• Sep 23, 2010
MV Agusta F3 – Click above for high-res image gallery

The crafty crew over at Hell For Leather managed to get their hands on a scant few photos of the MV Agusta F3. Word is that the wicked new bike will share more than a little blood with the flagship F4, though in place of the time/space-bending 998 cc mill, the smaller bike is likely to employ a slightly more humane engine. Early reports are pointing to either a 600 or 675 cc powerplant, though no one has been willing to throw out a guesstimate on exactly how many ponies the bike will lay down.

From the shots, it's clear that the F3 will be very similar to its more robust sibling, at least aesthetically. While it's possible that the bike in the shot above is simply wearing pre-production bodywork, it's entirely possible that the fairing we see here is what will ride on the retail version. If so, there will be only a handful of differences between the F3 and the F4, as both bikes make use of the same miniscule headlight and tiny tail light.

MV Agusta hasn't yet announced whether or not the F3 will even make it to production, so odds are the company is simply testing the waters with this bevy of spy shots. If you want to see this one in the showroom, best let the company know what you think. We'd hate to see the manufacturer's hard work on its small-displacement model go to waste.



[Source: Hell For Leather]


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  • 16 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Loving the exhaust treatment.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'm really trying to spot it in the pics? Am I blind?
        Can't wait for this bike to be released though, holding thumbs for 3 cylinder like the Daytona.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Wow, looks exactly like every other sport bike out there. Do we really need spy shots? A spec sheet would be more enticing. Nothing new as far as looks go.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It looks small - even for a 600-class. Might just be an overly tall test rider.

      Oh well - I'm not the target market for an MV/Aprillia/Duc/BMW anyway.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This may work out well for MV. When Ducati introduced the 748, many actually preferred it to the 996 for the riding experience. I know I did. The key is to price it significantly lower than the F4. When I purchased my 748 in 1999, it was about $4500 less than the comparable spec 996. I am also wondering if this will be a triple or a four. I thought I had read something about MV looking at a triple.
        mitchell
        • 4 Years Ago
        Its a triple cylinder, 600cc mill, not the 675 that was rumored to be about.

        There is an article over at asphalt&rubber.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I know that I've been eyeing something that's a step up from my SV650, but I'm a little wary of jumping all the way up to a bike that's got 1000ccs or more, so this would be perfect. I also enjoy trying to find something a little more...different...than whatever is popular in a segment, which is why I was a big fan of the Buells. Keep this coming Agusta!

        Speaking of Buells, @scraejtp: the XB series used belt drives, and most of the reviews I read loved that particular aspect of the bikes.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Could not agree more. MV-Agusta would do well to introduce a middle weight sport bike like the F3. Its a way to bring in a much larger audience and increase revenue. I've also heard rumors of a 3 cylinder; might be just speculation based on the name, F3.

        MV-A needs to nail this on the first try though. The middle-weight class is just as if not more competitive than its bigger liter bike brothers. Bikes like the Triumph Daytona, Ducati 848 and the ones from the Japanese big four are all incredibly capable and the riders in this class are just as demanding of excellence as those buying liter bikes.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I will admit to being a big sport bike fan but completely in the dark as to specs and other details. For instance, why are these high performance machines still chain driven? BMW offers shaft drive I believe. The designs look so modern then you see a chain?!
        • 4 Years Ago
        The move should be made to belts for street bikes. Belts can easily handle the power of a liter bike, no maintenance, and unless damaged will last the life of the bike.
        I can understand the argument for true track bikes, as the need for a chain for easy gear changes is necessary.
        • 4 Years Ago
        MotoGP bikes still use chains. Not a single one uses belt or shaft drive.

        Think about it.

        Oh, by the way, BMW's supersport (S1000RR) uses chain drive as well.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yep, the shaft drive is not a good performance option. The 'shaft-jacking' really upsets acceleration.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Chains are more efficient (a smaller percentage of power is lost to friction), much lighter and allow for very easy changes to the gearing. Believe it or not, they're actually superior to shafts in all but service life, which isn't a huge problem on a bike that needs servicing every few thousand miles anyways.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The shaft drive introduces lift on acceleration, and "squat" on deceleration. It's not a problem on the street, but, supposedly is unsettling on a race track. I have an old Honda with a shaft drive, and I can feel the "lift", but only when taking off from a stop. Of course, I can't ride to 99% of my bike's potential, so it doesn't matter to me in the least.
        • 4 Years Ago
        BMW uses a chain on the S1000RR as well. All superbikes uses chains. Sporty tourers are more suited for shaft drive.
      • 4 Years Ago
      And again, you prove to everybody why you rank is THAT low.
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