• Jan 6, 2011
A group of Danish designers have come up with an aftermarket device engineered to help drivers keep tabs on their level of fatigue. Called the Anti-Sleep Pilot, the hockey-puck sized piece of tech calculates just how tired the driver is by monitoring a total of 26 different parameters. Multiple profiles can be stored inside, and each driver is made to take a brief test to determine their own personal risk of falling asleep at the wheel. From there, the Anti-Sleep Pilot issues occasional alertness tests wherein the driver is required to touch the device on command.
The Anti-Sleep Pilot also makes use of an accelerometer and a clock to determine how fast the vehicle is moving. If the driver becomes too fatigued, visual and audio warnings will emanate from the device until the driver stops for a ten-minute break. We'd suggest getting a coffee...

It's worth nothing that the Anti-Sleep Pilot does not use cameras to track the driver's eyes, unlike other systems currently on the market. Right now, the Anti-Sleep Pilot is only available to Danish customers, but buyers of other nationalities can pre-order the device for $250. Check out the device's site for more information.

[Source: Gizmag]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 8 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      A device that buzzes until I stop and take a 10minute break... No thanks. Maybe in a fleet vehicle or something.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Worth nothing, or worth noting?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Nothing, as pucks are completely worthless.

        What's up with Zack pulling most of the sillies?
        • 4 Years Ago
        I saw a video of this demoed at CES this week. Looks interesting but I'm not sure that it doesn't operate more as a driving distraction because of the interaction the thing requires in order to determine how sleepy you are.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The spell/grammar checkers must still be on holidays at Autoblog...
        • 4 Years Ago
        Maybe they need to stop for coffee (and a danish) themselves?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Seems like it would be more annoying and distracting than helpful, but what do I know, I'm typing this on my phone while I sleeping and driving.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is actually a good feature for sleepy drivers.