• Oct 7, 2010
Jaguar C-X75 Concept – Click above for high-res image gallery

Remember the Jaguar C-X75 Concept at the Paris Motor Show? Of course you do. The company repeatedly said it was "a pure concept" that wouldn't ever learn what the word "production" meant. Well, along with Galileo, Jaguar is reportedly joining the list of those who took it all back – well, almost – by admitting it's studying the production feasibility of what would become the X-75.

The stats again: Two 96-horsepower micro gas turbines powering batteries which in turn feed a quartet of 195-hp electric motors at the wheels for a shuddering 780 hp and 1,187 pound-feet, a 3.4-second run to 62 miles per hour, a top speed of 205 mph, an electric range of 68 miles and a range-extended blast of 560 miles. Autocar says that although Jag is studying only making 1,000 or 2,000 per year and could charge a fortune for every one of them, it's those turbines that could decide – or more likely, terminate – the car's fate.

See, Jag doesn't want to stick a plain old combustion engine in it. Otherwise it would have to be redesigned because the turbines' small footprint don't allow room for what would need to be a very powerful V8 or a large V12. Even though the company says developing the turbines for production would cost less than doing so for an ICE, it will take up to eight years to get them ready – for even a low-volume item. Of course, we can't imagine Jaguar is going to stand up at the 2016 Paris Auto Show and declare "The six-year-old concept car you loved in 2010 will be here in two more years! Get ready!" As far as we're concerned, we're happy to imagine gas turbines coming in some kind of Jaguar at some kind of date, whenever it is.



Photos copyright ©2010 Drew Phillips / AOL

[Source: Autocar]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Possibly call it the next XJ220
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think some of you didn't read the article. They clearly state why they ARE NOT using a V8 or V12....

      "See, Jag doesn't want to stick a plain old combustion engine in it. Otherwise it would have to be redesigned because the turbines' small footprint don't allow room for what would need to be a very powerful V8 or a large V12."
        • 4 Years Ago
        "What you plan, and what really happens ain't exactly ever been similar." - Jayne Cobb.
      • 4 Years Ago
      very good looking car. I like the turbine concept as well. Maybe they can do something about the rear end tho...
      • 4 Years Ago
      I hope so.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I already own two Jags, but I'll happily make room for this one!
      • 4 Years Ago
      A partnership with Rolls Royce or Pratt & Whitney on a downsized APU would be more expeditious.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I think they would be better off hooking up with a company like Florida Turbine Tech. Look at the amazing work they've done on UAVs in their work on the High Efficiency Turbine.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This concept looks amazing! I'd love to see this come to fruition, regardless of the powerplant. The turbines would be bad-ass, but hey if you can't do it soon throw a twin-turbo six or something similar, price it at around $120-$150k and have yourself a winner!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Jaguar is either full of bull or kidding themselves. Saying putting micro turbines in would be less expensive than an ICE, just would take longer?

      You can get an ICE from companies in no time. And it'll work.

      With turbines you need to design them, then make sure they're safe (no spitting blades), then you have to make them pass emissions, then you have to do piles and piles of reliability testing.

      Jaguar should consider being careful about writing checks they can't cash.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I believe the APU's in the tails of major air liners are all in the 100-500kW range. Those things have seen a LOT of duty doing exactly what they'd need to do here: produce electricity.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ jeff:

        Would they pass emissions?

        Plus, those aren't cheap either.
      Carlos
      • 4 Years Ago
      "The six-year-old concept car you loved in 2010 will be here in two more years! Get ready!"

      Why not? Toyota and Nissan practically did the same thing with the LFA and the GTR or did people forget their extremely long gestation periods?
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Carlos
        Yeah, they forgot them and instead think that the 3yr gestation(typical) of the Camaro was more like a decade.

      • 4 Years Ago
      Of course, we can't imagine Jaguar is going to stand up at the 2016 Paris Auto Show and declare "The six-year-old concept car you loved in 2010 will be here in two more years! Get ready!"

      Umm Audi R8 (Le Mans Quattro). What was that like 10 years???

      Camaro and Challenger also took their sweet little time, as well as the Corvette centennial concept..
        • 4 Years Ago
        To blog readers it feels like forever, but the general public seems to forget about it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        for cars like the Camaro, it felt like 10 years because every day we went on the internet and find some new spy shots and new details about the production version...
      • 4 Years Ago
      I don't care how they do it...just DO IT jaguar!!!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Two micro gas turbines is stupid..one would be enough. 200hp of gas turbine electric generator would not be enough for race track work but would probably be enough for the street or occasional recreational track use.

      Electrical power storage (battery) is key....it would probably take several hundred kilowatt-hour worth of storage capacity to make this 780hp rig workable.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Tiger, you're thinking too practically here. That's cool. We're in the real world and what you're saying makes perfect sense. But for this car? Overkill is necessary, I think. It's outrageous and awesome and beautiful and, damnit, I hope to god it has two of the largest turbines that can possibly fit in it!
        • 4 Years Ago
        @BoxerFanatic,

        Small turbines are very inefficient compared to piston engines even at their peak efficiency - see a specific fuel consumption chart for any such gas turbine. Besides, the microturbine built by Bladon is a single spool, low compression ratio type - fuel efficiency will never be its strength.
        • 4 Years Ago
        whoa whoa whoa! "hundreds of kW-hours"?! What are you basing that on?? 200kWh of li-ion battery would weigh about 4000lbs! 60 miles of electric range would require less than 20kWh. If you're thinking the pack would need to be massive to handle the instantaneous output, well that is a consideration, but by no means would it need to be hundreds of kWh. Li-ion batteries may not have very good energy density, but power density is very very good.
        Take these cells as an example:
        http://www.gaia-akku.com/fileadmin/user_upload/downloads/cells/7%2C5AhUHP_NCA.pdf
        20kWh of these batteries would weigh about 240kg and could put out 550kW for short bursts. I'd say that's about right on.

        About the gas turbines, I'm guessing they went with two smaller ones for packaging reasons.
        These guys build a series hybrid bus using a gas turbine, it's already in service in a number of places, I've seen a few running:
        http://www.designlinecorporation.com/
        • 4 Years Ago
        you apparently don't know super cars very well, when is one ever "enough"?

        who likes twins?

        • 4 Years Ago
        Who said anything about storage? The turbines could power the electric motors directly. Which is the way all cars should be built from now on. The batteries weigh too much and just cause more problems than they solve.

        A small, efficient, diesel engine would perform the same function for cars with less performance requirements.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Also, Chrysler built a turbine car in the 60s and it was silent. You could just barely hear the whine that all turbines have. Plus, it was so balanced at 25,000 RPM that you balance a nickel, on-edge, on the top of the motor.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Part of the appeal of a turbine-generated electric power plant... is that on full demand, the on-board storage would be a buffer, but most of the power would be directly used from the generators to the wheel-driving motors. All four of them. Storage becomes important for driving with the turbines off, starting them, and providing an over-flow buffer for when the turbines generate more than the wheel motors need, in order to fully de-couple the turbine speed from road speed. The turbine power plants would be variable, but would run much closer to steady-state than the road-speed at the wheels, driven by the electric motors.

        It is kind of like a supercar gas-powered variant of a diesel-turbine/electric locomotive, plus start-stop technology to not have the turbine(s) idling needlessly.

        Twin turbines allows each to be smaller in diameter, and easier to package, and redundant, in case one fails.

        Exhaust, especially on a turboshaft that isn't relying on thrust, but rather output shaft RPM and torque... the exhaust can be muffled somewhat, not to mention, it could be mixed with compressor bypass pressurized ambient air, to cool the exhaust output temperatures with an air-to-air diffuser.

        And since when is a supercar supposed to be stealth-quiet? It would be quiet in low-speed maneuvers when the turbines are not needed, and can be shut down, rather than just idled.

        Gas turbine fuel inefficiency comes when they are idled, and still running while not doing anything... Power output per unit of fuel in is pretty good, it just isn't as frugal when idling, because the RPM floor is pretty high, and the engine has to be fed to keep itself running.

        The trick would be to get the turbines to be good, and light enough to be easy to start and stop reliably on demand... and to package just enough battery capacitance on board to handle low-speed, in-town maneuvers, and enough always in reserve to use the generators as starting motors, to fire up the turbines before the batteries are too depleted to do so.

        The larger the turbines or single turbine is, the more energy is required to spin up the heavier compressors and get the turbine running. Another case for two smaller, lighter engines that are easier to quickly start, and stop. Perhaps even just using one of the pair in low-demand charging situations. The power-systems managment computer could track usage hours, and try to balance usage, on occasions where only one of the turbines is needed.

        Plus, if it does make production, there is nothing saying that they can't change the design to run a generator off of a supercharged AJV8, instead of the turbine complexity. It wouldn't be as groundbreaking... Or it could simply be a traditional mid-engined sports car with minimum or no hybrid drive at all, and just cloaked in that sexy bodywork.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I've always though - cost aside - turbines would be the ideal range extenders. Compact, can burn any liquid fuel, and when it's running at its most efficient speeds, very efficient. And in a series hybrid, it can run at its most efficient since it's powering the car indirectly, through the batteries.

        Neat-O!
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Paulinator
        "Who said anything about storage? The turbines could power the electric motors directly. Which is the way all cars should be built from now on. The batteries weigh too much and just cause more problems than they solve."

        Jaguar did: "an electric range of 68 miles".
        Even with 0 all-electric range, you'd still need a large enough battery to buffer out the varying power demand and allow the turbine to run at a more or less constant output. In other words, no that is not "the way all cars should be built from now on", cars aren't freight trains! They have slightly more complicated drive cycles.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Here's a smaller version of the Blandon jets used in C-X75:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLFB4hq6WqM

        imagine how noisy are two such turbines, each a few times more powerful than the one above.

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