• Jun 21, 2010
Honda had its turn to deal with striking workers in China, now it's Toyota that's feeling the wage demands of Chinese laborers. Tianjin Toyoda Gosei is the joint venture that runs a number of Toyota parts factories in China, and all three of its assembly lines have been stopped due to walkouts. Without the interior and exterior plastic and door parts it makes, Toyota's largest assembly factory in the country has had to be shut down. Toyota says it is continuing negotiations. We imagine that, as with Honda, it will want to get its sales position quickly sorted out in the world's largest car market.

[Source: Hindustan Times]


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  • 29 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Toyota must be holding there breath, after putting a bandaid on all of there recalls. If you own one, you should probably consider trading it, for anything that won't put lives in danger. It is not a matter of maybe, but a matter of when.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Oooooh Richard just slapped in the face!
        • 4 Years Ago
        Dumb. This comment is just dumb. You must have seen "Toyota" in the headline and thought, "Oooh...l can use my worn-out acceleration joke here! It's been so long since anyone read such a comment on a Toyota post...especially on Autoblog. This will be great!"

        Another example of dumb: it's "their". What does holding "there" breath and bandaids have to do with anything in this article? You didn't elaborate. Wait...never mind. I don't want to read more stupidity.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Even the Chinese workers are refusing to build unsafe junk, maybe they are watching out for us. L.O.L.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good question! +1
      • 4 Years Ago
      @hmmwv
      I talked about the possible underlying reason for the difficulty the Japanese are having when running factories in China & elsewhere in Asia, & suggested what they could do to have fewer problems in the future. So my writing is clearly on topic.

      Sorry that your ignorance makes my writing so hard to comprehend.
      Next time learn to read properly & stay on topic yourself. Idiot.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Well, the difference with the Germans is that they officially apologized and manned up to their crimes, whereas the Japanese, to this day, not only offer no regrets, but teach purposefully distorted history to their children.
        • 4 Years Ago
        By your logic the american companies should have trouble dealing with german labor forces yet ford of europe and gm's opel division both seem to be doing fine. Your argument was a hate filled rant, not a constructive comment.

        Sorry that your ignorance makes you unable to see what is and isn't relevant. Next time, learn to use facts that relate to the topic at hand instead of going off a WWII tangent, however truthful it may be.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @bakka

        You sound very HURT. Fact is, this has nothing to do with America & you can never change the fact that Germans are totally different from the continuously LYING Japanese. You are probably a poor Japanese kid in denial. Keep hurting & continue your dirty Japanese lies. hahahahaha.....
        • 4 Years Ago
        @themanwithsauce

        Well..... joe23521 explained everything for me so there isn't much for me to say to your ignorant arrogance... how amusing.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually I was referring to the allied firebombing of german population centers and how the burning of dresden is never really mentioned in american textbooks. The parallel I drew was that we bombed the crap out of germany and only teach our side of the story in textbooks yet the german workforce in the opel plants and ford plants do not strike because of this. The fact that you assumed I meant the opposite proves you don't understand logic and reasoning

        And so long as they are being treated fairly, why would they strike? You tried to make it seem like this is the chinese getting revenge for wwII when it is not. But since your head is obviously stuck in your little make believe version of reality I am done trying to teach you.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @themanwithsauce
        No, the German case is not the same as the Japanese case like you say. But of course you wounldn't know judging by you ignorant posts here.

        If you are still confused about where you went wrong in your pathetic & ignorant thinking, why don't you go ask the United Nations, United States Congress, E.U.Parliament why they all recently had to pass resolutions against the Japanese Government & people for their continued lying. Even Amnesty intl. had to issue a warning to Japan.

        Fact is that the same did not have to be done to the Germany bcus the Germans have continued to take care of thier crimes in an honest & unequivoval way. So there is no need for the international community to make voices agianst Germany like they are doing to Japan.
        I suggest that you go educate yourself instead of making yourself look like a clown.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The labor movement is being reborn.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Maybe the UAW needs to head to China.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Maybe they have, and soon the rise of the UCAW will be announced.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's impressive that Autoblog was so slow in posting this "news" that the strike was already long over and the plant back up and running by the time they posted this.
        http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704638504575318781744542908.html
        Seriously, maybe it'd be a good idea to actually find out what happened before posting about a plant shutdown days after it happened, after the plant was already back up and running.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's a communist country, a "worker's paradise". The government is your union. Other unions are forbidden.
      • 4 Years Ago
      While I agree 100% with what you're saying, if you look at the sheer volume of Japanese goods bought by the Chinese (in China and overseas), the Japanese really has nothing to worry about. The Chinese are more loyal to Japanese brands than the Japanese are. It boggles my mind every single day.
        • 4 Years Ago
        BlackEmblem,

        I don't think you should take my comment personally. When I say that the Japanese offered to regrets, I meant the government has never publicly or official admitted to their WWII crimes against China.

        I'm sure a large number of Japanese people who have had the opportunity to learn about accurate and correct history do have regrets for what their country had done, but that doesn't change the fact that the Japanese government refuses to face and man up to their dark past. That's what I have a major problem with.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Sorry for the confusion ._. we're lucky that the government does not take drastic measures to cast censorship on every single media.. such as the Japanese Wikipedia page on our OWN textbook bias. I'm grateful that there are citizens who know the accurate information... and some are, indeed, resentful towards our history of wrongdoings. I'm with you on that
        • 4 Years Ago
        I read your comment about us Japanese not having any regrets. What makes you say that? We are also frustrated with Toyota being slow in revealing their flaws; I've seen many Japanese editorials that lambast Toyota, and a lot of our enthusiasts are also ridiculing the company that "they are screwed".

        I cannot defend against the bias in Japanese education though. If part our government is responsible for approving the textbook then of course the truth is going to be distorted. I never learned about Nanking and capturing of Nikkei people in America until American education taught me history and got the chance to compare the textbooks. And then we have this rocky relationship with China and Korea, which is - sadly - also manipulative.

        We are not as patriotic as the ministry of education intends to be. While I do not appreciate America for the "Toyota bashing" that they have been doing, it is not as if we are going soft on their ineptness either.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am glad that Chinese workers are opening their eyes and see what is up. The large corporations are nothing without factory workers, you can have all the educated engineering, marketing, accounting, CEOs people but who the hell will assemble it? Chinese people are not stupid, they know what is going on around the world, they know what they have and they know what they are still missing such as a lot better pay (CEOs are not the only people entitled to livable working conditions and a decent livable pay), better working conditions, couple of paid vacations, the days of slavery are really over, no one will do anything for $50-100 per month over the long term. It's also good for working Americans as the cheap labor is actually becoming more and more expensive probably to the point where pretty soon with the distance and logistics calculated in, it will not make too much sense outsourcing most of fields there. But then again, there are other Asian and African countries still available.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is nothing more than the free markets at work (in China of all places). Due to 1 child policy and improved conditions in the interior of China, there are less workers in the coastal areas (where most automakers are based).

      Now workers can shop around for the best wages and given higher inflation (due to the staggering growth of China), workers are demanding higher wages to compensate and some extra....because they can. The automakers will be hard-pressed to find replacement workers as the replacements will ultimately also leave or demand higher wages.

      What the automakers in China can do and will do is invest in more robots and machinery to reduce the labor input to compensate for higher labor costs.
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