• Sep 9, 2010
What a theft-proof car requires – Click above to view the image after the jump

According to HomeSecurity.net, one million vehicles (worth a total of $7.5 billion) were stolen in the United States last year. If you don't want to join a top ten list of vehicles dominated by Honda and Toyota, there are seven key technologies you'd install to create "The Ultimate Theft-Proof Car." No, one of them isn't The Club.

Leading the way is a radio-frequency transmitter, which is alone responsible for 90 percent of theft recoveries. Following that are a secure identification device like a fingerprint reader, some sort of GPS tracking system, SIM-card operated GSM communications that allow the car to call its owner when broken into, an interior motion detector, keyless entry and a passive immobilizer. Or you could just get an Abrams M1 tank – we hear they're pretty hard to lift. Follow the jump for the complete infographic.

[Source: HomeSecurity.net]

The Ultimate Theft Proof Car.

Research by Home Security.net



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      There's already a theft-proof car...

      It's called the Honda Crosstour.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No, that's sex-proof.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Lmao best Infographic ever! Unstealable because Audi won't sell it here, harharhar
      • 4 Years Ago
      Did we all forget about this video

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AcVSEY2DP0
      • 4 Years Ago
      Late to the party, but here is the ultimate car for theft prevention.

      The Chameleon XLE

      http://hotrodmopeds.com/?p=242
      • 4 Years Ago
      I've always dreamt of a security system that completely ignore's human rights. Electrocution, flame throwers, force fields, heat/movement trigger turret guns, the works. If only.
      • 4 Years Ago
      At least 3 of the technologies are "recovery" tools, not theft prevention. If my car gets stolen, I don't want it found. Recovered cars can be smashed, abused or otherwise devalued, which insurance will never pay for.
      • 4 Years Ago
      That;s is an Audi S5 Sportback.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yes, with a key fob from a B6 (2002-2005) A4/S4, but that's beyond the point, isn't it?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I have the ultimate in anti theft. A 12-71 blower that's hard to see around. "Doors" that don't open. A rollcage that cuts visibility. The starter switch is under the seat. The battery can only turn the engine 7 times. Those two 1000CFM carbs take "the love touch". The headers have 2.5"primaries and 4" dumps right behind the front wheels, so it's louder than your average '95 chevy p/u. 632 cubic inches won't go too far on 20 gallons of gas. The white base color, coupled with Lime green and electric blue flames/lightning bolts might not be subtle enough though.
      • 4 Years Ago
      1. Build a Faraday cage large enough to enclose the car. 2. Hook to tow truck....3. Gone.

        • 4 Years Ago
        Or you could just pull a useful fuse like the fuel pump when you leave the car
        • 4 Years Ago
        The day I can track my dog, cat and car with my iPhone (and get the cat to attack as I've taught her) car thievery is done for...

        Seriously, we're nearing the age of such ubiquitous networks, car theft will no longer be viable.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This info-graph is more about electronic immobilization rather than physical. The ultimate "theft-proof car" would be the best of both worlds. I mean electronics aren't fail proof, I'm pretty sure that there are jammers/scramblers that can interfere with the radio frequencies, and GPS doesn't work where it can't receive a signal, the same applies for the cellular communication. Thieves are getting "smarter" and are able to crack codes or other encryption keys and gain entry to the vehicle and start it up and get out in a jiffy.
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Or you could just get an Abrams M1 tank – we hear they're pretty hard to lift."

      Not only that, they're surprisingly fast. The one disappointing thing about an Abrams, though, is that you'd never get the chance to flatten a car loitering in the hammer lane. Every single last one of them will get out of your way.

      On second thought...
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