• Jan 18, 2011
1998 Toyota Tacoma

When an automaker is forced to issue a recall, the defective part or feature is generally the fault of the automaker or of an OEM supplier it contracted to. In the case of the Toyota Tacoma – part of a 110,000-unit recall in 2009 – the problem appears to have been traced back to the supplier. And now the supplier is forced to pay for its mistakes.

The company in question, according to reports, is Dana, the Ohio-based OEM contractor supplying (among other components) axles and driveshafts for automobiles, commercial trucks and heavy equipment. In this case, it supplied the frames for the Tacoma pickup which were found to rust when exposed to road salt.

Although in 2010 Dana sold the plant that manufactures the frame to Mexican conglomerate Grupo Porza's Metalsa subsidiary, since the component in question was built prior to the sale (from 1995 to 2000), Dana has reportedly been forced to shell out $25 million to Toyota over the issue.

[Source: Reuters]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      Terry Jones
      • 4 Days Ago

      so if I have one of these trucks and received no recall. what is my next course of action

      • 3 Years Ago
      So we should blame Ford for putting Firestone tires on their Explorer, right?

      Black&Blue, you're a huge dolt... Just give up and put a sock in it...
      • 3 Years Ago
      This article incorrectly says the frames were built in 2008.

      http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2011/01/12/toyota-awarded-m-dana-holding-settlement/

      • 3 Years Ago
      Ever heard of oil spray?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Road salt causing rust, this is some sort of monumental finding!
        • 3 Years Ago
        Yup...exactly what I was thinking. Come to Quebec and see the other cars on the road and you'll see what the definition of "excessive" is.
        • 3 Years Ago
        It's excessive rust...
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's why I get every one of my cars rust-proofed.
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's a nice looking truck btw. I wish the current Toyotas were styled so clean.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Good call, I miss the last generation Tacomas.

        ...and the ones before that, cause it was easy as sin to swap a diesel in
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice looking truck.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Black@blue is a sad blind Toyota hater and comes across as a 2 year old pitching a fit in the grocery store?
      • 3 Years Ago
      My neighbor had his beautiful Tacoma 4WD truck recalled a few years ago for this. He and the wife were offered way more than what it was possibly worth. They looked around, drove some cars, and came home in a brand new Camry. No matter who you want to blame, Toyota, at least on this one, really treated their customers right. I respect them for that, and my neighbors sure seem to like their new car.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Jeeze mister Backstreet Boys, you obviously need to take some fresh air outside. There's this thing call the real world out there you knoww.
      • 3 Years Ago
      The OEM is responsible for the performance of that vehicle and the management of their suppliers, so ultimately, yes it is Toyota's fault. I know the keyboard jockey's find that hard to believe, but here in the real world that is how it works. Design specifications, final testing, and approval are the responsibility of the OEM, whether it is Toyota, Ford, GM, Honda, etc. That doesn't excuse the supplier if they produce a defective part, but warranty claims hinge on the agreements and terms and conditions between the automaker and supplier. Those will vary. We don't have enough information to assign blame, but ultimate responsibility lies with Toyota as they design, test, and produce the final product.
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