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Cadillac Escalade (GM)
Tennessee Titans defensive tackle Jovan Haye knows a thing or two about defense -- but when thieves stole his luxury SUV, he was powerless to intercept them. Fortunately, his car's security tracking device allowed him to recover his vehicle.

Haye told AOL Autos he "felt violated" when he learned that his 2010 Range Rover Sport had been stolen by a professional car theft ring after he'd taken it into his dealership for a routine service. "It belonged to me," he said. "You work hard for things in your life."

Fortunately for Haye, the car was located within two hours of it being reported missing and tracked electronically to Nashville International Airport. The car had sustained only minor damage to its paintwork and, after a quick clean-up, Haye was able to drive it to practice the following week.

"Replacing a new car's a hassle. I'm just glad to get my car back," Haye said.

Haye is not alone in having a stolen car recovered and returned to him. Across the nation, a car is stolen every 27 seconds. The most stolen late-model cars include the Cadillac Escalade, Chevrolet Silverado, Dodge Charger and Infiniti G37, while older vehicles that are often stolen include the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry and Dodge Caravan.

Thieves are also routinely stealing high-value components, and in many cases, they will steal the whole vehicle to get the prize they're after. In one widely reported case -- the theft of civil rights campaigner Jesse Jackson's Escalade last year -- it was the Escalade's leather seat covers the thieves were after.

Patrick Clancy, a representative at LoJack, which manufacturers a range of auto-recovery devices, said car owners can expect a recovery rate of 90 percent or more when using his company's theft recovery devices. "LoJack helps police track down the criminals behind vehicle theft, which is often committed as part of a much bigger crime. So, LoJack actually helps get these bad guys off of the streets."

Typically, once a car owner alerts the theft-recovery system that their car is missing, a car's tracking device will be activated and the local police department notified. Often, sensing the chance to net a wider gang of criminals, police units will be mobilized to search for the vehicle. In some instances, vehicles can be recovered in minutes, and having a theft-recovery device installed on your car can help reduce your auto insurance.

Some auto recovery tales border on the unbelievable. An Escalade owner in Dallas found his car was tracked to a storage unit where 13 other stolen GM vehicles were being parted out for profit. The total recovery value of all the cars was about a quarter of a million dollars. Electronic tracking devices also played a part in locating a 2001 Corvette in Southern California that had been stolen for the unbelievable ninth time. In a sad tale, after a Greensboro, N.C., man was found dead and his car missing, police were able to apprehend a murder suspect.

See Lojack's complete list below:

10. Major Chop Shop Busted – Dallas police tracked a 2003 Cadillac Escalade equipped with LoJack and discovered a total of 13 stolen GM vehicles, valued at $234,500.

9. LoJack Tackles Recovery for NFL Player – A Land Rover owned by Tennessee Titans defensive tackle Jovan Haye was stolen from a dealership's service center and recovered at the Nashville International Airport.

8. LoJack System Foils Lamborghini Thief – Miami-Dade police recovered two Lamborghini Gallardos – worth a combined value of $370,000 – which were rented with fraudulent credit cards from an exotic car rental company. Both vehicles were recovered in a little over an hour.

7. VIN Switching Doesn't Fool LoJack – A stolen Dodge Caravan led Rhode Island police to discover a VIN switching theft ring involving more than 10 stolen vehicles.

6. Thieving Tow Truck Driver –Philadelphia police tracked down a stolen BMW equipped with LoJack, taken at the hands of a tow truck driver who later admitted to towing and stealing a full 27 vehicles – all of which had been taken to a junkyard to be crushed for profit!

5. Saving Police Bait Car – LoJack helped Sacramento police recover its stolen Acura Integra bait car, which is used to catch car thieves in the act.

4. Professional Cadillac Thief Thwarted – A stolen Cadillac equipped with LoJack led detectives to a chop shop. The suspect later admitted to stealing and stripping 400 Cadillacs over a three-year period.

3. LoJack Gives Vehicle Nine Lives – A 2001 Corvette was stolen and recovered for the ninth time. In this instance, the vehicle was tracked down in less than an hour.

2. LoJack Makes a "Key" Recovery – A brazen thief broke into a dealership in Washington and stole a 2003 Hummer along with the keys to 60 other vehicles on the lot. Fortunately, the Hummer was tracked down by police in less than two hours. All the keys were found in the recovered vehicle.

1. LoJack Leads Police to Murder Victim's Killer – A stolen pickup led police to discover the identity and arrest an alleged murderer, who killed the vehicle's owner and drove away with the victim's vehicle. Gaston, NC, police picked up the vehicle's signal only 16 minutes after activation about 100 miles away from the crime scene. They later arrested the suspect for first-degree murder and other crimes.

Read more from our partner Motor Trend: Top 10 Celebrity Rides.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 56 Comments
      • 3 Months Ago
      I have two cars with Lojack which will work fine...Had a problem one time when one sytem activated and I was out of town. Lojack couldnt tell me which car it was ?? ... I have another sytem in a third car that activated as soon as the car is moved (doesnt have to be started).. a GPS tracking system is activated immediately and the central station can see the car traveling down the road on a map on their computer...they call me and confirm and direct police to the exact location ...
      • 3 Months Ago
      ON STAR enough said
      • 3 Months Ago
      I BET IF YOU GET RID OF THE I GUESS YOU CAN CALL THEM PEOPLE,MEXICAN'S THE CRIME RATE WOULD GO DOWN BY AT LEAST A THIRD AND I GUESS WE ARE STUCK WITH THE OTHER'S,HYBRED MONKEY'S AND IF WE CAN GET RID OF THEM THIS WOULD TRULY BE A GREAT NATION, I GUESS THE TRUTH HURT'S BUT IT IS THE TRUTH
      • 3 Months Ago
      The best one is that a girls car was stolen, and she told her dad. About an hour later a man comes to the dads house asking for directions. He saw that it is her daughters and called the police. The world is weird like that!
      • 3 Months Ago
      Most stolen vehicles in florida are sold thru mexican owned auto yards with phony ID plates and fake titles for cash to illegal aliens .
      tsphilicia
      • 3 Months Ago
      Wow this is just an add for LOJACK. My car is not a junker by any means..... However I have children...... So my theft deterrent is pretty much the fact that is piled with empty beverage containers and wrinkled food wrappers ..... It also has that smell of old socks and I think there may be a cheeseburger someones foot may have shoved way up under the front seat... I'm sure some would be car thief said to another regarding my car in the lot at work where two have already been stolen... " Dude let's steal a cleaner one."
      Harry Hurt
      • 3 Months Ago
      I would not be surprized if these illegal aliens steal cars, take them back home and sell them. Then they could afford to stay home.
      ioogogh
      • 3 Months Ago
      Back in the early 90s I had a VW corado.......dark green with a super charger.I liked that thing.On the way to work one morning I looked down and noticed I was out of gas,didnt know if Id even make it to work.I did make it and got a company car to drive out of town for the day,let my dad who works in our store with my VW.He drove it to the bank and didnt put gas in it .My dad never takes the keys out of a vehicle,NOT EVER so when he got back to our store he left the keys in the corado.I come back from out of town in the afternoon in the company car,I go in and work an hour and its quiting time.I go out and the VW is gone.I asked my dad where he parked it,he said same place you do.......GONE.I call the cops and they make a report.I call the insurance company and report it .The next day a local cop calls me,he asked if I knew where my VW was,I said NOPE,someone took it.He said ride over to angsley park,its a business park close by.So over I went and there it sat,OUT OF GAS.They made it 2 blocks and it ran out of fuel.Key still in the car,battery dead from them trying to start it after it quit.......I got my car back without a scratch on it.
      Archaeoone
      • 3 Months Ago
      My husband has the best stolen car story. When he was was in college in NYC, he parked his Camaro at a local public garage. When he went to get his car to drive home, he discovered it had been stolen. The police were contacted and took all the details. Several days later, he got a call from the FBI, letting him know that they found his car in TN. They told him it was impounded in TN, was going to be cked. out and they would contact him with additional info at a later date. They did say they would eventually return the car after they finished the investigation. He didn't hear from them for almost a week. The next call from the FBI was to tell him that the car had been stolen from the place where they had impounded it (very reassuring that the car was taken from an FBI impound location). He next got a call from NYPD informing him that the car was found at his parkiing garage in NYC. with a note in the windshield indicating that the thief needed the car to return to NYC and after the return trip no longer needed the car. For at least a year after the event, my husband would get periodic calls from the FBI, usually asking inane questions. No one, from the FBI or NYPD ever indicated what had actually transpired.
      • 3 Months Ago
      those stealing your car to sell over seas already know how to get around all the stuff, even lojack. thats there job. there not street ponks who car jack. Those people are very good at knowing all the systems in the car. Many have auto techs on the pay roll per say.
      jmenor3
      • 3 Months Ago
      I had ONE car stolen. It was a Caddie. The small-time thieves did SO MUCH damage to the car that my insurance co. wanted to write it off. Luckily for me, I'm pretty handy, and I got it running somewhat normal and drove it for another 2 years. My best friend wasn't so lucky... his Caddie was stolen TWICE, and the damage was so bad that he left it in a K-Mart parking lot unlocked with the keys hanging from the ignition. Idiot thieves took it for a joyride and then set it on fire! Lucky for him, they also removed the keys. "Open ignition" is seen as a "miss-use of trust" by some Ins. Cos., and they won't pay!
      cherylpdcg
      • 3 Months Ago
      If you are not using SecureStart on your vehicle there is a 99% chance your vehicle or boat will be stolen. What is SecureStart? It is a security device placed in the vehicle that allows only programmed fingerprint users to start your vehicle or boat. Go to www.globalbiometricstechnology.com to purchase your SecureStart Finger Print Starter. Here is how it works!! (1) The Finger Print Starter uses fingerprint recognition to start your engine. (2) Only authorized persons can start, move or drive your vehicle or boat. (3) Unauthorized persons/fingerprint WILL NOT start your engine. It’s that simple folks!! www.globalbiometricstechnology.com
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