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2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study – Click above for high-res image gallery

DuPont has rolled out its annual Automotive Color Popularity Report, and it looks like the long-reigning king may be under threat from a new foe. Silver held the most popular color title for seven years until 2007, when it was dethroned by the likes of white and white metallic. That trend carried over for 2008, but in 2009, silver took its place in the spotlight once again. Now it looks like black may be staging a comeback. This year, of all the cars sold around the world, 26 percent went home with a silver paint job, but 24 percent rolled out of the factory with a black coat of shiny.

Meanwhile, white, white pearl and grey soaked up just 16 percent of all cars sold in 2010. Dupont says that black's popularity is largely propelled by the color's success in markets outside of the U.S., where noir doesn't quite have the same swagger as elsewhere. In fact, here in North America, white retained its popularity with a three percent lead over black and a four-percent jump over silver.

And what about the least popular color of the year? That one goes to yellow and gold, with just 1 percent of all new vehicles swaddled in the color of sunshine and the 70's. Hit the jump for the full press release. Hat tip to Brent!


  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study

  • 2010 DuPont Automotive Color Popularity Study



[Source: DuPont]
Show full PR text
DuPont Says Silver, Black in Race for World's Most Popular Car Color

2010 DuPont Global Automotive Color Popularity Report Includes South Africa for First Time;

Protection of Color Represented in This Year's DuPont Color Trend Show

WILMINGTON, Del., Dec. 7, 2010 – Silver and black are in tight competition for the title of "world's most popular car color," according to DuPont. As the global automotive coatings leader, DuPont issued its 58th Global Automotive Color Popularity Report today, which includes automotive color popularity information and regional trends from 11 leading automotive regions of the world. Each year, the DuPont report reflects data from established and emerging growth markets in the automotive industry; and in 2010, for the first time, includes trends from South Africa. DuPont's study is the original and most comprehensive report on global automotive color popularity and remains the first of its kind compiled on a global basis.

Only two percentage points separate silver from black as the leading vehicle color globally, and black's popularity in key automotive markets outside of North America is substantial. White and gray are tied for third place, with gray's popularity increasing three percentage points from last year's survey. Red, the only non-neutral color in the top five, is increasing in popularity, taking the fifth spot on the global color popularity rankings. The top 10 global vehicle colors are as follows:

1. Silver – 26 percent
2. Black/Black Effect – 24 percent
3. White/White Pearl and Gray – 16 percent each (tie)
5. Red – 6 percent
6. Blue – 5 percent
7. Brown/Beige – 3 percent
8. Green – 2 percent
9. Yellow/Gold – 1 percent
10. Others – <1 percent


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 63 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Silver" vs. grey is a matter of semantics, so how are they counting these? All silvers are technically shades of grey, and shades like Mazda's Liquid Silver, Suzuki's Platinum Silver, Audi's Monza Silver, etc., are as dark as those that get labeled as grey. Basically, grey beats black and white, and apparently people all over the world are terrified of actual colors.
      • 4 Years Ago
      So it's gray, black and gray... Gray/silver is an automotive version of computer world beige. Which being taken over, yes, you guess it, by black.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Russians disproportionally like green, and Latin Americans disproportionally like red.
      • 4 Years Ago
      You know, some of us don't have a choice. The car we wanted, there was only one available in our area--and it was in silver. We needed a car then and couldn't wait for them to bring the color we wanted to our area.

      My husband wanted blue or black, I wanted orange. :(
      • 4 Years Ago
      As Clarkson and Co. pointed out: those are *not* colours. Those are *tones*. What kind of mind designs a beautiful, innovative, or eye-catching shape, then decides "I know! I'll make it so you can't see it!"

      One reason I miss TVR: they had the guts to make cars two *colours* at the same time in the same place.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Born and raised in the Northeast MA and having lived in Cleveland and Detroit. I have always owned Black cars. When we retired we moved South * we never purchased another Black car. Every time we got in the black car and went some where I ended up singing *Chestnuts Roasting on an open Fire*.
      Carlos
      • 4 Years Ago
      Silver is so blah, most silvers don't have much depth to them and are just so vanilla.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        Yup. Silver to me just says no imagination, especially in any premium car. People are lemmings...
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        How can anyone hate silver? It is so classy and easy to keep clean. To me it's yellow that I do not like.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        @shiftright: How does that make sense? Buying a red car or seeing a red car as red doesn't take any imagination. :S
      • 4 Years Ago
      In SoCal, silvers and metallic grays seems to be 50%, with black 45% and the rest showing some imagination.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's kinda hard for reds or blues to become popular when some manufacturers don't even bother offering them on certain models or at an upcharge...
      ...and when dealers take un-spoken for allocations in either Silver w/ Black, Grey w/ Grey or Black w/ Black.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Often the red or blue isn't even a nice shade. They tend to offer bright red on sedans to make them look sporty, but no classy maroon.

        Interior colors are equally pathetic. Some models only offer black!
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ tributetodrive - strange, since in Japan red is the color often associated with the heroic figure in their culture.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Interesting how South Africa, Europe, Japan favor blue over red. Everyone else favors red over blue.... Not sure it means anything...
      • 4 Years Ago
      You can have it any color as long as it is black - Henry Ford.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Black (and other dark colors) are the largest pain in the rear to keep looking good. Black does indeed look like nothing else when it's freshly clean/waxed/polished, but then the dirt specks start showing up. And the little scratches. Road salt. Dings. Most of the time, the vehicle looks dirty.

      Silver, white, etc are much easier to maintain and look better more of the time. My car is silver and is 8 years old at this point. I have a few scratches and dings, but they aren't nearly as noticeable and the ones on my wife's 3 year old car, which is dark blue and just looks old, despite any attempts by yours truly to keep the paint in good shape. Harsh weather and dirt just have too much time with the car.

      We also live in an area with regular water rationing in the summer. Last summer I was able to wash the cars (in the driveway) twice before a ban on all outdoor water use was imposed. The ban ended up lasting all summer and into fall.
      • 4 Years Ago
      We need more color on the road. The lack of color and the real world lack of cars/trucks that evoke positive emotion may be the reason for trends in depression. Seeing that same monotone wall of boring cars every day is taxing.

      We need more color.
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