• Jan 25, 2011
We've been salivating over the Vyrus 986 M2 since last weekend, whic is when the bike took a bow in Verona. Beyond the non-traditional design, heaps of carbon fiber and hub-centric steering, the weapon is bound to be pull-your-eyelids-off fast thanks to its svelte curb weight of just 297 pounds. Throw in a modified Honda CBR600RR engine good for a blistering 125 ponies and you've got the recipe for a whole heap of naughty two-wheeled dreams. The bike was built to tango on the Moto2 circuit, and as such, there was dim hope of us common folk ever laying our hands on the handlebars.

Today, that hope got a little brighter. Vyrus has announced that it will produce a street-going version of the 986 M2, complete with pesky bits like headlights, stoplights, turn signals and a functional horn. According to Asphalt & Rubber, the bike will likely pack a slightly softer punch than the full-on race version, though an optional track mode will turn up the muscle to appropriately absurd levels. Look for this monster to hit the street in September, and head over to MotoBlog.it for a closer look.

[Source: Asphalt & Rubber | Image: MotoBlog.it]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Much better looking than the Bimota Tesi 2D. Both still frick'n cool.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Awesome!
      • 3 Years Ago
      BAD ASS looking :) cool :)
      • 3 Years Ago
      Tuned CBR600RR engine good for 125 horses? Damn, they know they are doing. I love the look and knowing it has Honda engine, it's going to be reliable.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I thought I was looking at a Bimota at first. I have ridden a bike with a setup similar to this and I can tell you it feels very weird when the pace gets hot. I did not have any confidence in what the front end was giving back to me. I can't see any way the feedback can be replaced with this setup. There is a good reason MotoGP bikes still run telescopic forks given the drawbacks they have. Hub center steering is a nice engineering and physics exercise, but the human software of the rider is not really compatible so far.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Now that is a beautiful machine. Well done, Vyrus!
      • 3 Years Ago
      That looks evil.... I love it.

      So besides looking absolutely sick, what are the advantages to this kind of steering?

      What country is this bike coming out of - I've never heard of the brand before?
        Carlos
        • 3 Years Ago
        It comes from Italy if I am correct and the reason for hub centric steering is because it isolates the braking forces from the steering and suspension which tends to eat up suspension travel.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Hub-centered steering is definitely advanageous, for the reasons that Carlos pointed out. Still, it is a little surprising that they are going with HCS for a Moto2 bike. HCS bikes tend to have a numb feel in the handlebars and virtually every racer is accustomed to racing a bike with telescopic fork steering. It'll take a lot of adjustment on the rider's behalf to get the most out of HCS.

        Bimota's Tesi 3D uses this system as well but they don't use it in their race applications.
        • 3 Years Ago
        To add to what Carlos said, the traditional telescopic fork design creates a huge moment about the steering head, requiring beefy forks and a very strong frame to support them. By separating those forces, and directing them right back into the core of the bike (generally a stressed-member engine), you eliminate the need for a big, heavy frame, leading to a much lighter bike. You also end up with a lower, more concentrated center of gravity. The geometry also remains static during braking (or can even be designed to oppose weight shift), leading to lighter, consistent steering and handling.
        • 3 Years Ago
        The 135kg factory version for Moto2 teams ready to compete in the various championships will be sold starting from € 55,000.

        The Replica Kit, is a track only version. If you already own a CBR600RR (Vyrus is also developing a kit for R6 engines) you can build your own Moto2, reusing the brakes, engine, electrical system, electronics and dashboard. Vyrus will be selling the kit with chassis, bodywork, wheels and suspensions for € 16.950 plus VAT, and the Italian manufacturer can do the assembly job or send you the kit.

        SL Replica is the street version, which will be available late this summer and will be very close to the track versions, even if the engine will be standard or slightly modified, it will still maintain the same fantastic aesthetics with the addition of lights, mirrors, and turn signals and will go for the pricely sum of € 25,000.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Italy =)
      • 3 Years Ago
      For those of you who love it, just know that Tom Cruise has one... think about that for a little bit. #ImJustSaying
        • 3 Years Ago
        Then the bike is good @ couch-jumping, too.
        • 3 Years Ago
        He owns a vyrus... Not this one.

        This is below him and his theatans
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow, what I would not give for a ride on track day to see how that new steering feels and handles in the corners.

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