• Jan 19, 2011
Recently, a slew of reports have surfaced suggesting that many of China's automakers are scaling back development of alternative energy vehicles. Specifically, reports indicate that weak consumer interest is forcing Chinese automakers to ditch plans to manufacture electric vehicles. With that in mind, it's surprising, at least to some degree, to stumble upon news indicating that China is forging forward with plans to install perhaps millions of plug-in vehicle charging stations within the next decade.
On the sidelines of this year's Detroit Auto Show, Wang Dazong, president of Beijing Automotive Industry Holding Co., (BAIC), told reporters that China is:
Working on a plan - and I think it will be announced very, very soon - and is basically calling for having, in ten years, electric car parks of 10 million (units) or above.
Back in October, China's Minister of Science and Technology stated that the nation's production of battery-powered vehicles could exceed one million by 2020, but even if plug-ins hit that level, the installation of ten million chargers would still be difficult to justify.

[Source: Green Car Advisor]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      This should be more than enough chargers for the 250 electric cars Chinese companies expect to sell. I suppose building 10 million chargers is a nice gesture but considering where that electricity is coming from it's mostly symbolic.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        The amount of hydroelectric and nuclear capacity China is adding is miniscule compared to the amount of coal-fired plants they build. It's amazing how they get a free pass from environmentalists for a token gesture like this.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        Well, your quote says they "expect to unveil" a stimulus package, meaning that they hadn't as of the time that article was written. A short Google search turned this up:

        http://www.wbcsd.org/plugins/DocSearch/details.asp?type=DocDet&ObjectId=MzgyNzY

        "China's new energy stimulus plan – expected to include additional policy support for renewable energy development – has been delayed indefinitely, according to a high-ranking government official."

        Now that was as of April 2009, a month after your article was written.

        I don't know the economics of how many charging stations per EV you need and I'm sure there are tons of variables to consider, but if hybrid sales in China are any indication of how EVs will fare, 10 million will be far too many.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        Hi Scorch,
        If you carry on with a couple of searches online you will soon see that China has:
        The largest wind program in the world.
        The largest hydro power program in the world.
        The largest nuclear program in the world.
        A massive drive to increase energy efficiency, including closing older, more polluting coal plants whilst simultaneously building bigger, newer, more efficient ones.
        Incomparably the largest rail building program in the world, which is far more energy efficient than car or aeroplanes, including building 10,000 miles of high speed rail internally and linking their network to 17 countries, including Europe.
        Far and away the largest residential solar heating industry in the world, with tens of millions installed.
        Far and away the largest electric bike and scooter fleet in the world, again in the tens of millions.

        So perhaps you will forgive me if I see your characterisation of the Chinese lagging in efficient energy production and use as a touch one-sided! ;-)


        • 12 Hours Ago
        Coal power is actually gaining in its share of Chinese electricity production. Wind power accounts for 0.2% of China's total energy production and nuclear accounts for less than 2%. Meanwhile, coal still accounts for 83% of Chinese energy production. Yes, they may have the largest _____ project in the world going on, but you have to look at it on a relative scale. When you delve into the actual numbers they are not nearly as impressive.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        Scorch,
        Perhaps you would care to give your source for the claim that it has not happened?
        The build of other energy resources is indeed taking place, at breakneck speed, with China now the biggest market for wind, for instance, and massively accelerating build of hydro and nuclear:
        http://nextbigfuture.com/2010/03/china-increasing-nuclear-and.html
        • 12 Hours Ago
        'China is expected to unveil in the coming weeks another extensive and unprecedented stimulus package—reported to be in the range of $440 billion to $660 billion—dedicated solely to new energy development over the next decade, including generous investments in wind, solar, and hydropower."-

        Sounds like what Obama promised with the new "green jobs" economy. Too bad he was stringing us along. but at least the rich will be getting $400Billion in taxcuts these next two years.

        -If those expectations are fulfilled, China could emerge as the unquestioned global leader in clean-energy production, significantly increasing its chances to wean its energy appetite off coal, and at the same time ushering in an era of sustainable economic growth by exporting these clean-energy technologies to the world.'-

        ...really wish Obama had pushed this and not the Bush tax cuts..
        • 12 Hours Ago
        That article was written in 2009, it is 2011 and that stimulus package still has not been released. Would you care to try again?
        • 12 Hours Ago
        China can't suddenly ramp nuclear production, when the technology was restricted from them for many years.
        They are progressing in moving on from coal as fast as they possibly can, and so allegations that they get a free ride are far from true.
        They currently build nuclear plants for $1565/kw, and they are ramping as fast as they can train people and develop the technology.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        'China is expected to unveil in the coming weeks another extensive and unprecedented stimulus package—reported to be in the range of $440 billion to $660 billion—dedicated solely to new energy development over the next decade, including generous investments in wind, solar, and hydropower. If those expectations are fulfilled, China could emerge as the unquestioned global leader in clean-energy production, significantly increasing its chances to wean its energy appetite off coal, and at the same time ushering in an era of sustainable economic growth by exporting these clean-energy technologies to the world.'

        http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/06/china_energy_numbers.html

        That is a pretty substantial 'token gesture!'

        The big one is nuclear power for the future, but ramping up production takes time.
        However by 2020 China should have around the same nuclear output as the US - and after that the sky is the limit.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        The Chinese are building a vast amount of new low carbon energy, chiefly hydroelectric and nuclear but with a contribution from wind.
        Rome, or Beijing either, was not built in a day, and it is pretty foolish to simply give up because not all issues are solved instantly.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's difficult to tell as the original statements are not sourced, but my guess would be that the Chinese might be planning a million BEVs, but many more plug-in hybrids, and so the need for chargers becomes apparent.
      Far less Chinese people have a garage to charge their car at home than in the States, too.
      • 3 Years Ago
      China recently said they will spend 500 BILLION on Nuclear Reactors over the next 30 years.

      China is spending more on Wind, and Solar installations then any other country.

      But let's look at their current energy production, and yell Shame! Sheesh, some people.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        There is no good reason not to site nuclear power plants near habitation.
        The so-called 'greens' have a policy of spreading maximum FUD about nuclear power.
        The story of Three Mile Island was actually one of the worst possible accident, which it's containment vessel dealt with (Chernobyl did not even have one) and no-one was killed.

        Nuclear risks, unlike those for the hyper-dangerous coal industry, are calculated on the basis of Linear No Threshold, which says that radiation is dangerous at however small the amount.
        There is actually no solid evidence for this, in fact at low doses radiation appears to strengthen the immune system.
        This is not improbable, as by far the greatest amount of radiation we are exposed to is natural, from the rocks and soil around us.

        If coal was assessed on the same basis the industry would not exist.
        Even on present loaded risk assessment criteria coal is a proven mass killer.
        Since in practise renewables rely heavily on coal and gas burn as they are utterly incapable of running a society without them, they are also many, many times as dangerous as nuclear.

        This leaves aside new small reactor designs which are in any case buried, and hence can be built close in town.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        245GW, two and a half times the size of the US fleet.
        http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-12-02/china-nuclear-boom-sees-reactor-builders-risk-know-how-for-cash.html

        I think that will continue to be revised - upwards.
        • 12 Hours Ago
        If we were not so hamstrung by environmentalists maybe we could build a few more nuclear reactors ourselves. Am I the only one here that appreciates the irony that is the same group of people gunning to have nuclear reactors taken offline in the 70's is now demanding we build more of them? Too bad we can't build a nuclear reactor anywhere near human habitations or it might be a really good way to make electricity.
      • 3 Years Ago
      A good helping one move about the new feature cars. http://www.fastpennycarsnow.com/
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's over a million a year, better get started!
      • 3 Years Ago
      China is doing it while our Government is tied up, fed by special interest and lobbying, on debating if we should do it or not. It will take a progressive Congress to tell special interest "No." and just do it.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Fast forward to 2020:

      When the 10 million charging stations are in place..

      The Chinese government will declare the sales of ALL cars that
      run on gasoline and any other form of oil.. ILLEGAL.

      BOOM!!

      Billions of dollars that China pays for foreign oil are saved!

      They already did something similar with gasoline mini scooters
      http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/11323
      (click transcript)

      ff
        • 12 Hours Ago
        There isn't enough oil in the world to provide fuel for all the cars that are going to be built outside of the traditionally rich, car driving countries.
        Something like 2 billion new cars on the road are involved.
        Some Chinese government departments realise this, others have their head in the sand like most Western Governments.

        The electrification of the Chinese fleet will be far faster and more thorough than anyone outside of Nissan realises, or they won't be able to drive.

        Once the penny really drops with the Chinese Government then the move will be far swifter than anything in the West outside of France.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Damn. We need such a program.

      Can't we at least pass a law saying that all new homes & apartments must equip their parking places with CONDUIT for easy installation of charging systems.

      No reason to mandate actual charging systems yet but lets at least install plastic tubing to a circuit panel such that we can later easily add a charging system by just pulling wires through the tubing.
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