• Dec 16, 2010
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is slowly unveiling the results of the freshly updated five-star New Car Assessment Program, and not all 2011 models are faring so well. USA Today reports that the 2011 Honda Civic is the latest such victim after the popular compact sedan received an overall score of three stars; down one star from the 2010 model year. The Civic's score was downgraded due in part to a woeful side impact score of two stars. The female crash-test dummy on the passenger side reportedly netted a four-star score, but the male crash-test dummy driver managed but two stars. On the upside, the Civic netted four-star ratings for front crash and rollover risk.

The Civic isn't the only popular vehicle among the 55 models tested that hasn't fared so well in testing. The Toyota Camry and Honda CR-V were also rated at three stars, while the Nissan Versa received only two stars. Luckily for Honda, a newly refreshed Civic is on the way for the 2012 model year.

[Source: Inside Line]


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  • 49 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Stop buying these cheap pieces of Japanese crap and get a real car.
        • 4 Years Ago
        FWIW, I don't think Japanese cars have been cheap since the early 1990s.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Remaining supporters of Honda:

      [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufsf_-a_H9Q[/url]
      • 4 Years Ago
      Meh, it's still an IIHS top safety pick, and I've always preferred the IIHS to the NHTSA. I'm sure the next generation will do better on the new NHTSA test, but I'm not losing sleep over driving a 2011 Civic Si that got an IIHS "top safety pick" award and scored 4 and 5 stars (depending on the angle) under the previous NHTSA test.
      • 4 Years Ago
      How did the Cruze fare?
      • 4 Years Ago
      jeez the new NHSTA standards must be really difficult. I think I've seen 2 models get 5 stars. The cars that were so highly praised by IIHS & NHSTA before are getting 2-3 stars.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Wait.... what? I saw a picture of a Honda Civic and totally thought I was going to witness yet another Honda recall....this just ruined my day.
      • 4 Years Ago
      is anyone surprised? it's like the oldest model in its class (which is why honda's readying a new one). besides, it's acura honda touts as doing well in tests, rarely their bread and butter brand. reliability? sure that's a priority for honda buyers. class leading safety? nah.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I realize this is Autoblog, and they like to single out and generate negative Honda threads...but I see no mention of the much newer, larger Mazda 3 earning identical side and lower frontal.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Good point Zamifir, do you remember the day when people preferred to buy the established "gone through" model???

        I have determined what Honda is doing. Their market research shows that for the most part their buyers are seeking reliability and function and this is an older marketplace. They are catering to this fact, however they are forgetting that this was built on some great fun cars, especially with Acura.

        Their business plan seems to be focusing on current market buyers loyal to them, however not thinking about attracting the future. They will ultimatley end up like Buick in that regard.

        I hope they have a management change. This is the only chance for maintaining their market share.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No, Autoblog does no such thing. But they pretty much just report what another site has reported. I'm not sure anyone else has done anything on the 3. But feel free to send them a tip and they'll do a report on it.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Ahhhh... to be a Civic owner, again. And a woman!
        • 4 Years Ago
        wait, you want to be a woman again?
      • 4 Years Ago
      This doesn't surprise me at all, Honda/Acura has been bragging about their test scores in the past years and many people have argued that they were high because Honda designed the cars to pass the test, not real world safety. The second the test changed so did the results, this just proves that claim. In my mind, the safest cars still only come from a handful of brands, mostly from Europe.
        • 4 Years Ago
        How does ONE old car getting 1 less star with a newer, more stringent test mean that Honda designs their cars to pass the test (or does it moreso than any other automaker)? Ugh. And actually the safest car apparently is the Accord since it's the only one that got 5 stars in all the categories. Last I checked, the Accord isn't from Europe.
      Kevin
      • 4 Years Ago
      You know what I find interesting? What I find interesting is since the Obama regime "purchased" controlling shares in GM and Chrysler, all of a sudden you see recalls about Toyota, and Honda, arguably GM and Chrysler's staunchest competitors. Further, in the "best cars of the year" categories, we now -- in the last two years -- have seen a Dodge, and several GM models which to my memory were NEVER rated this high. Coincidence? I think not. Now, what were previously highly rated safe vehicles are now only garnering 2 or 3 stars. Again, the coincidence is just too glaring for me to overlook.

      And before anyone jumps down my throat, I have driven GM's and Toyotas almost my entire driving "career" which is over 30 years now. I've always thought -- with the exception of maybe the late 70's early 80's -- that American cars were every bit as good as the Toyotas, Hondas, et al out there. What I'm saying here is the media dogged American carmakers... until the government "bought" two of them. Think about it people. Don't believe everything you read.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is all well and good, improving the crash score system so that cars get safer, but this will most likely mean that the cars will get larger and heavier to meet the new standards. I don't foresee them using titanium cross members to protect the passengers compartment anytime soon.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @sportbike,

        Dear whiny dumbass: said post has already been put up. Please pay attention.


        http://www.autoblog.com/2010/11/11/nhtsa-releases-second-batch-of-crash-test-ratings-under-new-syst/

        Both the Accord's score and that the Sonata was revised are in there.

        By the way, the Sonata was revised to get 5-stars, not to just pass, which it did with the first revision. They apparently want 5-stars in every TEST, which the Accord did not do, though it did get 5 in every CATEGORY.
        • 4 Years Ago
        And no doubt we won't see an article from Autoblog about THAT.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I think it's bad news, because it'll just make newer cars much heavier. Either that, or engineers will find some shortcuts to cater their newer cars to this latest testing methodology.

        trustedcarsalesman: I always chuckle at how the mere mention of "German" evokes some outright irrational sense of superior quality. One GT-R grenades its tranny on an online forum? That must mean every single GT-R has a terrible transmission. A Porsche sputters and DIES on a road test comparo in Motor Trend? An outlier that should be ignored, of course.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No doubt, you will NOT see a positive article at Auto(Hyundai)Blog about the Honda Accord aceing that test.

        Nor will you see how Hyundai is on revision THREE of their new car in an attempt to pass the test.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @trustedcarsalesman: Funny. The redesigned-in-2008 Accord is safer than any German car tested so far.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Not necessarily- most german cars will pass this test with flying colors.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I drove Volvo's for years, had 5 of them. Didn't feel extra safe in them due to the narrow tires and wheels the factory provided and their alarming tendency to roll in corners. As the swedes inported more and more "guest workers" from places where oxcarts were the norm the quality went down and the price went up. Tried the "other" Swedish car company, handeled better but a nightmare to work on. The engine on the first series 900's was in BACKWARDS, with the alternator, water pump, power steering pump, and "air con" compressor up against the firewall, and the non-turbo versions were slower than death. Switched to a "well known Japanese car company". My extensive metric tool collection is pretty much unemployed these days, and I don't feel any less safe. Ford bought Volvo, GM bought SAAB, and I doubt either of them is any more safe than the same size car built by their "owners" Now that they have both been sold off, perhaps the new owners will change things.
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