• Aug 24, 2010
Translogic Episode 5.4 – Click above to watch video after the jump

Our brothers from another mother over at Translogic just released their latest episode yesterday, episode 5.4 for whoever's counting. Host Bradley Hasemeyer spent a day with General Motors at the automaker's Milford Proving Ground driving the 2011 Chevrolet Volt and came away with some heretofore unknown tidbits of information about the series hybrid.

For one, in addition to Eco, Normal and Sport modes, the Volt will have what's called Mountain Mode that allows it to climb any grade in the country. A GM engineer says they checked to be sure its Mountain Mode was adequate for any grade in the States and we have proof of at least one major mountain the Volt can climb. When Mountain Mode is selected, ideally about ten miles out from any big hills you want to climb, the Volt will kick on its on-board generator and create extra energy for the batteries. This allows the Volt's drive system to draw more power than normal from the battery packs while climbing a grade. If the battery packs are drained and the generator's already on, Mountain Mode will then increase the engine's RPM to make up the difference.

Bradley also performed an impromptu 0-60 miles per hour test in the Volt, completing the run to highway speeds in 8.53 seconds while the car was in Sport mode. Not earth shatteringly quick, but plenty spry to feel normal in everyday driving conditions. Over the course of the day, Bradley drove the Volt a total of 59.7 miles, 16.1 of which occurred with the gas-powered range-extending on. During that time, 0.59 gallons of gas were consumed, which means the Volt achieved about 100 mpg for the day and 27.3 mpg while the engine was operating.

The rest of the video is full of Volt information of which we're already aware, including how it interacts with mobile devices, charging options and the like, though we can't say we've seen anybody throw around the Volt yet like Bradley did. Follow the jump to view episode 5.4 for yourself and visit the Translogic blog here.

[Source: Translogic]



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 75 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      that Valerie chick is a little hottie
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's a cute toy that GM has unrolled. I agree with people who say this car will be meant for those who live in the southern states such as Florida and California, who don't have to drive very far and don't have winters. But even in California it would have problems I can see a bunch of these things Dead in Los Angeles clogging the freeways because their owners forgot to plug it in at home or the office or on campus, and then they hit that marvelous L.A. Traffic and then about five miles up the road there is an accident and now starts the challenge of can the Volt make it in the urban setting of LA?
      And I also have a real challenge for it, in REAL WORLD not test grounds.

      The challenge I have for it is: Take the Volt up Mount Evans Road in Colorado, in your so called 'Mountain Mode' that's 14,000 feet above sea level. But to make it fair to other drivers including other Hybrids, you would have to drive it from Denver to the road. No transport vehicles.
      I highly doubt this car would make it over the first hill to Idaho Springs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I can see where they are trying to go with this car, but I don't see how the price will save me any more money than just keeping my current high mpg non hybrid car thats been paid off for like 10 years. Plus repair costs are cheaper than this car I'm sure.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @turbomonkey

        I wouldn't doubt it considering they are all in bed together.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Keeping virtually any car that has been paid for for 10 years is going to be cheaper than buying any new car.
        Virtually any mechanical repair on a car that has been paid off for 10 years is going to be cheaper than buying any new car.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The technology is young. This is a stepping stone.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Matt(that likes ford)

        I understand that. And there are cars that aren't aimed toward you. However you still comment on them here, whether it be Buick, Honda, McLaren, or well...Ford. I'm saying for the people who already have paid off vehicles for awhile and saving money, how could this car that runs on electricity(thats great), save them more money by costing between thirty and forty THOUSAND!!!! dollars?

        Also, if people on here only commented on cars that were aimed at them there would be one or two comments per supercar post, if even that. So get over youself.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Man alive, we got a lot of people begging for downvotes today!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Looking at a car like this to "save money" is like looking at a sports car to "get to work faster" -- It's a silly notion.

        Cars like this appeal to people who don't like sending trillions to Saudis and militant Islamists. Or those concerned about carbon. Or who'd rather spend the money upfront than paying exorbitant gas bills in perpetuity. Or tech enthusiasts...
        • 4 Years Ago
        Rumor has it that GM has connections to folks that can get gasoline taxes raised to a level that will make this car a lot more appealing.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's worth noting that this was a paid advertisement for the Volt, not an independent test. My biggest concern is how this rushed to market car is going to be working 2 or 3 years after purchase. They can offer a 50 year bumper to bumper warranty, you won't really care that it's not "costing" you anything to fix if it's in the shop once a month. I've been there with Chevy before.
      • 4 Years Ago
      What a thorough, critical review that was "Brought to you by Chevrolet" and Sponsored By: Chevrolet Volt

      We used to call these infomercials.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This car, the Leaf and "green" electric vehicles only make sense for a tiny fraction of our population in Sun states. Like Los Angeles or Miami. They won't work well or at all for people in the Twin Cities. They are manufacturer statements for the companies that produce them and political/environmental statements for those who buy them.
        • 4 Years Ago
        V12:
        Actually the state is it'll work for people 90+% of the time.

        So that means that it''ll work for people 330 days a year, the other month, you're on your own. This is not a very good solution for many people.

        And your idea that the Volt is still addicted to gas is bizarre. If you only drive 40 miles at a time, the Volt doesn't use gas. And any solar panels you put on your roof can charge a Volt as easily as a Leaf. It's just the Volt has an even shorter all-electric range than the Leaf.

        There's not actually any guarantee a Leaf uses any less gas than a Volt. If you have to drive a distance that is too far for a Leaf and you take your other car (gas car) because if it, you can easily use more gas than a Volt would. Like say you want to go 100 miles today. Let's say you have a Volt and it gets 30mpg on gas plus 40 miles on electricity. You'll use 2 gallons of gas. If you have a Leaf, you can't take it, so you take your other car that gets 30mpg instead. You'll use 3 and 1/3rd gallons of gas.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Statistically and according to the US Census department you are not really correct. A Nissan LEAF (sorry Volt, your STILL addicted to gas so you're being excluded from this comment) would appeal to 90+ percent of the US population that drives less than 40 miles a day, however 96 percent drive less than 100 miles a day - So for most American's ( or most drivers on the planet), these EV's are much more appealing that any current study or message board may otherwise suggest. In States where there is a lot of sun, a simple Solar system will charge a LEAF, and that's a great thing if you can make it happen. We're on the cusp of some great changes, but with Nissan planning 6-10 EV's (vans, small trucks, wagons, commercial) within a few years and everyone else jumping on board behind them - any home in the future without a charging station will seam behind the times.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You're a fool, aping misinformation. A drive train like this can work for virtually everyone in mild or temperate climates and will still operate fine in colder climates. Most drivers drive far less than 40 miles round trip to work and the gas extends that range indefinitely (yes, even in Minnesota). At about $35k, it's not out of reach for most car buyers either (the median is about $32k now) and gasoline savings takes the edge off those few extra grand.
      • 4 Years Ago
      For a compact hybrid sedan (that is more electric than gasoline), those are some really impressive numbers! Nice work GM!
      • 4 Years Ago
      From the comments here, it sounds like some of you would've stoned
      the Wright Brothers.
      • 4 Years Ago
      So many whiners here.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Well the system was also charging the battery in Mountain mode.

      So the millage was actually around 60MPG if you factor the energy it was storing in the battery for later.

      • 4 Years Ago
      First legit electric car I have seen. Note to all; the Volt isn't about saving money. It's more about having the first, practical electric car that can do everything a normal car can.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Very true. At this point it's just early adopters wanting to be the first to own a vehicle like this. A practical case for mainstream adoption is a ways off. I there would have to be some serious break throughs in battery technology before this sort of car is ready for prime time.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Assume 1/3 gallon of gasoline at $3/per gallon for $1 plus, as GM says, an average of $1.50 for 12.5 kWh electricity from the grid for 43 miles in EV mode results in a $2.30 cost for almost 60 miles of travel.

      Certainly better than any other Det3 domestic vehicle I can think of!

      It would be interesting to see how that would compare to Ford's 2010 1.6 Duratorq TDCi (109PS) 5 Door Saloon (ECO Start-Stop) Focus VCA rated at 74.3/83.1 mpg(Imperial) combined/extra urban or about 62/69 mpg(US) combined/highway.
      http://www.vcacarfueldata.org.uk/search/vehicleDetails.asp?id=25545
    • Load More Comments