• Sep 11th 2010 at 6:15PM
  • 11
After nine months of meetings, the Electric Vehicles Infrastructure Council created by Connecticut Governor M. Jodi Rell has issued its final report on how to promote the use of plug-in vehicles in the state. The list of proposed incentives covers all of the usual bases but doesn't get too specific about anything.

Unsurprisingly, the outline recommends tax incentives for the purchase of electric vehicles by both individuals and businesses as well as a build-out of the infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. The council recommends installing electric charging stations at state-owned locations, places like office buildings, parks, museums and highway rest areas.

Even if all of these recommendations are implemented, the council projects that plug-in vehicles will only account for about five percent of the vehicles on on the road or 25,000 units in the state by 2020. At least it's a start.

[Source: Bristol Press, Connecticut]


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  • 11 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Well, I am glad to see that the council got it right! Start with plug ins at government buildings and places people are going to visit and stay a while, not curb side or special charge stations where people are expected to wait like they were at a gas station.

      When some people think we should just wait for 5th generation economical batteries, I have to ask how do we get to 5th generation if we don;t start with 1st?
      ammca66564
      • 4 Years Ago
      What a waste of tax money at a time when tax money is scarce and in high demand.

      Electric vehicles are either economically rational, or they're not. They're becoming more so, to be sure. But there's absolutely no need for government to throw money at pushing the curve ahead. It's moving. It will continue to move.

      The benefit of throwing tax money at this is minimal at best.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        D. Sonnier said, "I agree. It's interesting technology, and I hope that it succeeds."
        That is exactly what they said about the ICE as the government was subsidizing the hell out of oil at the turn of the 20th century.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        There are many points to it. It prevents a sudden shock to the economy that will happen if gas suddenly rises fast, it builds up the EV industry, it gets infrastructure in place, it reduces the trade deficit, it reduces pollution, it helps the local utilities, it reduces CO2, it improves national security, etc.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        It is a tax break for those that buy the car, that stimulates the economy.. also people buy a car instead of putting the money under the mattress.. that also stimulates the economy.. plus its Green and that keeps the greenies happy. Its a recessive non-tax so that makes the conservatives happy. Everyone wins

        Putting chargers on the street and parking lots is a waste I think.. giving bussineses a tax break so that they can do the same would not be a waste and a much more efficient way to use tax money. Putting L3 chargers on highways to encourage long distance EV travel is an appropriate use of taxpayer money... or again large tax breaks to do that.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        Oil caries with it many costs not directly fronted by the consumer. Oil spills like we just encountered and our involvement in the middle east and the costs associated with war to protect our national interests are VERY expensive.

        Electric provides a relief to those costs, and is thus deserving of a tax incentive.

        However, throwing around the people's money like its going out of style on a city, state, and national level is going from a reasonable tax incentive to out of control government spending and redistribution of wealth that the already heavily burdened middle-class simply cannot afford and something we can't just add to our spiraling national debt for future generations to worry about (our kids are already under tremendous burden just to pay the interest on our debt).
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        @AMcA "What a waste of tax money at a time when tax money is scarce and in high demand."

        I agree. We are so much better off by spending our money on oil wars and ethonol & big oil subsidies. If we fund both sides of the war and help our military vendors, all the better !
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        I agree. It's interesting technology, and I hope that it succeeds. If it cannot on its own, though, without recourse to yet more tax and spend politics, then it should fail on its own. Our government, both on the national and state level, has taken to believing that the wealth of the nation belongs to them to do with as they please, so said for the good of the people. That wealth belongs to those who create it, to do with as they see fit. The role of government isn't to decide what's best for us. It's to protect us from our enemies, prevent dishonest dealings between the people and between the states. Somewhere along the way, this idea that government knows best crept into a system that worked beautifully because it did so little.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Embarrassing, isn't it? A middle eastern oil kingdom is more grounded in reality and more progressive about this issue than any of us in the western democracies who have succumbed to corruption by their oil elites. Koch brothers uber alles.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The initial investment / infrastructure / volumes of sales / market penetration / economies of scale required for new technology perpetuate the status quo. Put another way it is a self fulfilling prophecy that it is uneconomical to make EVs because none are being made.

      What is the role of the state? Is it not to be able to use public capital to do something that the market will not do, if it is in the greater interest? Regulate seat belts, employ teachers, build bridges are all affairs of the state.

      The question then becomes is it desirable to "seed" the market towards this change in this (these) manners. Is this the bridge to where we should go? If you believe some people (Toyota) that there is insufficient economy of scale, bar technological breakthrough, to make EV's practical then you might be right. Lets wait for the flux capacitor or better battery.

      However others believe that once we make a market for EV's (and support an infrastructure to charge) then there will be no turning back. There will be innovation, competition and sufficient economies of scale so that when the subsidies run out it won't matter anymore, as there will be 10 flux capacitors and/or better batteries improving performance and reducing costs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think a combination of fast chargers and normal rate chargers should be deployed. Normal rate at places that people would stay for 35+ minutes like supermarkets, shopping centres (Malls), Cinemas and hotels etc. The fast chargers should be installed at motorway service stations (highway rest stops) so that people can top up the battery while they stop for bathroom and or food etc. This would allow people to at least have the confidence to make longer trips.

      I recently pre-ordered my UK Leaf. The nearest public slow charging point to my home is 15 miles away located in a supermarket car park. So I contacted my member of parliament (MP) informing him of the rollout of the leaf next March, the current lack of charing points in our area and suggested he inquires why the local county council (State gov) have not applied for any central (federal) government funds that are available to install public charging points.

      “Infrastructure in the early years will need to be delivered by a combination of Central and Local Government and private sector contributions. This is why Government has allocated £20 million as seed money to the ‘Plugged In Places’ electric vehicle infrastructure framework - with up to a further £10m from the Strategic Investment Fund.”