• Oct 26, 2010
Underground Racing Lamborghini Gallardo crashes at the Texas Mile – Click above to watch video after the jump

The Texas Mile had scary moment last weekend when a twin-turbocharged Lamborghini Gallardo built by Underground Racing left the track at well over 100 mph. Driver Richard Holt was attempting to pilot the machine to a new standing mile world record, though once his parachute opened to slow the car, the Lamborghini veered off of the course, clipped a small wall and catapulted end over end. Miraculously, Holt walked away from the incident after being cut free from the wreckage by rescue workers. He was later observed at a local hospital before being released.

Reports peg the modified Gallardo as packing somewhere between 1,500 and 1,900 horsepower. Holt actually passed the mile marker at 235 mph and it's suggested that a crosswind is to blame for the sudden change of direction upon the chute's deployment. Accidents like this one underscore the value of conducting high-speed runs in authorized locations with plenty of rescue workers on hand. Hit the jump to watch a video of the entire run.

[Sources: Dragtimes, Small World News Service]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 72 Comments
      Walter
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why did they deploy a chute?? I've been up to that speed on a motorcycle zx14 and letting off the fuel brings you down to 150 pretty fast then light braking brings you back to 100 safely.

      Run out room people!!! Combination of crosswinds, and too large of chute may a toy out of this car.

      Too bad........ hope the injuries were minimal ??
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Walter
        Who's got a big BS flag I can throw up for this guy?

        First of all, unless you show us a video of you doing this or a picture of the GPS you were using, there's no way in hell you ever did 235mph.

        Secondly, there's a difference between bikes and cars. It's called physics. A car weighs more, meaning just letting off the gas isn't going to work. Plus, with a bike, you can let the transmission slow you down.

        This is the Texas Standing MILE and is done on a runway. After that mile is up, there's not much room to where you can just let off the gas and coast to a safe speed.

        Also, as already explained by numerous other people, this wasn't caused by a crosswind. If it were, the chute would of been going to the right after it was deployed, which it wasn't.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Who has money to play with or throw away like that???????
      • 4 Years Ago
      I wouldn`t have even flown my plane in that cross wind at 127mph let alone 235
      • 4 Years Ago
      To me, it seems like the chute caught that second side causing the Lambo to duck hook to the right like that. Just my .02
      • 4 Years Ago
      This guy should be singing the praises of the engineers from Germany who helped make this car safer than it's predecessor, the Diablo (tube frame). Simply put, Audi's designers also have a hand in "driver walked away". I bet front suspension wasn't modified for parachute addition. Maybe if the car owner had even more $$$?...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why do cameramen always mess up the shot right when the most important part of the video happens? What is so interesting about the sky or ground? Never understood that.

      Anyway, glad to hear the driver is ok.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Really cheezy intro titles. So *dramatic.*
        • 4 Years Ago
        I know. Then, they put their special watermark on the video, as if the shaky zoomy video is anything to be proud of. I'm surprised there's no thrash metal playing over the video.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Scary.
      Jeff Leonard
      • 4 Years Ago
      As a long-time observer of speed events and racing in general, all such record attempts are inherently risky. More so than the usual racing event. Some days, the participants have to have enough sense to walk away and wait for another day, as the prevailing conditions (cross winds, etc) make a bad outcome that much more likely.
      • 4 Years Ago
      and your Top Fuel Dragster argument is flawed. They don't use brakes because their weigh distribution is crap and the have purposefully lighter/weaker brakes to cut down on rotational mass/help acceleration. There's probably even an aero concern as they're open, skinny wheeled up front. It's not about 250 mph being too much. Nascar and F1 both use traditional disc brakes reliably.
      • 4 Years Ago
      just because you can afford it, doesn't mean you know what to do with it
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yes, because Micheal Schumacher never crashed. The fact that he was in full safety gear and had a rollcage installed makes me think he had a pretty good idea of what he was doing. Maybe should have paid more attention to the wind gusts, but this is not a case of more money than brains.
        • 4 Years Ago
        DRIVER ERROR

        DUMB ENOUGH To drive in those conditions !!

      • 4 Years Ago
      The fact that Holt is okay says a lot about the strength of the Gallardo's tub. And yes, the run should have been done under less windy conditions.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Bobby - The front lost traction? It doesn't work that way, parachutes increase rear lift, not rear downforce. The top half of the parachute scoops in clean air and the bottom half is partially covered by the silhouette of the car, and thus the parachute rises(increasing lift) since there is more drag at the top than the bottom. If there is too much lift, then the rear tires will obviously lose traction, and the rear of the car will swing one way or the other. This is a well known potential side effect of a parachute, especially if installed incorrectly(not the case here). You might think that the huge amount of drag from the parachute would keep the rear of the car in line even after the loss of traction, but the weight of the car moving side to side can overcome the amount of drag from the chute(as it did in this case).
        • 4 Years Ago
        *strength of the rollcage
        • 4 Years Ago
        RyTrapp0, thanks for the clarification. I always "assumed" the chute itself cause downward pressure on the rear end when applied but depressing the brake system kept the front end down as the car slowed proportionately. I can see where the aero dynamics as you explain would work as prescribed. My logic was working in reverse, much appreciated..
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