• Sep 22, 2010
2012 Renault Fluence Z.E. – Click above for high-res image gallery

While Nissan has opted to both sell and lease its Leaf electric vehicle (EV), many other automakers are reluctant to allow their battery-powered vehicles off the lots without customers agreeing to some variation of a lease agreement. Just the other day, we outlined Citroen's lease plans for its C-Zero EV and now we've got wind of Renault's leasing ideas. Renault is expected to sell its EVs, but lease the battery pack for a variable monthly fee. Low-mileage users would pay about £70 a month ($108 U.S. at the current exchange rate) in battery-related fees while high-mileage drivers would be required to dole out a bit more. A Renault spokesperson explained the reasoning behind its decision to lease the battery pack, stating:
Doing that removes any worries about warranties or battery failures. It will make for much better residual values for the cars too. We still expect to be able to make overall ownership of an EV cheaper than a 'normal' car once both fuel and maintenance costs are accounted for.
Renault will reportedly offer a pay-as-you-go contract that will allow lessees to sell the vehicle at any time. This option will cost more, but is does offer a degree of flexibility for those that remain doubtful about whether or not an EV suits their lifestyle. As you might expect, this pay-as-you-go option does present some problems. Renault will have to track ownership of each vehicle and hunt down the party responsible for paying the battery lease costs. To do this, Renault will equip its EVs with a GPRS transponders that allows the automaker to locate the vehicle at any time. And if you're thinking that you could simply pretend to sell the vehicle to a nearby person to avoid paying the battery lease fees, think again. Upon failure to pay the fees, Renault's remote disable feature will kick in, thus rendering the car useless. Hat tip to David!



[Source: Autocar]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      I do not think that any of the future Renault vehicles will reach Non-European/SW Asia areas marketed as a Renault anyways. If they are marketed in North America or Japan, or other areas that Nissan has a larger market share in they will be marketed as Nissans. With this in mind, the policy outside Europe / SW Asia may be different. If I remember correctly, the reason that Nissan did not use this model is that there could be a great deal of legal red tape involved in selling the vehicle and leasing the battery especially in the U.S.. I personally think that people should be given the option of purchasing or leasing the battery.
      • 4 Years Ago
      What's the price of this beauty?

      "Renault is expected to sell its EVs, but lease the battery pack.."

      Since the battery costs 1/3 to 1/2 of the price of the vehicle that means
      that the Renault Fluence Z.E. could be sold at $7500 brand new?

      According to :
      http://green.autoblog.com/2009/12/21/better-places-renault-fluence-ev-to-sell-for-under-20-000/

      This beauty is to be sold at a price lower than $20000 BEFORE incentives.
      So after taking into the equation the $7500 fed rebate and the $5000 CA rebate the price comes down to $7500?!! At that price this is going to be my next car :^)

      And since i'm already paying +$ 80 per month for gasoline,
      leasing the battery at $ 108 per month is not bad at all.

      Lastly no battery status anxiety (failures and year after year degradation)
      since you don't own the battery.

      FF
      • 4 Years Ago
      After tax incentives the new Kangoo is just 15,000 Euros, plus 72/month for the battery lease. The Price without tax incentives is about the same as a comparably equipted ICE model, and a little less in terms of fuel costs. With the incentives, the ZE version is significantly cheaper.

      http://www.renault-ze.com/uk/blog/?p=581
        • 4 Years Ago
        With UK prices for electric at around £0.10kwh, then you would be in profit after perhaps 6,000 miles.
        Commercial vehicles like this are run 5-6 days a week, say for 12,000 miles, so you would be far ahead even before taking into account low maintenance.
        Of course, in London you pay £10/day congestion charge - but not for these.
        They should be able to sell all they can make at this price.
      • 4 Years Ago
      To say I am not thrilled by the idea of having every jouney that is ever made on the records of the car company, and by extension of course the Government, not to mention that both will be able to stop your car for any reason at all, is putting it mildly.
      Any measure of control introduced for one overt purpose is always abused for others.
      Late in paying a parking ticket? Your car does not work.
      Your wife suspects you of an affair? Easy. A private detective will make short work of tracing your every move.
      Want to market a product? Note every journey by the target - if they visit a sports ground, then cue endless sports advertising.
      • 4 Years Ago
      And after some years you could lease a better battery pack with a higher capacity.
      Just imagine. You can easily upgrade your EV as the battery tech is making a huge leap forwards.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The cost is very good. The Zoe is aimed at being the main vehicle for Europe, and is aimed to sell at, from memory, around 14k Euros.
        Anyone who does more than 5-6k miles/year should be in profit, and that is not counting low maintenance costs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It may work in the EU but not in the US. I know of no one that would "lease" part of the car and pay for the rest. Packs need to be part of the ownership cost. as for upgrades, I doubt the packs will be the same size or shape in 10 years.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It wouldn't bother me a bit to have GPRS in a car I'm making payments on or leasing either one. It might even help keep prices low by keeping thieves and scofflaws in check.

      I like the pay-as-you-go option. That says they are very confident in their vehicle and its durability. Not bad lookin' either, eh?