• Sep 10, 2010
2011 Ford F-Series Super Duty – Click above for high-res image gallery

We don't remember feeling at all disappointed when Ford released power figures for its new 6.7-liter Power Stroke diesel engine available in the 2011 Super Duty. After all, who's going to argue with 390 horsepower and 735 pound-feet of torque? Then General Motors published power figures for its new 6.6-liter Duramax Diesel of 397 ponies and 765 stump-pulling lb-ft of twist. Oh snap! That left Ford on the shallow end of the power pool, but engineers were secretly working on a flash update for its in-house oil burner. The engineering tweak is now available and brings the Power Stroke's figures up to 400 horsepower and 800 lb-ft of torque, besting the General's mill by three ponies and 35 pound-feet.

Power Stroke badgeOur friend Mike Levine over at Pickuptrucks.com dyno'd the engine before and after the reflash. The new Power Stroke has a lot more low-end torque than it did before the reflash, with an extra 45 lb-ft available at the rear wheels at a measly 2,000 rpm. But as the power band stretches towards 4,000 revolutions, the torque totals swing back into the favor of the pre-calibration engine by 22.1 lb-ft. Is that a big deal? Probably not to truck drivers, as low-end torque is the name of the game when you're pulling and hauling for a living.

Beyond added capability, Levine tells us that the reflashed Super Duty feels less jumpy, adding "gear shifts were smoother and less noticeable after the update than before getting on the freeway and driving on surface streets." New 2011 models heading down the assembly line will receive the updated mill, but existing customers can get a free reflash from their dealer. For the next 12 months, some early purchasers of the 2011 Power Stroke will also have to visit a dealer for the upgrade. The whole process reportedly takes all of 30 minutes, or enough time to think about what else you can tow with your newfound torque. Head over to pickuptrucks.com to read the extensive review of the new engine calibrations.



[Source: Pickuptrucks]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 28 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      So is this like when I flash my computer BIOS?

      /runs
        • 4 Years Ago
        Well, it's not like when you flash your co-workers, though they do get rather torque'd. ;-)
      • 4 Years Ago
      Who would rev this engine above 3400rpm? (under power, not overrun braking)
      • 4 Years Ago
      @SEALBoy:

      It's probably more like overclocking you CPU and video card.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Finally! Now I can tow my mother-in-law.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Still a few shy of a Veyron's 922 torques but getting closer....
      • 4 Years Ago
      Yay! I can't wait to get one of these and drive to my office job and do no hauling or off-roading whatsoever! I'll look so cool!

      /Pretty cool for those that would actually USE it though.
      //Need to pull a tree stump from my front yard.
      ///Someone with one of these wanna help?
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Jake
        Exactly! Unless the vehicle is being used for it's intended purpose, it's just compensation for....other inadequacies.

        /I weep for all the 911 Turbos that have never seen a track day.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I can only imagine how amazing it must be for current owners next time they have their truck serviced. "Oh, by the way, we can reflash your ecu to give you an extra 10 hp and 35 lb-ft. Would you like that?"

      More companies should do this. It's like getting a surprise present from your dealership.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Except heres what stealers really say:
        "Oh so we had to replace a bolt. That will be $45 plus $300 in labor."
        Actual cost of bolt: $0.50
        Actual time to replace bolt: 10 minutes, including looking it up on the parts database.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Because you really need 800lb/ft of torque to tow your jet ski that can fit in the truck bed.

      /
      • 4 Years Ago
      wow! more torque than you'll ever need. or at least more torque than the people that have no need for such a towing/hauling vehicle will ever actually find need for, except maybe ikea (fiberboard gets heavy when you stack enough of it).
      this is getting silly, so now is GM going to reflash and come up with 805 lbft?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Giant wheels with low profile tires on a heavy duty work truck are for posers and
      suburban soccer dads.
      • 4 Years Ago
      What's with car companies? Ford's 6.6L engine is called "6.7". Mercedes' 6.2L engine is called "63". LIARS!
        • 4 Years Ago
        The Mercedes is a lie. The "6.3L" is actually a 6208cc engine...making it close to a perfect 6.2L.

        The Ford? Not so much. Every company likes to round up numbers so Ford is technically right. The reason? It's a 6651cc engine. If it had been 6649, then it most likely would have been called a 6.6L.

        It's like the whole thing about Ford's old 5.0 (which was technically a 4.9L) and the new 5.0. The old 5.0 was a 4942cc. while the new one is 4951cc.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's "Tradition", at least that's what MB claims. Never understood this thinking either. It'd make a little sense if they had a 3.9L and just called it a 4L (I know I've seen a car/truck out there that has done this, can't remember what it was though) but .3? .7? No idea.
      • 4 Years Ago
      You know, the grill is just a bit too subdued. Come on Ford, how about something a bit meatier

      /
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