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Think City – Click above for high-res image gallery

Think North America has kicked off assembly of its City electric car at its plant in Elkhart, IN. The battery-powered two-seater was slated to start production in early 2011, but Think is steaming ahead and expects the first batch of its American-made City cars to whiz out of the factory by the end of the month. Right now, some 220 electric Citys are lined up in rows at the Elkhart plant. All of the vehicles are in various stages of completion, but Think expects that each and every one of them will roll out the doors before year's end.

Who's in line for these cars? Most of the current City buyers are corporate fleets. Indianapolis-based Energy Systems Network is looking to purchase 200 of the initial run of Citys for its Project Plug-IN program. In 2011, Think promises that production levels will increase to 2,000 to 3,000 vehicles, most of which will also head out for fleet duty. Then, by late 2012, the U.S. public will finally get its first crack at buying the Think City.

Currently, Think utilizes 65,000 square feet of its Elkhart facility. Eventually, the automaker plans to scale up operations and make use of the entire 205,000 square-foot assembly plant. Right now, production in Elkhart is what we would call "final assembly." Vehicles are shipped from Finland as gliders (i.e., without parts of the powertrain) and given their EnerDel batteries and other U.S.-sourced components in Indiana. Whether it's production or final assembly doesn't really matter to us, since we're just plain thrilled to hear that Think Citys will be hitting U.S. streets any day now. Hat tip to Neil and Mart!




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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Trivia: Think has been around for nearly 20 years now and they've built more of these latest Think City models than every other model of vehicle they've ever produced.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Eric, What lead you to write, "by late 2012, the U.S. public will finally get its first crack at buying the Think City."? The articles I have read and video I watched said they should be for sale to the public Summer 2011 or end of 2011, for example http://aftermarketbusiness.search-autoparts.com/aftermarketbusiness/Distribution/International-Newsmaker-QampA-Brendan-Prebo/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/696528?contextCategoryId=41884

      finder, The think will cost $34,000 before tax credits.
      • 4 Years Ago
      " Then, by late 2012, the U.S. public will finally get its first crack at buying the Think City."

      Fiat plans on offering a 500 EV in the same time frame. It will be interesting to compare the two.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It may seem hard to believe that they can get it up & running that fast but the assembly of that Think car is much easier than a typical car. It is like snapping together a lego toy. So they don't have typical assembly line like most cars. It was designed as a relatively low volume car with not many different assembly stations. It is wise of them to get it up & running quickly so they can beat others to market and collect on the tax-credits.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is good news, I've always been cheering for the Th!nk. I understand the benefits of the colored plastic body panels but I wonder if it would help the Th!nk City be taken as a more serious contender if it had the paintable composite body panels like the big OEMs use.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Sorry, should have read "self-colored composite body"
        • 4 Years Ago
        Stew, you're probably right that people are a bit suspicious of the composite body. But I think it is brilliant, one of the Think's most attractive features. I hope Think will keep it, and that the big OEMs learn from this little company.
      • 4 Years Ago
      in my opinion it will have a hard time against the Leaf and the Mitsubishi I. The "Think" looks like a NEV and while the body may be durable the "little tikes" plastic is going to put off all but the greenest nerd.
      • 4 Years Ago

      How much is the price of Think in the US?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Just under $34000.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Too much. A little more than the Leaf, I believe. They are not going to get many sales until they get the price down but it doesn't look like they are trying to go mass market yet. Just 'fleet sales'.


        Oh . . . and as usual . . . BUILD THE DAMN OPEN MODEL! (The convertible)