• Nov 8, 2010
2011 Nissan Leaf – Click above for high-res image gallery

Automotive News' Hans Greimel posted a piece of interest last week titled "Why EV drivers should worry about Big Brother" (sub. req.). Greimel explains that, at least for electric vehicle (EV) drivers, the "all-seeing eye of Big Brother knows where you've been" and suggests that an EV's connection to the Internet holds the potential to open the door to a host of additional privacy concerns. The Internet connection that Greimel touches on is primarily used to monitor the vehicle's location, charge status and driving range, but, at least in theory, could allow Big Brother to track the car's every move. Greimel opens the article with this:
Imagine an Orwellian future where faceless international corporations track your every move. Drop by the bar after work, call in sick to go to the beach, visit your mistress' house. The all-seeing eye of Big Brother knows where you've been.
While the advanced systems found in EVs are designed to assist drivers of battery-powered autos in locating charging stations and to help them adjust their driving style to extract maximum range, it's not much of a stretch to imagine how this could quickly become a tool for collecting personal data and tracking a vehicle's whereabouts – to collect road taxes, for example. The ability to collect and store this data is already in place, as is a pledge to keep this information confidential, but what's to say that a judge won't summons this information to help convict someone of a crime or that a lawyer's request to see vehicle history records, as they pertain to a multi-million dollar lawsuit, will always be denied?



Photos copyright ©2010 Sebastian Blanco / AOL

[Source: Automotive News – sub. req.]


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