        Toyota have managed to avoid major redesign of the Prius in it's body as they move to the plug-in by substituting lithium batteries for NiMH.
        As better batteries become available they can also move smoothly to increased range in EV mode.
        GM by adopting a moon shoot mentality has locked itself into major redesigns, with all the associated costs. In addition the price of the large battery pack weighs heavily on the price they can do.
        By the time Toyota offer a larger battery pack costs will have come down.
        It is simply a more optimal design strategy.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I have little doubt the Volt will drop $7500 in price right around the time the $7500 rebate expires.
        • 4 Years Ago
        you can't just throw a smaller battery into a Volt and expect it to run at all.

        Less capacity also means less power from the pack. So they would have to increase the useful percentage of the pack to make up for it... which lowers the lifespan considerably.

        Bottomline, they COULD build a Volt with a smaller pack... but it would take a complete re-engineering.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, but that "starting at $33,000" stripper model might only have a 25 AER, and fewer features to boot.

        To get the 40-mile "extended" AER version, you might have to pony up $3k to $5k, neatly splitting the difference.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Power is a function of BOTH voltage and current. And a smaller pack will have less peak current. So less available power.
        • 4 Years Ago
        An EV doesn't draw max current very often, any more than ICE runs WOT.

        For the overwhelming majority of applications, there's no difference.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No, a smaller pack with the same voltage simply runs in BEV mode for a shorter duration because it holds less energy. Instead of getting "40" miles, you get "30" miles or "25" miles. .

        Yes, the calibration is different, but then again, when GM uses a different ICE, they tweak the trans and possibly the rear end as well. And of course, there's a different ECU with a different EEPROM controlling the thing.

        That's not a major reengineering job. It's a minor tuning job.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Of course, prices will drop.

        The question is how fast, and for what?

        Why shouldn't GM make multiple EREV configurations?

        They sell their ICE cars with multiple ICE configurations with different performance characteristics.
        • 4 Years Ago
        That's not what I meant. I mean with the same range.

        Prices will drop. GM knows they can't sell that car for $41K straight up. Well, not many.
      • 4 Years Ago
      this made me laugh out loud even though the number is not official.
      because I said the volt price was inflated by the fed tax rebate because that's what they could get away with.
      not that 7500 lower is the right price of course. they first priced it at the pain threshold for the well meaning people willing to buy such a car. and then they added 7500 to take the tax rebate too.
      if even half way competently engineered they could sell it for 20 and make money on it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Renault reckon they can do the Zoe with more range, around 200 kilometres, when is a bit unclear, either 2012 or 2015:
        http://green.autoblog.com/2010/11/24/report-renault-shooting-for-150-mile-range-electric-vehicle-by/
        And (French):
        http://www.cartech.fr/news/renault-electrique-progres-en-vue-sur-les-batteries-39756323.htm

        Since they are leasing the batteries and the car itself costs around the same as a diesel, this provides good value, at least in Europe.
        They are well aware that they have to take out the $7500 of costs to make up for subsidies running down, and so I am a bit surprised that they think they can do this AND increase battery capacity.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Not really, no Dan. "Mankind" as an entity doesn't need to be brilliant, only some of mankind needs to be brilliant enough to figure out that they can make money. That's the essence of a market, that not everyone is equally brilliant. Certainly, we mostly aren't as brilliant as you, but I bet there are some engineers out there who are almost as smart, Dan. Or maybe they'll just steal your ideas off of ABG, if they are that do-able. The fact that at this time no one is building a sub-20k fully functional EV is about as good of proof as possible that it just can't be done. At this time. Ten years from now? Maybe. But I don't tell the future.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Aaaannnnndddddddd...... we're off into the conspiracy theories. Damn, I really didn't see that one coming. No, really!

        You are correct Dan. You alone have the truth. All hail Dan!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ziv, I never claimed 200$/kWh and I would actually be willing to consider up to 450$/kWh at the pack level if high life high quality cells like A123 which you sort of need for a short range pack.
        if we then say 8kWh at 450 that's 3600$ for the pack. combine that with a maybe 800cc 2 cylinder weight optimized ICEgen, improve the aerodynamics of the car so it goes further on same energy and reduce the weight by reducing the dimensions a bit where clever like raising the feet a bit and getting rid of the central column, then compounded by the reduction in weight from halving the battery pack and ICE weight and all the structural strength to carry that all the way down to the wheels then perhaps you can see that 20k is entirely doable, even with crude steel tech.
        and I would probably consider a slight variation of that (another drivetrain option) that used cheaper laptop cells that have shorter life and higher density, for a pack of maybe 24kWh, weighing maybe 40% more than the 8kWh pack. say 330$/kWh at the pack level so that's about 4k$ more than the other model. sell it for 25, range of around 200km.
        still the crude steel construction.

        and if the engineering were really competent the improvements would be far more dramatic than that.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ziv, you are not familiar with Dan F's engineer magic. He claims to be able to easily make sub $20K EVs. I keep telling him he needs to get some investors and build that cheap EV . . . but it just doesn't seem to happen.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yes, Danny, I have seen it. Quite enjoyable, though flawed in some of its claims and correct in others.

        But unlike you Dan, I also know not to make sweeping, grand statements about "humanity", since humanity is made up of billions of individuals of differing levels of evil, thoughtlessness and stupidity. Some of these individuals possess those traits in only trace amounts. I will grant that "humanity" is made up of mammals. We need to breath air. We like sweet and sour and salty. We are carbon based. Beyond that, and unlike you, me ego isn't so freaking huge to think that I can paint all those billions of individuals in my own extremely broad reductionist terms. That's why I can't fundamentally see myself as the only one on the planet as enlightened as I am. I'm not.

        Yes, Dan, you are the messenger. It's your message that is the problem.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Spence, some of them figure they can make more money by lying about electric cars so the sheepish masses keep buying their oil. please don't have such blind faith in mankind. think a little. it makes us better
        • 4 Years Ago
        I take it you haven't seen the documentary who killed the electric car. educate yourself.

        it's quite possible to mass produce an electric car most can afford that can beat a bugatti veyron on the quarter mile and be substantially more energy efficient than a nissan leaf.

        it is not done because humanity is equal measure evil, thoughtless and stupid. but eventually it will happen.
        don't hail me. hail the truth. I'm just the messenger.
        • 4 Years Ago
        ziv, on what do you really base that.. (and please don't be a schmuck and not answer and just ask me the same)
        I happen to know what batteries cost. what power electronics costs. and I think I have very good intuition on the rest. do you have any idea of what any of it costs? or do you simply base it on believing the lies the car makers tell you about the cost of EVs
        • 4 Years Ago
        Y'all are undoubtedly familiar with Rule 34, right? Well, I propose the Dan Rule. Here's the premise:
        If it can be engineered and produced at a price that meets demand, someone will engineer and produce it.

        Maybe it will be a major OEM. Maybe it will be Dan. But until it's been built, it's just speculation. In this case, since there certainly seems to be demand for a sub 20K EV, if it possible, someone would be building it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Spence, that assumes a lot of things, not least of which that mankind is entirely rational. not a particularly brilliant point.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Dan, batteries that will last at least 8 years cost between $350 and $600 per kWh in a reasonably well managed battery pack. Yes, I know that you can get batteries at a lower price per kWh but they won't last 8 years and that won't include the pack management system. I have been following this for years, and I see guys talking about $200 per kWh but they never seem to get those cheap batteries to CalCars. They just don't exist. If Felix can't find it, I doubt you can.
        I have driven the Volt and it is an incredible car. I have spoken to GM managers and they seem to be a clueless bunch when it comes to cars, but they are brilliant when it comes time to finesse the government. I haven't spoken to the GM engineers, but based on what the Volt is like, they seem to be a pretty brilliant bunch. The Volt rocks. And it is overpriced and its AER is about 5 miles too short. I think that the 2013 Volt will make some strides to ameliorate those shortcomings.
        • 4 Years Ago
        LOL! $20k? I see a lot of BEVs and EREVs being built for less than$30,000. Not!
        Building the volt for less than $30k is going to be very hard. Building a BEV with decent range, real world 120 miles will probably suffice, may be even harder in the short term, ie within 6 or 7 years.
        • 4 Years Ago
        that must be it
      • 4 Years Ago
      C'mon GM . . . do it. If they can get the price down, they can dominate the next generation of auto sales. Right now, I think Nissan has a lead since they are so much cheaper than the Volt . . . but if GM can get the PHEV price down and get it relatively close to the pure electrics then they can dominate.
      • 4 Years Ago
      "The General expects that reducing the size of the Volt's lithium-ion battery pack, could contribute to a $7,500 price reduction for GM's next-gen plug-in hybrid"

      Yeah, cause that's what I look for in my electric car....a smaller battery pack and more reliance on the gas engine.

      Good on you GM.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I suspect that what they meant was a physically smaller pack, not one that produced fewer usable Kw of power. So you would have less weight, less cost, but at least the same range.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ziv,

        GM actually ended up using more of the pack than originally planned to reach the current EPA range. Extrapolated from EPA estimates, it uses 12.6 kWh from the 16 kWh battery for 79% of battery capacity. You would have to go to 90% of a 14kWh pack to get the same range.

        So unless they plan very high battery utilization, smaller battery capacity will result in smaller range.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ine, I have read several reports that it takes between around 12.4 kWh from the wall to completely fill the Volts' battery from fully discharged. The two accounts that I have seen said that the Volt pack was using either 10.4 or 10.6 of its total capacity, up from the 8.8 kWh that it was supposed to use earlier. They say that there is 10-15% loss between the wall and the pack, but that doesn't mean that the pack is using 12.4 kWh of its capacity, just that it takes 12.4 to fill the 10.4. The efficiency is supposed to go up if you charge the pack with a 240 watt, 30 amp charger, the 110 is the least efficient way to fuel it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @byz,
        About the only battery chemistry which has a bigger SOC, meaning that you can use more of it, without killing the number of cycles you get is lithium titanate chemistry, which has a much lower energy density so that you would not save any weight.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I don't know, BVZ. I think that the gen II Volt will have a 15 kWh battery pack and it will use 80% of its capacity initially instead of 65% like the gen I Volt, which will allow the Volt to have a real world range of 40 miles instead of 35 miles. As GM gets more comfortable with the life expectancy of the pack, they will use more of it upfront in the life cycle, thereby allowing the pack size to drop from 16 kWh to 15 kWh and eventually maybe to 14 kWh. And it is a virtuous circle, as the pack weight drops, city miles AER increase slightly, suspension can be slightly lighter...
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ziv,

        That's exactly what I was saying. By having a physically smaller pack that still produced that same amount of usable power (i.e. using a larger portion of the pack's theoretical limit) they will cut costs but still maintain range.
      Realistic
      • 3 Years Ago
      The reasons why smart people do not buy Electric or Hybrid cars are: Batteries are expensive, short lived, efficiency isn’t 100 % and the electricity is not free. Going electric you won’t decrease Air Pollution because 50 % of the electricity is produced by burning COAL. By the way a Jetta Diesel, TDI for $23000 makes 40MPG. With a full tank of Chevy Volt, driving non-stop, you make 37MPG, plus $3 or more, the price of electricity you charged 16.0-kW-hr lithium-ion, the hefty 750-pound battery pack.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is exactly what the tax rebate was designed to do, to prime the "economies of scale" pump, get the plug in market going, and then disappear as costs drop to the point of real competitiveness.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, that is the question. I'm not totally against a credit extension, but it should be gradually declining to zero. Eventually, you have to take off the training wheels.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The EV portion might follow the PC computer model. But the ICE portion won't.
        • 4 Years Ago
        What we are also seeing here is a reversal of the auto pricing model to reflect the electronics pricing model. In electronics, over time prices drop as the product improves, do to streamlining of manufacturing, continuing R&D, etc. In autos, usually every time the product would improve the price would go up. New breakthroughs in efficiency? Increase the HP output and charge more. Then add a Landau top and plenty of marketing targeted at the insecurities of the emasculated modern man. Voila!

        Since we're all familiar with the computer pricing model now, where a better product follows a lower price over a product's lifetime, I think we'll see more and more of this in our increasingly electronic automobiles.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Of course, the real $33,000 question is whether 200k unit volume is enough to amortize cost to allow a $7.5k price drop.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Thanks. Finally someone who gets it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I suspect that part of the cost savings will come from increased volume. Some of the savings (at this point) I suspect will come from reduced costs as they refine the design and manage to use better and cheaper batteries. Also, the suppliers will be simplifying and improving the componentry as well.

        Ultimately, though, most of the cost savings will come from hiring Dan F. :)
      • 4 Years Ago
      A price drop like that would surely be impressive, but when in the last 50 years of automobile history has a price drop of that magnitude ever happened?

      I believe a price drop like that would be a new model using the voltic powertrain, not the Volt itself.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Stew, maybe the best comparison will be to the price drops the auto industry saw when Ford started mass producing the Model T. There has been no real mass production of BEV's or EREV's in over 100 years. Most of the electric intent parts are expensive due to their not being produced in great numbers. Now that GM is buying hundreds a week instead hundreds a year the price will start to drop. When they are building thousands a week all bets are off.
        How much will the prices drop? Probably not enough, soon enough. But when gas hits $4 a gallon this time, we will have options that weren't there last time.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Stew, I kind of thought that might have been why you put in the 50 year comment...
        ;-)
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ziv I know the Model T did have several significant price drops, one of my favorite books as a teenager was 'The Complete History of Ford'. The book details the Model T discounts year by year, thats why I said only in the last 50 years :-)

        Sadly, I do think wincros is correct that a price drop of that size would start some kind of legal action.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You mean the Volt power train in a Cruze level body? Oh, that is what it is.

        Doubtless, it will undergo a facelift so existing owners don't feel ripped off. These days it could generate a class action suit if it were not a new model.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Note that the big drop ties to also having a smaller battery, and likely other content pulled. It'll be a "stripper" for advertising purposes.
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