• Jun 22, 2010
2010 Nissan GT-R – Click above for high-res image gallery

Rumors of a hybrid-drive next-generation Nissan GT-R have been floating around since late 2009. And given Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn's wholesale commitment to electric vehicles, it should come as no surprise that the automaker is seriously considering adding some form of battery power to the next iteration of its sports car. Speaking at an event in Australia, GT-R chief engineer Kazutoshi Mizuno confirmed that an alternative powertrain will be a necessity to keep the GT-R relevant and meet future emissions and fuel economy standards.

Both Mercedes-Benz and Audi have already announced plans to build electric versions of the SLS AMG and R8 respectively. According to Mizuno, Nissan is considering a straight battery variant, a hybrid or even a diesel version, although the latter is unlikely. A battery version is certainly possible, but Mizuno also says a hybrid would be easy to do thanks to the GT-R's front engine/rear transaxle layout. The Leaf and other EVs will give Nissan some breathing room on regulations, so a new GT-R is still a ways off. At this point work has yet to start on the new model and no decision has been made on the powertrain.



[Source: The Motor Report]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 17 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Alt fuel that would really suit it? Nuclear Reactor! with rockets.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Can't hear that beautiful exhaust tone.
      Can't have it in manual.
      Can't easily upgrade components.
      Can't take it on a long trip.

      Can't find a reason to buy an electric car.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hat’s off. Well done, as we know that “hard work always pays off”, after a long struggle with sincere effort it’s done.

      Cheap Cars
      *************
      Christina
        • 4 Years Ago
        No spamming please.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Nissan won't go wrong with Carlos Ghosn! And this car will end up being even quicker! You'll download an exhaust sound mp3 file to play on your attached mp3 player though!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Well, I know alot of people won't be happy, but I'm sure Nissan won't sacrifice performance. It's too important to the GT-R formula. It has to kick the $#!% out of everything else up to twice the price.

      I'm thinking at most they would include start/stop, and maybe some in-wheel motors to give it a little extra go. Perhaps a photovoltaic cells on the roof to power some auxiliary systems?

      All I'm saying is it doesn't have to be a bad thing.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Because what this car needed was extra weight...

      (in before SimpleCar!)
      • 4 Years Ago
      Another one bites the dust.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Needs to go diesel or battery to remain relevant and efficient?

      Tell that to Corvette.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This action proof to be a win, win situation. This is a true art work, which will be a success story.

      Cheap Cars
      *************
      Christina
      • 4 Years Ago
      Malaise 2.0 is well underway. At this point the GT-R is going to weigh as much as an early 70's Cadillac. My mother's Volvo S90 ( last of the RWD ones) is 13 years old and still looks and drives new, and I suspect it is the same for all modern automobiles. The future for car enthusiasts looks exceedingly Cuban-esque. If you'll excuse me I need to go fill up my 300C apparently my first and last good, exciting, NEW car and support my local BP station.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hybrids and EVs have horrible resale value, good luck with the trade-in.
      • 4 Years Ago
      "At this point work has yet to start on the new model and no decision has been made on the powertrain."


      So basically this article says nothing at all.


      "for our future model we want it to be more efficient as usual since the beginning of time."
    • Load More Comments