• Aug 2, 2010
The ever-conscious safety fanatics at Volvo have realized it's unwittingly made a mistake on their 2007-2010 S80 sedans. It seems that the maximum permissible tire pressure information was printed incorrectly in the owner's manuals and on the sticker pasted to the vehicles' door jams. Worse, that same incorrect inflation data is hard-coded into the cars' tire-pressure monitoring systems.

Volvo claims that it has never received any complaints on the issue and that it found the problem on its own. Naturally, though, the Swedish automaker is keenly interested in getting the problem rectified and will replace the incorrect manuals and stickers, and update the S80's software to correct the tire-pressure monitoring system.

We've posted the recall information from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration after the break. Owners are urged to call Volvo at 1-800-458-1552 or email customercare -at- volvoforlife.com for further information.

[Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration via Kicking Tires]

Vehicle Make / Model: Model Year(s):
VOLVO / S80 2007-2010

VOLVO IS RECALLING CERTAIN MODEL YEAR 2007-2010 S80 VEHICLES FOR FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD NO. 110, "TIRE SELECTION AND RIMS." THE TIRE AND LOADING INFORMATION LABEL AND A PAGE IN THE OWNER'S MANUAL CONTAIN INCORRECT MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE INFLATION PRESSURE AND THE TIRE PRESSURE MONITORING SYSTEM (TPMS) SOFTWARE HAS AN INCORRECT TRIGGER LEVEL.
THESE VEHICLES DOES NOT MEET THE REQUIRED SAFETY STANDARDS.
DEALERS WILL UPDATE THE VEHICLES WITH A NEW TIRE AND LOADING INFORMATION LABEL, OWNER'S MANUAL LABEL AND TPMS SOFTWARE. THIS SERVICE WILL BE PERFORMED FREE OF CHARGE. THE MANUFACTURER HAS NOT YET PROVIDED AN OWNER NOTIFICATION SCHEDULE. OWNERS MAY CONTACT VOLVO AT 1-800-458-1552 OR CUSTOMERCARE@VOLVOFORLIFE.COM .
VOLVO SAFETY RECALL NO. R228. OWNERS MAY ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION'S VEHICLE SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), OR GO TO HTTP://WWW.SAFERCAR.GOV .


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  • 21 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      At least it would add some excitement to driving a Volvo.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'd like to fire everyone who voted to mandate the TPMS. Absolutely a waste of money, and an unnecessary weight addition to vehicles.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Thank you for saying this, totally agree.

        People are going to be FURIOUS when the batteries on the sensor start to fail. They were designed to last ~7 years and when done the entire TPMS sensor will need to be replaced at $100+ EACH. Add tire mounting/balancing, that will be $500+.

        Leave it to congress (and a Republican one at that, writing corporate welfare checks) to not mandate a standard TPMS system so third parties can produce sensors CHEAP, car manufacturers have us locked in to buying the proprietary sensors, with HUGE markup.

        I had to go through this all early, buying winter tires for my car, and it was a huge pain. But in a few years (they were mandated in 2007) people will start complaining in mass.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Give us some REAL numbers then, my 2010 Ram is around $40.75 PER tire for the sensors, and yes it has the system that shows individual tire pressure.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Heh, I just had to take my GTI in because the TPMS was calibrated for something absurd like 80 psi, probably through a faulty metric conversion. I wonder if Volvo's system is made by the same supplier as VW's.
      • 4 Years Ago
      this is why I read the information on the tire itself when filling.
      robert fields
      • 4 Years Ago
      i own a freakin volvo--why is such a well thought of car been turned into a pile of dung!--they once were the best,before ford took over ,and now owned by china!---enough--fix your damn cars and and get the mess right before you sell them---the biggest dung pile on the road is the xc90---what a recall nightmare---volvo is not what it once was and i will never buy one again------enough said--volvo sux
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good lord is it that hard to use a $1 tire gauge?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I thought something was up. Test drove three of these before we purchased an '07. All of them had the warning lit up. Sales people said that the sensor was very finicky on the S80 - I guess this is why. Great car all around.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Since the Chinese just bought Volvo, let them fix this problem. Right?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I like the BMW system that just compares rotational difference between the wheels. If they all deflate steadily nothing ever alerts, but you can change wheels and it still works. If you get a rapid deflation you will know about it, which is what matters.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Many cars used to have that system too, but it's an older one. It was simpler since the ECU could just sample the ABS wheel speed sensor data. Nowadays a lot of cars use TPMS sensors to get an exact PSI reading. Usually you can tell by noting whether the valve stems are metal (TPMS) or regular rubber (no TPMS/regular).

        This way, you are still alerted to tires that perhaps haven't been tended to in a while, and so might be low on air. It is easier to change to different wheels, though , indeed.
      • 4 Years Ago
      If it was below the sidewall max pressure (I'm guessing 55 PSI), there isn't really anything to worry about. Well, perhaps, since the way other things like traction or stability control are programmed might be with the expectation of a certain tire pressure. But IMO most people overestimate the impact of an "over"inflated tire. There's nothing wrong as long as you stay at or under the max sidewall pressure.

      Underinflated tires are far more dangerous and overinflated tires. I go OEM+3 usually with my tires. On my last set I went OEM+8 with no ill effects (more MPG).
        • 4 Years Ago
        It depends, nate. Some cars will experience treadwear issues at the extreme end of that range, but for example, if you go up say, 5-10 PSI, you'll probably be fine.

        Reduced patch can be an issue, again, depending on how much you inflate. Some people are ok with it, some prefer a bit more patch. As for me, I eventually went down a bit so I get more grip in the wet.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "There's nothing wrong as long as you stay at or under the max sidewall pressure... On my last set I went OEM+8 with no ill effects (more MPG)."

        There's nothing wrong, except perhaps reduced contact patch, reduced traction, accelerated wear at the center of the tread ... no big deal, right?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah, I always inflate over OEM, my Honda recommends 32psi, and I run 38-40 depending on the season. The ride is a little harder, but I'll take the lower roll resistence and better MPGs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This story is so breathlessly worded to tout Volvo's reputation for safety, it's hard to read into the fact that most auto companies pre-recall problems like Volvo's done here. Toyota, GM, Honda, BMW and the rest do exactly the same things now. But the pandering in this article is pretty sickening.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Too many stories about GODDAMNED cars today. Stop it!!! I command it, Mr. BoyEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE !!!
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