• Jun 28, 2010
2011 Ford Explorer teaser – Click above for high-res image gallery

Brace yourselves. There's another level of electronic nannyism coming to the Ford range of crossovers and SUVs soon. The company has developed a new system that should help counteract understeer in the same way stability control nixes pesky oversteer in almost every new car on the road. The safety gurus at the Blue Oval have come up with a new system called Curve Control that works in coordination with a number of vehicles sensors to determine if the vehicle is turning as sharply as the driver needs it to. If necessary, the system can sample data from the steering wheel angle, wheel speed and vehicle pitch to cut engine power and engage the brakes to slow the vehicle by up to 10 mph per second.

Curve Control will come standard on the all-new 2011 Ford Explorer, and the company says it plans to spread the tech to 90 percent of its high-riding 2012 models.



[Source: The Detroit News]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 36 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      This curve control system just sounds like a way for idiot drivers to continue to be idiots.

      Rollovers are very dangerous and the risk is high in top heavy vehicles. Any system made to reduce the risk of these accidents from happening is a good one. However, at what point do drivers become too dependent on these systems and forget how to drive?

      If you have a Ford Explorer don't try and take that exit ramp like you're in a Mustang!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Smarter cars, dumber drivers.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Does anyone else think the D pillars are f'ing huge? The picture where she's pulling the sleeping bag out of the back is pretty damning. Holy Blind Spots!
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm a huge proponent of removing as many "driver aids" as possible between me and my car or at least an off switch that completely disables the aid. That being said, in my mind those situations are when I am driving my (theoretical) Aston Martin or Corvette or Exige and all the way down to my MX-5 or GTI or SHO. In SUVs/CUVs? I'd rather see the driver aids in place, maybe able to drop them down to a more passive level but no kill switch. My reasoning is that you have no business trying to break the tail loose around a corner in your Enclave or Tahoe nor will you be hitting the track in them. The drivers who do want to perform such shenanigans are more likely to be stupid kids with dad's SUV or it is the dumbass that is too busy on the phone to realize they are about to enter a dog-leg in their Sequoia at 60mph.
        • 4 Years Ago
        One of the best posts I've seen on here in a very long time. This is a Ford Explorer, a F-O-R-D E-X-P-L-O-R-E-R. Think about the demographic that buys the Ford Explorer and how they typically drive them. It certainly is not the first car that pops into my head when I think of aggressively driving down a twisty road. As Alex said, this will probably be used most often by teens hot rodding dad's car or the idiots who are too involved in la-la land while driving.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Ford is systematically designing a car that will be 100% undriveable by SimpleCar.

      Sort of sounds similar to AWD....transferring power to different wheels...except taking it further by braking, etc. Likely one of those systems you'll have and never know is functioning...if done correctly.

      Still, a little unsure of any system that takes braking away from my control.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You've got it wrong. I could drive it...I just wouldn't want to.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Braking when it's unintended is, to me, just as bad as not being able to brake when I want to.

        But I'd rather see how they implement the system before passing judgment.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "...a new system that should help counteract understeer in the same way stability control nixes pesky oversteer..."

        Wait... what? Existing stability control systems can and do "counteract understeer" just in the same way that they "nix pesky oversteer." They are programmed to counteract yaw by firing brake pulses to any wheels that trip the yaw sensors. It doesn't matter which end the slip angle is happening on.

        Trust me, the VSC in my wife's FWD Prius wasn't cutting in because my mildly brisk driving was threatening to hang the tail out.

        I think Mr. Bowman is thinking of traction control. C'mon Autoblog, let this poor man drive some cars ;-)
        • 4 Years Ago
        How is taking braking control away from you?

        The pedal is still there...BRAKE AWAY!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ford is really playing it smart --- by using the European/Japanese product playbook to talk-up all various new-tech gadgetry for the next-gen unibody Explorer. And it makes sense.

        One concern though ---- the rear (D) pillars are a bit wide, are they? That will probably be a major factor in rearview capabilities.
        • 4 Years Ago
        umm...i dunno about you guys, but you are still in control. this isn't a matter of taking away control from the driver, its a matter of helping the driver get back INTO control of an out of control vehicle. Before stability control to control oversteer, ABS to control brake lockup, and this to prevent understeer you would have to be an ACE of a driver to recover from a lot of these conditions. And to be honest, 99% of lawyers, soccer moms, teachers and the likes simply do not have these abilities. If you're a person in the population that insists that your driving abilities are better than any computer, by all means, turn it off. But if my girlfriend, mom, or sister had this explorer you bet your ass i would feel better knowing they were gonna be less likely to get into a wreck because of understeering and them not knowing ho to react to it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Wande Hardware International Industrial Co., Ltd. is a very good factory in China that we deal with, they help us a lot actually. We buy from them nameplate, aluminum extrusion part, CNC machine part, and some aluminum POP display items, contact them now and get approved by yourself:
        Wande Hardware International Co., Ltd.
        Address: Weiye Rd. No. 13, Lianhu 2nd Industrial Zone, Tangxia Town, Dongguan City, Guangdong Province, China, Postal Code 523710.
        Tel: +86-769-88039573; Fax: +86-769-82179880; Email: cheorge@wandehardware.cn; Mobile: +86-13688958804; Skype: gtcheorge; website: www.wandehardware.cn;
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ford is battling the Germans to see who can put more sensors and electronics into a car.
      • 4 Years Ago
      sounds like a weight-watchers program...
      • 4 Years Ago
      It seems that this system will attempt to trail break for you putting more stress on the front tires and increasing the understeer, and making the back end loose at the same time.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No, it depends if you are on or off the power.

        If you are off the power, the inner rear wheel will be braked, helping yaw the vehicle.
        If you are on the power, then the preemptive traction control [VW xds] will help to distribute the power to the outer side, helping to yaw the vehicle.
      • 4 Years Ago
      let's not get our panties in a bunch over this. it sounds very similar to the XDS system that everyone loves on the VW GTI.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Many stability control systems have had this for a long time. It would brake the inside rear wheel to add turn-in if the wheel calls for it as long as the tip sensor on the vehicle doesn't say it's heeling over too far.

      Acura/Honda also has differential drive at the rear wheels with SH-AWD to do this.
      • 4 Years Ago
      In a few years your going to have so many nanny systems the car is going to fight itself trying to go up the trailer to be shipped to the dealer.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The photos are good though!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Curve control.... Isn't that a steering wheel and competent suspension?


      Torque vectoring AWD is nice. I like it, don't get me wrong.

      But sometimes I wonder if this stuff is on the way to becoming too smart by half, and actually back-firing on drivers, making vehicles have less feedback, and less involvement, and setting up drivers to not be ready to react to emergency situations.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Torque vectoring would be nice, if Ford had any such system.
    • Load More Comments