• Jun 3, 2010
The Indy Racing League has yet to announce the selection of its new chassis, but in the meantime has announced new engine regulations that will take effect in 2012.

The saga of engine suppliers in the series has been a convoluted one. During its inaugural season in 1996, carry-over engines from CART were allowed, but were replaced the following season by naturally-aspirated V8s provided by General Motors (under the Oldsmobile Aurora name) and Nissan (bearing Infiniti livery). Toyota and Honda came on board in 2003, while GM rebadged its program under Chevrolet as Oldsmobile was being shut down. Three years later Honda got the exclusive and has been supplying all the teams on the grid since, but that contract is nearing its end.

In its place, the IRL has issued a new open formula in the hope of drawing a diverse array of manufacturers to the series. For the first time since splitting with CART (with which it has since reunited), IndyCars will race under turbocharged power. Ethanol will continue to fuel the series, but beyond that, teams and engine suppliers will be free to use as many as six cylinders (in whatever configuration they choose), with displacements not exceeding 2.4 liters and power ranging between 550 and 700 horsepower.

The use of turbocharging and the variety of configurations allowed under the new formula should make for some interesting racing, and we'll be waiting to see which manufacturers jump – or pass – at the opportunity.

[Source: Autosport]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 27 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      I remember the days of Ford, Chevy, and Offenhauser. If a car with a Ford or Chevy engine won the Indy 500, then there were ads touting the win, trying to get customers in the door. The same with Firestone and Goodyear.

      It makes sense to have multiple engine suppliers, since different engines can be tweaked in a myriad of ways.


      • 4 Years Ago
      I've never closely followed IndyCar what with it's constantly changing rules and it divorce and then remarriage to CART, but I take this as a good thing. Right??


        • 4 Years Ago
        This post is laughable, just say you didn't follow IRL/CART before the split.

        There has been no "constant" rules changes. Changes made by CART or CCWS in its final years, were to preserve the series and cut cost. I wouldn't call that constant rules changing.

        All series go through a "tweak" of the rules package here and there, but this move is cheered across the country if not across the world. Back when CART was challenging the Bernie's F1 Circus for attention in the early-mid 90's, it had 3 different chassis, if you don't count The Galles funded Gallmer, Penske's own cars and Gurney's Eagles. You had up to 4 engine manufactures at its peak - Ford (Cosworth), Chevy/Mercedes (IImor), Toyota (TRD) and Honda (HPD).

        I also most forgot both Goodyear and Firestone/Bridgestone were involved.

        All those engines and chassis had "It has to fix in this box" rules system. It worked for years, but the increased technology often means increased cost and pushed out smaller single car teams and American drivers who didn't have funding/sponsorship to buy a ride.

        This lead to King Tony George's jingoist and nationalist bent IRL, Dubah Bush-like push back against Road Racing, saying "Americans want to see American Drivers, Driving on Ovals"

        Oh really?

        We have been screaming at the leadership to put things back like they were before The Split, we are on the road to recovery, Indy 500 ratings were down again and attendance at the Speedway was lower than in 2009.

      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm not sure why they list a range in engine power. Wouldn't it just be easier to say 700hp is the max and leave it at that.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @LaserRed38 - Yes, Indycars currently use NA V8's, but they're wanting to downsize the engines to promote increased environmental awareness and advancement in smaller displacement tech. What a concept, this might actually be beneficial to future passenger vehicles, unlike NASCAR, which seems to refuse to modernize anything.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Nah, because a 700hp single turbo I4 has the potential to be faster than a twin turbo V6. And well, vice versa depending on the tuning/weight/etc.

        This should be pretty cool. Are you sure it's capped at 6 cylinders though? Don't they use V8s now?
      • 4 Years Ago
      lets see if the new manufactures can have as good reliability as the hondas.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Honda has such good reliability because they're forced to and because they aren't pushing for an edge over anyone. Back when they were in CART everyone was blowing engines because they didn't have to make engines last more than a single race and because there was tough competition between the manufacturers. Now they have to go 1200 miles between rebuilds and have a really low rev limit so of course they're not doing to blow engines now. I suspect they'll keep the same rules into the future as well.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I see what you did there. :-]
      • 4 Years Ago
      "NASCAR, which seems to refuse to modernize anything."


      - -Excellent remark by jonbrewer, to which I would like to add that because the NASCAR cars are so heavily modified away from from stock, NASCAR should be NAMCAR.......National Association for Modified Car Automobile Racing!
      • 4 Years Ago
      How is having more than engine manufacture going to save costs. They tried this before and GM dropped out because of reliabilty issues also they couldn't get the power to compete. Why doesn't indy come up with it's own engine design and build it in the USA and wait until the new chassis is approved before they start messing with engine changes. All of the current chassis designs suck. They need to go back and start over.

      Randy Bernard does not know what he is doing and is going to set IRL back even farther than it already is. If they let him stay as CEO.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I understand what you are saying. But thats not how it's going to be.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I've heard some talk (a while ago) of it being Honda, VW, FIAT, and Porsche. But since Porsche is affiliated with VW, they probably won't compete against eachother.
        • 4 Years Ago
        VW wants a world engine... Brand it Porsche for F1, VW for Indy, Audi for endurance racing, Lambo... dunno but you get the point.
      • 4 Years Ago
      My money is on Oldsmobile throwing their hat into the ring as an engine supplier. I mean Cosworth... yes Coswoth.
        • 4 Years Ago
        If Oldsmobile still existed. Or were you being funny? Sarcasm is often lost in these damn comments. :-]
      • 4 Years Ago
      nice!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Throw the 4g63T and the 4B11T in that mix.
      • 4 Years Ago
      F1 look at the Indy this it's a wonderful rule I hope F1 could look at this, an evolute their antiques engines I said antique because they freeze their development almost 3 years ago and the rule force virtually that everyone going to have the same engine desing.
    • Load More Comments