• Jan 14, 2011
The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration is looking to reduce the number of injuries sustained by people ejected from vehicles during accidents. To that end, the government organization has just ruled to establish a new mandate that forces automakers to institute new ejection mitigation systems.
In the common tongue, that means side air bags will need to be more robust and longer than they are at present, and that in some cases, side glass will need unique glazing. There's also some indication that side impact air bags will now need to be tethered at the bottom. The rules only apply to vehicles under 10,000 pounds.

Automakers only have a short period of time to implement the new standard. NHTSA says that the law will begin being enforced starting September 1, 2013.

While the rules seem to be aimed at catering to people who refuse to wear their seatbelts, NHTSA says that the regulations will help protect everyone in the event of a rollover, even those who are properly secured with traditional restraints. Head over to the NHTSA using the link below to read the full ruling.

[Source: NHTSA – PDF link]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 61 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      So... Everyone applauds laws from the government telling them they must "be safe" and wear seatbelts, but get pissy when it continually grows and tells you what your car must have? Maybe if this country weren't full of pants-wetting sissies, there wouldn't have a nanny state wiping up after you all. Deserve what you get.
      • 3 Years Ago
      They are already doing this. Haven't you noticed the greenhouse on cars shrinking?
      Pretty soon the all the glass in cars will be 6 inches high. Just like a chopped 32 Ford
      • 3 Years Ago
      In about 10 years an economy car is going to cost $30,000 due to all these ridiculous safety regs. A car will have bulletproof glass, 20 airbags and 5000 pounds of steel to keep it from crushing in a 100mph collision.
        • 3 Years Ago
        As hard as it is to say...I'm with Sea Urchin...I want to be as protected as possible. I'd HATE to have someone do their mack daddy on me...in my car or otherwise, accidentally or not. No ejeculating in my car!!
        • 3 Years Ago
        "No ejeculating in my car!!"

        LOL!
        • 3 Years Ago
        Many economy cars now are nicer than many luxury cars were then, too. Its amazingly difficult to find a car optioned-down as much as a basic model was even 10-15 years ago. This is often good and reduces cost by reducing variability, but still. A Hyundai Accent today is the same size as an Elantra was 10 years ago, more fuel efficient, more luxurious, and the same price or less in real dollars, let alone inflation-adjusted dollars.
        • 3 Years Ago
        And wages are significantly dropping too to make up for it. Imagine how cheap cars could be if they left these regulations where they are, we could actually afford NEW cars without having to go in debt significantly for 5 years.
        • 3 Years Ago
        SU: dont try and argue with people who dont accept facts. The lack of education and critical thinking skills is why our political system is broken and our country is going to hellinahandbasket.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ bmxer10, i have to disagree with you. These days people text and drive, eat and drive, read and drive, heck...mack off and drive. So if i am in an accident, i want to be protected as much as possible.
        • 3 Years Ago
        " 5000 pounds of steel to keep it from crushing in a 100mph collision"

        ...and the speed limit will be lowered to 55MPH XD
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here we go again, another $10k will be added onto the price of new cars to keep STUPID people alive. As many have noted they already have such devices they are called seat belts. And all can be avoided by paying attention to the road while driving, hang up, stop texting and quit putting your damn make up on while going 75 MPH. Things by the way I see regularly on our roadways.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think "ejection mitigation" systems have been required in all new cars by law for some time, they're called seat belts, try wearing one.
      • 3 Years Ago
      "The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration is looking to reduce the number of injuries sustained by people ejected from vehicles during accidents."

      Make them wear seat belts. Problem solved.
      • 3 Years Ago
      NHTSA's suggestion of stronger side windows will doom the 300/yr victims of vehicle immersion, as well as others who are victims of entrapment (i.e., fire), to a horrible death. NHTSA's ruling is intended to protect vehicle occupants who refuse to wear seatbelts. Not wearing seatbelts is a conscious decision by the vehicle occupants; NHTSA's own statistics have shown the great benefits of wearing seatbelts. While I agree that side air bags will save lives, it has been proven that stronger side window glass will render glass-breaking tools ineffective, thereby preventing escape during an entrapment situation.
      My awareness of this issue began when my grandson drowned in his car three years ago. Since then I have researched vehicle immersion and consulted with experts around the world who all agree that immediate exit via a side window is crucial to survival. Being able to break the side window glass is essential, but if automakers follow NHTSA's advice, everyone trapped in a vehicle will be prevented from escaping, and thereby surviving.
      My research shows that the majority of immersion survivors escaped through a window, in many cases by breaking the glass themselves or having help from a bystander. NHTSA has chosen to ignore me and other advocates, despite years of effort on the part of many concerned people. The glass industry has had NHTSA’s ear for a long time, and of course they would profit greatly from a change in auto glass requirements.
      Please contact me for more information and links to experts who have studied this issue for year and years (including Dr. Gordon Giesbrecht of Manitoba who has published his findings and demonstrated his immersion tests in videos that are available to the public). My web site also provides information, links, statistics, etc.: http://sites.google.com/site/getoutaliveorg/.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I swear, in 10-20 years, cars won't have any windows, just cameras and VR helmets. The amount of glass is shrinking every year.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh for the love of Sean Connery...
      • 3 Years Ago
      Would it not simply be easier to ban all private, police, commercial, industrial, and government vehicle ownership? Is that not the problem anyway? Just ban all cars - problem solved!

      - Your intelligent friends at the NHTSA
      • 3 Years Ago
      How could humans possibly have survived on earth this long without the NHTSA?

      Long live the NHTSA.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Laminated glass sounds like a great idea, until you're sinking in a lake. Of my vehicles I have an '87, '97, and '05, and in none of them do I feel unsafe. I wear my seatbelt 100% of the time, and for myself and others that works just fine for not being ejected.
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