• Oct 24, 2010
2011 Ford F-150 – Click above for high-res image gallery

Through the first nine months of 2010, the auto industry is on pace to increase sales by 10 percent versus 2009, and pickup trucks are leading the charge. Bloomberg reports that bedded haulers are up 14 percent on the year, led by increased demand from the farming industry. Farmers have seen their revenues increase by $9 billion over last year, with both prices and demand rising in part because of droughts in Russia and Canada. Farmers are using their new-found dollars to invest in their businesses, and trucks are among the biggest and best tools in the box barn.

Automakers are beneficiaries of this investment, as truck sales climb and profits soar. Analyst Joe Barker of IHS Automotive claims that automakers can make up to $15,000 on each pickup sold, a figure that holds firmest when incentives are down. And with sales up, incentives have dipped. Edmunds shows that trucks have an average MSRP of $34,235, or about $2,000 higher than in 2009. Supply and demand really does work.

The biggest recipient of the increased demand for pickups has so far been Ford, which has seen its F-Series pickups jump by 31 percent. Chevy Silverado sales are up 17 percent as well. Even the Toyota Tundra, which has struggled in the U.S. market, is up 21 percent. The Ram appears to be the only truck suffering through the pickup truck boom, with sales down one percent year-over-year.



Live photos copyright ©2010 Jeremy Korzeniewski / AOL and Ford Motor Company

[Source: Bloomberg]


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  • 32 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      On average I spend a few days each month driving 2011 Ford F Series trucks. Lately many of them have the new diesel/auto combination. Very impressive.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Bought a 2010 F150 Lariat - LOVE IT! Thanks Ford!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Congrats ....I want a LARIAT, but I'm a subsidized farmer and I'm still running with two Ford Rangers y2k
      • 4 Years Ago
      What about the Titan?
        • 4 Years Ago
        What is this "Titan" you speak of?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Subsidies for crops-to-fuel programs surely help to rejuvenate economy. In the short run.. You certainly can feed a car with corn, but you can't quench your kids hunger with Ethanol.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I guess this contradicts the opinion of many Autobloggers that no one who drives a truck actually needs it and that they are only buying it to compensate for something.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I think that's an opinion of an uneducated, misinformed minority. I'd say the majority of Autobloggers believe in buying what you believe you need. Actually, pretty much just buying what you want, within your budget.

        Would I buy a pickup? No. But maybe I will one day. Right now, I have no use for one, and it'd be inconvenient to drive around such a large vehicle for my usual tasks. I also don't like the truck ride, but that's a personal preference. I have no problem with people who love trucks as their daily. More power to 'em.

        I think diversity in the auto scene is a beautiful thing... some who otherwise say they believe in "diversity" would have everyone driving the same grey box that is following the fad "green" technology of the day, thinking the same thoughts, saying the same things.
      Real Time
      • 4 Years Ago
      Dodge sales are down because Dodge pickups are only good for the droids in the suburbs to drive back and forth to their cubicles. If you try working a Dodge on the farm or jobsite. Like you would a Chevy or a Ford, you soon find that they will not hold up.If you have any rough terrain, or highways, the front end of Dodge trucks will need replaced at least yearly. You cannot keep tires on the front end of a Dodge.
      Ever try to trade a Dodge in on another truck? You will leave the dealer feeling insulted, but really leave mad when DODGE wont even give you a decent trade in on their own stuff!
        Real Time
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Real Time
        Keep the Ram about 5 years and then go trade it off....I have been there myself and also seen it with several others. I have friends who just drive their Dodges to a parking lot, where it sets for eight hours, while they make their living. They cannot keep front tires on them as the frame on a Dodge Truck flexes going down the road. You cannot keep the front end aligned on them. You will have to sell your Ram to an individual, because a dealer, especially Dodge, will not want it and their offer will show it. Stay away from the "as cheap" Toyota's as well. Its another truck with a poorly built frame. I dont climb boulders, but I do have to drive on some things beside asphalt and concrete and I too have to enter those store parking lots that are a different height than the road.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Real Time
        Have you considered that not everyone who needs to haul things also has to climb over boulders? We have a Ram as the City Sign Shop truck, and it works fantastically.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Ford F-150 claims best fuel mileage, but the true is Chevy's is higher
      Ford is laying out a heady boast: it's F-150 pickup will be the most fuel-efficient full-size truck from any maker. With its V-6 engine , F-150 is expected to achieve 16 miles per gallon in the city and 23 mpg on the highway. Just one problem: Ford's boast doesn't appear to be true. The Environmental Protection Agency says 2011 Chevrolet Silverado Hybrid pickup is even better: 20 mpg in the city, the 23 mpg on the highway. Just another false claim: how far will they go?
      • 4 Years Ago
      i'd like to hear from all those smartasses who were bitching about US automakers still relying so much on trucks
        • 4 Years Ago
        They ARE (or at least were) relying too much on trucks, what is there to argue about?

        No one is saying to STOP making trucks... Detroit makes a great truck. The point is that you shouldn't be relying on them as your only source of income like they had done since the ~80s.

        ...something something all your eggs in one basket something something...

        Oh yeah, and all this talk of truck sales increasing at a higher percent than cars sales are conveniently forgetting that truck sales were also down much more than car sales were last year and the year before. If anything, pickup sales are in the process of recovering, but most other trucks (namely SUVs) are still down.
        • 4 Years Ago
        So you believe that had the automakers never made anything other than trucks, that they'd still be around? (let's assume that there were no bailout opportunities)
      • 4 Years Ago
      I have a carpentry business and the F-250 is our truck of choice. We got a brand new one this year and it gets the job done RIGHT! Thank you Ford for making my job a hell of a lot easier and for making an outstanding truck.
        • 4 Years Ago
        People on this site like to complain about "Government Motors" i.e. GM, but why don't they talk about "Government Corn"?

        The agrarian economy shouldn't be booming. There's enough fat people.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Bill, cows DO eat corn, not just grass and hay. They eat it in silage and in milled feed.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ocnblu
        Cows may eat corn but its not a natural part of their diet, its something humans have introduced to their food supply.

        I think that cows should stop being fed corn in feedlots and we should go back to GOOD grass-fed beef (grass-fed beef is better than feedlot corn-fed beef I believe)
        • 4 Years Ago
        Corn isn't exactly a Chinese staple food. Government shouldn't subsidize corn to point where it grown at a lost before subsidies. For what? To feed China?

        Fix my roads. Increase highschool graduation rates... anything, but don't subsidize corn. Cows eat grass, not grain and sugar tastes better than high fructose corn syrup.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The comedy of ethanol, and the curse of high fructose corn syrup, as well as all manner of corn-based products are indeed the consequence of our government's close ties to Big Corn. Why do we keep subsidizing it? Privatize profits, socialize losses. It's a pity very few people see this.

        It's a false boom... and false booms always collapse in a spectacular and painful fashion at some point in the future.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Re "enough fat people" - apparently not in China yet. The US exports a lot of ag commodities.
        • 4 Years Ago
        A fair bit of corn gets made into Ethanol.
        • 4 Years Ago
        To jonwil2002: You do know that corn IS a grass, right? And please don't tell me cows would not eat corn if left to their own devices. I've been in a cornfield in the middle of the night trying to get cows OUT and back into their pasture when they found a weak spot in the electric fence.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Nobody had mentioned that the article says they make approx $15,000 profit on each truck sold and the average price is $34,000 each which is almost 100% mark-up. Talk about price gouging, that is in-sane.
      • 4 Years Ago
      2011 Ford F-150 is awesome, now I am so eager to take it to my farm.


      _______________________
      http://www.trucksntruck.com
      • 4 Years Ago
      This ag economy hasn't hurt John Deere either.
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