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2010 Aston Martin DBS Carbon Black – Click above for high-res image gallery

Reports are surfacing once again hinting at possible future collaboration between Mercedes-Benz and Aston Martin. Earlier reports had forecast that the two firms could share engines and even platforms, the aborted Lagonda crossover concept reportedly having been based on the Mercedes GL-Class. Additional reports had further suggested that Daimler was looking at buying stake in Aston, however neither bit of gossip has materialized into anything tangible as of yet.

That could change, however, according to Britain's weekly Autocar magazine, in speaking with Mercedes chief Dieter Zetsche. The affable Dr. Z hinted at possibly sharing technology – the kind of stuff which a small company like Aston couldn't develop on their own – with AML in the future. That could include, of course, anything from airbags and spark plugs to engines and platforms, leaving the door wide open for speculation, so we'll just have to wait and see.

[Source: Autocar]


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  • 32 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hope that works out better than Maybach.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Aston Martin, you might want to have a little chat with ChryCo first...
      • 4 Years Ago
      yes, replace the Ford-sourced steering wheels, please!
        • 4 Years Ago
        & the Volvo nav units.
      • 4 Years Ago
      SLS/AMG inspired Astons, SWEET!!!
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Apex,

        "but Mercedes did not willingly help Chrysler in the 10 years they owned them"
        I couldn't agree more with that statement. I think Daimler is the poster-child of everything you shouldn't do when running a business.

        However, the SLS is far more than a re-skinned Viper. I haven't worked in the auto industry like you, but I have worked for it. A company where I used to be employed did a lot of supplier work for DaimlerChrysler so I had a lot of contact with the engineering departments of both companies. I can't claim to know what management was thinking, but I do know that Benz engineers were genuinely excited about the Viper project because many of them idolized the car. However, they wanted to ensure that the SLS would be much more sophisticated and thus spent millions refining and building upon Chrysler's work. By now, I think even the initial Dodge engineers would have a tough time recognizing the SLS platform as the one they started.

        Also, Cerberus did, in fact, kill the Viper and not Daimler. Autoblog itself was one of the first to report that.

        http://www.autoblog.com/2008/02/08/has-cerberus-killed-the-viper/
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Apex,

        That isn't a correct representation of what happened. Dodge started designing an all-aluminum chassis to underpin the next-gen Viper. Mercedes was simultaneously at work designing an SLR replacement. They learned of the Viper project and piggy-backed onto it (much as VW AG constantly does within its brands). Mercedes took the work on the platform that had already been completed and began moving in a different direction with their own R&D. Dodge engineers, meanwhile, continued with Viper development and were actually helped out by the greater resources that MB brought to the table.

        However, Daimler then sold Chrysler to Cerebrus who wasn't interested in anything but breaking up Chrysler and selling off the pieces. They stopped funding the Viper project and it was shelved, meanwhile Mercedes did funded the SLS project and it came to production. It was still Daimler's fault that the Viper never came to be because if they hadn't sold Chrysler to Cerebrus it likely would be nearing production now. But, they didn't steal anything. Daimler owned Chrysler and simply made use of existing technology rather than inefficiently investing in an identical project. In fact, Chrysler has done the exact same thing by basing the new Grand Cherokee entirely off a chassis designed and developed by Benz. It's how the auto industry works now. There was NO conspiracy here.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Muppethead

        You are partly correct and I was flat wrong. The platform was actually co-developed much in the way the SLS and Viper were to be. Chrysler started the design of the GC platform just as the current generation ML was bowing. Mercedes piggy-backed onto the project because the groundwork was just being laid for the 2012 M-Class. MB contributed the suspension bits to the project along with much of the steering setup. Both were, of course, tuned individually to meet the demands of each maker.

        As such, both will be quite different in reality, just as the Viper and SLS would have been. This type of product design just makes good business sense. Too bad Daimler ran Chrysler like a dictatorship for nearly ten years before new management came in and began allowing stuff like this to occur.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Apex is right , Mercedes did the same thing back in the '50s when they stole the original Viper plans and built the 300 SL !
        • 4 Years Ago
        Porsche 911, you mean: SLS/AMG (2012 Dodge Viper before Daimler stole the design) inspired Astons, SWEET!!!

      • 4 Years Ago
      I see heavier Astons in the future.
        • 4 Years Ago
        yeah but Astons were never LotusLite themselves
      • 4 Years Ago
      If the 6.2 can fit in a C Class, I see no reason it can't fit into a vantage v8, that would be so awesome
      • 4 Years Ago
      As long as they don't do Aston the same way they anal raped the Dodge Viper, I'm okay.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It could be nice, because it could bring some of the R&D cost for Aston Martin, they are lacking the funding for research on things like Direct Injection and DCT. I see no possible reason why 6 liter V12 can't product a hundred horse power per liter. Even in its best form its still only producing 525 horses in the DBS, which i think is a shame for a car costing $250,000. I know horse power isn't everything but apart from the 77, I don't think Aston Martin has a car which does 0-60 in under 4 seconds
      • 4 Years Ago
      Aston Martin is a name synonomous with quality, class and sporty character. Whilst it currently uses parts from the Universal Parts Unlimited Catalogue, it still oozes that special character only found in a British car. Mercedes happily swiped Chrysler bits for some of their cars; today a Mercedes is overstated and not worth the high prices asked for the marque. Keep A-M British and let Mercedes continue to make "Hun omnibuses" as my late grandfather called German automobiles. ( 4 years on the Western Front in WW1 gave rise to some quaint epithets)
      • 4 Years Ago
      be afraid, be very afraid
      • 4 Years Ago
      5.5 biturbo in the V8 Vantage!
      • 4 Years Ago
      I like this idea. As long as Daimler doesn't buy Aston like they did Chrysler things should work out. I've heard that Daimler is actually a very nice company to collaborate with because they have such an enormous R&D budget and are willing to try things even if there is no promise of success. History has taught us, though, that they are anything but nice to work with when they own you.

      Still, the idea of Aston's with more modern engine technology and cutting edge infotainment is enticing. If this does come to fruition I hope it works out.
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