• Aug 23rd 2010 at 9:00AM
  • 71
We finally get our chance behind the wheel of the much anticipated Chevrolet Volt. Bradley hits the test track at GM's top secret proving grounds to see what Chevy's new electric ride is made of.

  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM
  • Image Credit: GM

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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 71 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      I am all for this type of vehicle. I am also a Chevy man. Most importantly; I am a technical trouble-shooter. I thrive on scrutinizing a piece of machinery and correcting it's flaws. No matter how fine it is; improvements can be made. I'm never satisfied with good. "Good, Better, Best; Never let it rest; 'Till your Good is Better; And your Better is Best." Then we start again. The world changes daily. We have to keep-up. We have to work harder to get ahead. We have to understand more than our product. Our pride comes only from need. Our product must support the consumer needs; or it won't support ours. If we give them our best; they will support us. If we change as their needs change; they will be there. If the product changes with the flow of the consumers needs; it will grow. Engineers can create great things. They can only be refined by the needs of the consumer. There must be an interface to connect them. That would be me. I've done it for years in the name of a job; just to feed my family. I won't continue to give my services to others at my expense. Read this over and over. I'ts your dime. I'm cheap. Just trying to survive. I can make your difference. Contact me. I'm allways here.
      John@jc777donedeal@aol.com
      horseflicks
      • 5 Years Ago
      It's still a Chevy, designed and manufactured by the same folks who have made junk for the past 35 years.

      The resale, particularly with expensive batteries that need replacing will plummet. You heard it here first.
      OH NOBLE ONE!!!
      • 5 Years Ago
      I have to test drive one of these.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @OH NOBLE ONE!!!
        If you get into a accident what happens if a the battery ruptures?

        How are the batteries recycled?
        sscj7
        • 4 Years Ago
        @OH NOBLE ONE!!!
        Nomater what the negs are . i see this as lets get this on . we need to move on this .
      apairalypsenow2
      • 5 Years Ago
      How come they never mention how much it costs per month?/per year? to charge one of these, worst case scenario??
      And how does it save the environment from emissions related polluting, when its causing the fossil fuel driven coal generating station to amp up production of megawatts in order to charge these millions of beasts, literally and exponentially increasing the fossil fuel pollution output 1000%!!! Its a double edged albatross waiting for redemption!
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        They say it all the time, it's less than 1 dollar 40 cents a day using the average utility rates around the country for the 40 mile charge. Compare that to a 30 mpg car and it's about a buck a gallon. And the argument about it polluting more than a typical car is way off, 50 percent of the country is coal, the others are renewables, hydro, or nuclear with no carbon emmissions. Cars like these will seriously reduce pollution. And the battery is warranted for 8 years 100,000 miles but it will last well over 10.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        The car uses 8kWh to go about 40 miles. The battery holds 16kWh but is only charged and discharged partway to maximize its life. The price of 8kWh depends on your local utility but will be around $1.30 per charge, or less with timed charging to get discount rates.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        The University of California, Davis calculated that, generally, plug-in cars that are charged using electricity from the local grid will emit notably less CO2 overall than the use of cars powered from on-board, oil-based fuel, if a significant proportion of that electricity is generated from nuclear power and renewable sources such as hydro-electric (45% in California, for example). (ref in Wikipedia Chevrolet Volt article).
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        you also have to consider that most of the cars will be recharged at nighttime when the power grid is not needed as much, but the coal power plant is still producing an abundant amount of electricity,you cant really shut them down every night. therefore the car is making use of wasted electricity thus improving a coal power plants efficiency rather than making it worse.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        It's been mentioned all over. Per month: $350. To charge: 80¢ per day.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        In California, many people (including myself) have installed solar panels on our homes. I installed a system that produces 120% of what I use so I'll have the capacity to fuel electric vehicles. I plan to buy or lease one now and my wife will add a second car in a couple of years. Pacific Gas and Electric Co. is also offering special rates to charge electric vehicles between midnight and 6 a.m. because the system has unused capacity during those hours. In the sunbelt states electric cars will probably be very popular; fossil fuel burning to generate electricity will be more of a problem on the East Coast.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        The batteries at $9000.00 a pop need to be replaced every 2 years.
        capenv
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        Don't be an idiot. You can't have it both ways.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        WTF is a "double edged albatross!?"
        • 5 Years Ago
        @apairalypsenow2
        So assuming 8 kWh provides 40 miles; the average coal fired power plant in the US produces 2 lbs of CO2 per kWh (newer plants are significantly better). This means the Volt would cause 16 lbs of CO2 per 40 miles or 0.4 lbs CO2/mile.

        An internal combustion engine turns a gallon of gasoline into 19.56 lbs of CO2. To be equal to the Volt in CO2 emmissions (0.4 lbs CO2/mile) the vehicle would have to get 48.8 miles/gallon.

        Keep in mind this is rather conservative given that we are assuming all power is produced by coal (without renewables or nuclear, which have near zero carbon emmissions) and that coal emmissions aren't improving (which they are).
      Sekinu2
      • 5 Years Ago
      The idea at one time was good but the car itsself is a late technology that is already dying as it is not cost effective or realistic for any amount of drivers. Figfure these would attract short distance drives ie city dwellers with its charge and smaller size but it doest work how do you charge your car from the 8th floor 20th floor street parking offers no free outlets and no for seen metered parking is in sight for street parkers. Those figures at $350 a month would stop me alone as I spend $200 a month on my v8 driving over 100 miles aday which mean I save $150 a month not driving this car and the price cost twice what my car new is. Ford is on the right track with the research and development of hydrogen powered cars as they are faster, travel further less exspensive and fuel is almost free as hydrogen can be made at home out of rain water or tap water with a by product of just excess water. Its a fun idea but everything about the volt just doesnt match up to real everyday needs or usage.
      paulcamaro5
      • 5 Years Ago
      So let me get this straight.I have to travel 1100 miles to help take care of my sick parents in Florida.I break the trip up into two days 550 miles a day. I make it in two days.With the volt clown car I can travel 40 miles a day after an 8 hour charge.So it would take me 40 days to get to Florida to take care of my parents.They could be dead by the time I got there.What a farce !
        • 5 Years Ago
        @paulcamaro5
        That's only true if you relied solely on the electric charge. The Volt has a gasoline engine which kicks in to generate electricity when the initial battery charge is spent.
      • 5 Years Ago
      1- When the car is charged, you are have no transportation for 10 hours
      2- What would happen if you on the road and the car needs to be charged?
      3- where the charging station get the electricity? aren't we going to same problems of energy source?
      LET'S US KEEP HOPE FOR BETER THINGS, i.e. ONE HOUR CHARGE AND LONG LASTING BATTERY.
        • 5 Years Ago
        The gasoline generator (NOT engine) recharges the battery as you drive (after the battery runs down after 40 or so miles .. say, on a highway trip). That gasoline will take you about an additional 300 or so miles without stopping. Stop at a gas station and get more gas, no need to plug in, your battery has plenty of juice left.
      • 5 Years Ago
      垃圾车 垃圾人啊!美国的菜鸟
      • 5 Years Ago
      A good test ride video but wish you had been able to share information about the Volt's fuel tank size and the MPGs the Volt gets when the generator is running. With the present low cost of gasoline the reported 41K purchase price for a Volt is hard to justify for many families. Hoping the Generation-2 Volt has some significant improvements in all areas.
        • 5 Years Ago
        GM would not give that info out. EPA has yet to give it an mpg estimate.
      trshaf6
      • 5 Years Ago
      It has a gas powered engine that kicks in when recharge is needed,which makes it a glorified hybrid car.If it was truely electric,It would,nt have a gas engine.
        Ron BOSS
        • 5 Years Ago
        @trshaf6
        Right and after 40 miles you call a tow truck, which gets 8 mpg, good thinking.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @trshaf6
        It's 100% electrically driven. The gasoline engine is used as a generator--it doesn't propel the vehicle.
        savelandr
        • 5 Years Ago
        @trshaf6
        FYI, but if it didn't have a gas engine, you couldn't take it on a trip. The idea was an electric car in most cases, but the ability to use it like a real car when needed.

        I don't know if you were making a technical distinction, or opining that it would be a better car with the gas engine removed?
      EASY59RIDER
      • 5 Years Ago
      I am excited about the technoglagy that GM has put into this car-- Truly the wave of the future for cutting down on air pollution. I AM IMPRESSED WITH WHAT GM AND AMERICA IS DOING. Makes me very proud. AMERICA AND GM ARE THE GREATEST. I AM PROUD OF BOTH THE US AND GM. GREAT JOB-DONE. LISTEN UP REST OF THE WORLD--AMERICA AND GM ARE CHARTING THE FUTURE OF GREEN TRANPORTATION AND I AM PROUD OF BOTH.
      GMer
      • 5 Years Ago
      GM are shipping it with an 8-year 100,000 mile battery warranty. They expect a 10-year life for the battery. If GM had faith in it's battery they would warrant it for 10 years and 100,000 miles. The cost of the replacement battery is approximately $10,000. I'd wait a couple years before I would buy any new technology.

      The Chevy Volt may work well as a hand built fleet. When Chevy actually starts to mass producing them, GOOD LUCK!! By the way what country are the major parts of the Chevy Volt made in. Is the Chevy Volt a re-badged Daewoo from Korea?
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