• Oct 14, 2010
Hmm, that doesn't seem centered anymore – Click above to watch video after the jump

Working with a car on a lift can be a dangerous if you don't understand what you are doing. Procedures have to be followed and safety is the name of the game. As one very lucky mechanic learned, even when something looks centered on a lift, it may not be safe.

Timing is, as we often hear, everything in life. The guy in this video should feel pretty good that the other person came in to talk to him. Otherwise he might have been the meat in a Dodge Ram/Concrete floor sandwich. Slip off the jump to see why garage lifts require that you always stay alert when a vehicle is in the air. Thanks for the tip, IHateAirplanes!

[Source: Youtube]



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  • 69 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      That should buff right out...
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually, in this case, that might be true. It seemed to of not landed hard on the side. So a replacement side-view and a nice slight repaint would do the job.
        • 4 Years Ago
        as long as i get that racing exhaust in man haha
      • 4 Years Ago
      Oh so this is why I pay for insurance..
      • 4 Years Ago
      WHAT KIND OF LIFT COULD DO THAT!!!!!

      Less caps next time, promise.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I guess the owner of that truck is going to...*puts on glasses*...need a lift.

      YEEEEEEAAAAAHHH!
      • 4 Years Ago
      My next question is how does one go about removing an upside down 6,000 lb truck from a single garage bay? I guess you would just have to drag it out.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Probably. It's already totaled at that point, so why not?
      • 4 Years Ago
      WHY DID YOU TURN?!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Lucky guy. It also made me happy inside because I really hate those lifted pickups.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Holy crap, this has to be one of the luckiest S.O.Bs ever.
      Seconds away from being dead as a doornail.
      • 4 Years Ago
      If you watch the video, right before the truck falls you can see something fly out from under the truck and hit the floor. My guess is that it's one of the flip up feet on the lift.

      Those feet aren't meant to hold a 7,000 lb truck. They work fine on cars, but when you put too much weight on them they snap off and then the vehicle falls 3-4", which can be (as in this case) enough to throw the whole mess of balance.

      These lifts are fine as long as you use wooden blocks instead of flipping the metal feet up to support the frame.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, Chris. They had all center posts back in Michigan when I was young, and they were fine except when they got weird and twisted as the car went up.

        But the new style lifts are far cheaper. You don't have to dig a pit to install the ram, and you can get one that's far less complex that just uses jackscrews.

        Out here in California, they use all the multi post-type lifts, some places even use them outdoors, that's how easy they are to install.

        The jack in this case didn't fail, the truck just fell off it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually, using wooden blocks, or makeshift spacers of any kind, is one of the most dangerous things you can do when lifting a vehicle. There is nothing inherently dangerous with an older center post lift, the danger is with users who don't know how to properly place lift points, and with poor maintenance of the equipment. The main reason that the industry has converted over to twin side post lifts is not because of safety, it is just cost. A center post in-ground lift is far more costly and invasive to install.
      • 4 Years Ago
      i remember as a kid, being left in cars while they were hoisted up. i thought it was a circus ride then, but now realize what a foolish mistake it was. i wonder what my dad was thinking.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Our local Shell station has a center post lift (been in operation for like, 70 years). When I was a kid in the 60's the owner wouldn't let anybody in the lift bay or under the lift. I was amazed at how easily a vehicle would turn on the lift which meant that lowering required a gentle hand on the vehicle to make sure it landed true to the bay doors. Those old hydraulic lifts required a deep hole in the ground and in our area, that also means what is a giant hydraulic cylinder buried in water (during the winter high ground water levels). Most modern short 2-3 story elevators use the same principle. When buried, just more cost in making sure the cylinder footing is secure and oil that leaks doesn't get into the water table. More expensive to install.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hello McFly!!!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Its easy to make that mistake, one time i accidently kicked the hoist arm over and lifted the car with only 3 arms. Thankfully nothing happened. But when your lifting anywhere from 3-10 vehicles a day, it becomes almost a routine that you can sometimes assume too much, but with a costly price. That's why I have made sure that after I have lifted the car off the ground a bit that I make sure it's okay.
        Also one time I had to work on a brand new truck that just got an undercoat done, well they put it on so thick that the truck slid back a bit and one of the locks for the arms wasn't working properly and the arm slid off the frame and landed on the running boards. Truck was fine but I was ready to go home because it scared the crap out of me.... Now I don't use that hoist anymore and won't work on vehicles that have recently been undercoated.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's funny how you mention how you always check because last week I was out in the shop using a two post on my Ranger. Now I've have only used the drive-on hoist when I did my oil changes. I lifted up my truck to just get the feet settled when one of the techs comes by and says "The most important thing I do is lift it up a foot and give it a good shake. If it falls a foot no big deal, if it falls on you that is." Those words ring true every time I see a hoist.
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