• Aug 1, 2010
A new report from the The Wall Street Journal claims that the Department of Transportation is blocking the release of National Highway Transportation Safety Administration findings on the Toyota unintended acceleration issues. According to the article, NHTSA has compiled all the relevant information and written a report on its findings, but George Pearson, the former head of the agency's recall division, says that he was told that the Transportation Department doesn't want the information released. Why? Pearson didn't say, but the Journal seems to think that the information could add fuel to the argument that NHTSA is too close to automakers.
Meanwhile, the Transportation Department says that the report is incomplete, and that it will take more time to properly review all of the data associated with the issue. Pearson, on the other hand, claims that the report shows that in the majority of unintended acceleration cases, the vehicle's black boxes clearly indicated that the accelerator was depressed and the brake pedal was not. That means that the cases could be chalked up to driver error – something that would serve to vindicate Toyota. Thanks for the tip, MKIV!

[Source: The Wall Street Journal]


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  • 49 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is just another payoff to the UAW!
      • 4 Years Ago
      I just read the report from Wall Street Journal - that is easy to understand ... it is crystal clear that some rogues in Congress, NHTSA and nodoubt other parties such as Lawyers were hoping to find a glitch in Toyota's that they could against the brand and in the early days of the debacle even publically critised Toyota without due care or substantial information to support thier rogue claims.

      In the light of investigations not just by Toyota but also NHTSA, NASA and some other parties - nothing has been identified beyond Toyotas original claims so this is not looking good for the idiotic big mouths whom tried to slam Toyota about electronic glitches and will only serve to discredit those involved not to mention many cases against Toyota for UA will probably loose traction.

      Just goes to show and make it be a warning - unless you have correct and supportive evidance .... forget about trying to be a loose cannon because it could just aswell come about to bite 'ya back as it is looking like will happen to some of the stupid twits in Congress.

      Infact, i hope it even allows traction for Toyota to sue in return for attempting to scare munger the public against Toyota with comments such as all Toyota's should stop be driven. What an absolute load of utter, impeccably stupid crap that statement was.

      Inlight of what has happened over he past few months - Toyota will loose some ground for a period of time but the brand WILL BOUNCE BACK better and stronger then it ever has been ... mark my words and make no mistake of it !!
      • 4 Years Ago
      It is believed, that the little black box black boxes in question, had crosslinked inputs. so that the defect causing the the runaway / unintended acceleration. also gave the erroneous code that showed the accelerator was pushed. when the brake was pushed. What or who can you believe.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It doesn't matter if the inputs were crossed or not, a driver experiencing unintended acceleration that is attempting to stop the vehicle would activate BOTH signals, not just one. The brake signal (what is "really" the throttle according to your theory) would be activated b/c the accelerator was stuck in the open position. The throttle signal (what is "really" the brake according to your theory) should have also been activated because the driver was applying full brakes in an attempt to stop the vehicle. If the signals were flipped as you say, then the results stated in the article would yield nothing but the driver standing on the brakes with no throttle input.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Well the witch hunt is still on.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Did Toyota turn you into a newt or something?
        • 4 Years Ago
        I have one question - if the sensor that is receiving input from the gas pedal is malfunctioning or affected by magnetic fields or cell phones or whatever, wouldn't the black box recorders simply be recording that the throttle was floored?

        All the data in the world is only as accurate as the device measuring the input.
        • 4 Years Ago
        >> Did Toyota turn you into a newt or something?

        Wow, i see no one here as ever watched Holy Grail =/
      • 4 Years Ago
      att : CoupeDeBill - Ford, GM and Cryshler have run roughshob over literally millions of owners in many markets throughout the world for many generations yet it is amazing how selective some clowns can be when critising. People like myself will never forget the downright shear and utterly pathetic incompetenace and dreadful cars that Ford, Holden (GM) and Chrysler have flogged of to our community of the years.

      On the brightside - our market finally relised and decided to purchase the array of far superior products on offer from Japan, Europe and increasingly so from South Korea which is why Ford and Holden's once combined efforts totaled 50% of the Australian market but has now dived to approx 20% ... really doesn't say much about American owned car companies does it. But then again, there really isn't much to say.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Either the NHTSA is in bed with auto manufacturers or for all the grand standing and fines, they found no more unintended accelerations than any other manufacturer when the numbers poured in and now have egg on their face.

      Either way, release the damned report
      • 4 Years Ago
      In every case where the brake pedal was never pushed but the electronic throttle pedal was floored , those vehicles were being driven by females . Just like in the case of Audi two decades ago . Because of these dummies we all have to pay extra for lock-out transmissions .
      • 4 Years Ago
      This story has left out the important facts. As the WSJ reports, NHTSA investigated 40 Toyota accidents where sudden acceleration was cited as a factor. NHTSA concluded that in 23 such accidents, the car accelerated suddenly prior to impact.

      NHTSA concluded that in *ALL* 23, the accelerator was depressed and the brakes were not depressed.

      That is not, some or many, but *ALL* - ONE HUNDRED PERCENT - were caused by driver error/pedal misapplication.

      As if we didn't know.

      I am no fan of Toyota, and think many of there cars are boring. But, it is shameful that even auto enthusiasts and Autoblog itself can't acknowledge the simple fact.

      Other than the odd floor mat entrapment or temporary pedal sticking, which Toyota has addressed, it is the same old story. People hit the gas, thinking they are hitting the brake.

      Why can't we have factual reporting?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Bull----.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Factual reporting takes time and money and produces lower ratings.
      • 4 Years Ago
      so, this "report" will refute all false evidences against Toyota and bring forth as clear as day the "lynching" attempts by GovernmentMotors into the public....

      can you REALLY blame them for not wanting to release it?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Coco - you pretty much hit the nail on the head.

      • 4 Years Ago
      Looks like the NHTSA is in lock-step with the Obama administration. Obama was touting what a great job he did in saving GM and Chrysler, last thing they need is the truth to come out about the NHTSA witch-hunt of Toyota......
      • 4 Years Ago
      If the telephone companies can be in bed with the FCC, Wall Street in bed with the SEC, etc., why shouldn't the automakers not be in bed with the NHTSA? Seems only fair. Seems almost Wel-fare. Oh, wait, we are talking Toyota and not GM.
      • 4 Years Ago
      All will be forgiven if you release a new Supra that lives up the the old ones.
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