• Sep 9, 2010
The government of Canada has finalized regulations that will require an average renewable fuel content of five percent in gasoline – two percent in diesel fuel and heating oil – starting December 15th, 2010. The regulations are but one minor step in Canada's far-reaching Renewable Fuels Strategy. Once fully implemented, Canada's renewable fuel content requirements will, as the government states, "reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to four megatonnes in 2012 – about the equivalent of taking one million vehicles off the road."

The new regulations will help Canada attain its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020. Jim Prentice, Canada's Minister of the Environment, outlined the importance of the renewable fuel content regulations, stating:
Regulating renewable fuel content in gasoline is just one of several steps the Government is taking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector, which account for about a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions.
But, as Gerry Ritz, Canada's Minister of Agriculture, points out (and we tend to agree with):
Support for renewable fuels is support for farmers, rural communities and our economy. This is a vital step in generating new market opportunities for our farmers and maximizing Canada's high quality resources to produce food and fuel for the world.
Creating jobs, funding farmers and saving the environment all courtesy of a single regulation. Now, that's what we call productive legislation. Hit the jump for more on Canada's renewable fuel regulations or you click here to read the entire policy in excruciating detail.

[Source: Environment Canada]

PRESS RELEASE

Government of Canada Releases Final Regulations for Renewable Fuel Content in Gasoline


OTTAWA, Ont. -- September 1, 2010 -- The Government of Canada today announced that regulations requiring an average renewable fuel content of five per cent in gasoline have been finalized and will come into effect starting December 15, 2010.

"Today we are fulfilling the Government's commitment to require five percent renewable fuel content in gasoline," said the Honourable Jim Prentice, Minister of the Environment. "Regulating renewable fuel content in gasoline is just one of several steps the Government is taking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector, which account for about a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions."

"Support for renewable fuels is support for farmers, rural communities and our economy," said Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. "This is a vital step in generating new market opportunities for our farmers and maximizing Canada's high quality resources to produce food and fuel for the world."

"These regulations will help Canada reach our goal of becoming a clean energy leader," said Christian Paradis, Minister of Natural Resources. "Our Government supports biofuels and other alternative fuels as part of our commitment to reducing Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions by 17 percent, from 2005 levels, by 2020."

These regulations are one pillar of the Government's broader Renewable Fuels Strategy. Canada will implement a requirement for two per cent renewable content in diesel fuel and heating oil, subject to successful demonstration of technical feasibility under the range of Canadian conditions, which would be put in place by an amendment to the Renewable Fuels Regulations.

When fully implemented, the Strategy's two regulatory requirements combined with provincial regulations will ensure a total volume of renewable fuel that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to four megatonnes in 2012--about the equivalent of taking one million vehicles off the road.

These regulations are a key initiative in support of the Government of Canada's commitment to reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions by 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020. In addition, the Government of Canada is working with the U.S. towards common North American standards for regulating greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles, and has recently published, draft regulations for vehicle tailpipe emissions under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act that are aligned with those of the U.S. Building on that successful collaboration, we will continue to work together to do the same for heavy-duty vehicles.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      No surprise there. Our Canadian government has no brains at all. Ethanol creates more pollution is almost no benefit (requires a lot of gas just to make and other energy inputs). Costs more to produce than the gas it replaces. Just an expensive scheme to make gas companies look more green.

      Evan, farming in Ontario needs a big shot in the arm. Unfortunately this won't happen until after "peak oil" when importing food becomes so expensive that people start buying local produce. Get ready for a massive gas price rise starting in the 2016 - 2020 period.

      Ontario would be smart to prepare for this by building LFTRs.

      Liquid Flouride Thorium Reactors were invented in the 1960s at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. They ran one for almost 5 years. LFTRs use cheap thorium, are inherently safe, do not produce long term radio-active waste and were abandoned because they are not suitable for making bombs. See:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWUeBSoEnRk
      and
      http://energyfromthorium.com/
      Although the principles are proven, there is still some research required for the best materials to have long 50 year plus life. This should be our highest priority to solve our energy and pollution problems.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The most comprehensive survey of energy in vs. energy out for ethanol, which examined the entire body of peer-reviewed literature on the subject and was published in "Science" in 2006, has proven that for each gallon of gasoline used to make it, at least 10 and even 20 gallons of ethanol are yielded.

        And ethanol might be more expensive than gasoline on a per-mile or per-month basis (it almost always costs less per-gallon), but it's still reasonably close. Its sister alcohol fuel, methanol, is much cheaper, even on a per-mile basis, and the low cost is scalable since methanol can be made from a vast array of sources, including natural gas, coal or any biomass at all.

        Finally, since almost no oil-fired electric power plants exist anymore, nuclear plants are not a way to get off oil. What matters is changing vehicle fuels.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The US Department of Agricultural study claims 15.7% gas input and a total net energy value of 1.34. It is 1.1 just for the ethanol, but since there are other saleable by-products, this brings it up to 1.34. So, yes, ethanol is not as bad as I claimed, and is getting better.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Anotner example of government being years too late and dollars too short.

      In America, the Ethanol makers are pushing to raise the Ethanol content from E-10 to E-15 as a octane riser, mileage and oxydiser, for pollution control. Lots of ethanol also goes into E-85 as well.

      So the synthetically manufactured hydrocarbon fuels, displacing gasoline, are already easily approaching 15% of supply here in the US, and they are trying to assure markets for their product. I assume the same applies in Canada as well.

      • 4 Years Ago
      5% is barely enough to qualify as an oxygenate in the US. We could increase the % of Ethanol in the US until it tops out but the Anti-Ethanol crowd is vocally opposed to anything and everything.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Some Canada's best farmland that is capable of growing fruits and vegetables is wasted growing corn for livestock feed, especially in southern Ontario. It's reached the point where the majority of fruits and vegetables in Canadian grocery stores is imported! The last thing Canada needs is to convert even more farms from producing human food, to producing corn for ethanol.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ethanol corn is no threat to the food supply. Even while its production has gone up several fold in the last decade, "food corn" production is up too, as is production of other staples such as soybeans. "Food vs. fuel" is an oil cartel lie. We pay farmers not to farm because they already over-produce such a cornucopia that food sits in government warehouses or is dumped on food aid programs or the world market, and making even more would collapse prices so much family farmers would be wiped out. Efficiency and per acre crop yields rise so relentlessly that fewer farmers and less land is needed each year to feed a growing population - that's why less than half our farmland is even cultivated and young adults are streaming out of rural areas looking for work.

        There's huge slack capacity in the world ag sector that can be used for biofuel without at all reducing the food supply