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Ford has teamed up with California-based Coulomb Technologies to give away free charging stations to early customers of its electric vehicles, starting with the Transit Connect Electric.

Coulomb is spending $37 million to install 5,000 of its Chargepoint stations in nine markets including Austin, Texas, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, Orlando, FL., Sacramento, CA, the San Jose/San Francisco Bay Area, Redmond, WA, and Washington, D.C. Transit Connect Electric customers will be able to get one of those charging stations installed at their home or business free of charge if they are in the designated markets.

In addition to the home installations, Coulomb is putting in public outlets that work with its subscription-based billing network. Customers will be able to buy buckets of charging time, sort of how they can buy minutes for a pre-paid cell phone. The Chargepoint station identifies the customer and automatically handles billing and managing of charging while the car is plugged in.

[Source: Ford]

PRESS RELEASE

FORD PUTS CHARGE IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE PLANS; PARTNERS WITH COULOMB TECHNOLOGIES TO PROVIDE FREE CHARGING STATIONS TO SOME OF ITS FIRST ELECTRIC VEHICLE OWNERS
  • Ford Motor Company is partnering with Coulomb Technologies to provide free in-home ChargePoint® Networked Charging Stations for some of the automaker's first electric vehicle customers under the Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program
  • The Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program is part of Coulomb Technologies' $37 million ChargePoint America charging station infrastructure project made possible by a grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Transportation Electrification Initiative administered by the Department of Energy..
  • Coulomb Technologies will begin installing nearly 5,000 home and public ChargePoint Networked Charging Stations under this program in Austin, Texas, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, Orlando, Fla., Sacramento, Calif., the San Jose/San Francisco Bay Area, Redmond, Wash., and Washington D.C.

DEARBORN, Mich., June 2, 2010 – Ford Motor Company will partner with Coulomb Technologies to provide nearly 5,000 free in-home charging stations for some of the automaker's first electric vehicle customers.

Under the Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program, residents in nine designated markets could receive a free ChargePoint® Networked Charging Station with the purchase of a Ford Transit Connect Electric vehicle. The nine markets designated by Coulomb Technologies include Austin, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, Orlando, Sacramento, the San Jose/San Francisco Bay Area, Redmond, Wash., and Washington D.C. The installation of ChargePoint charging stations will begin immediately.

The Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program is part of Coulomb Technologies' $37 million ChargePoint America charging station infrastructure project made possible by a $15 million grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Transportation Electrification Initiative administered by the Department of Energy.

"Both the ChargePoint America and Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Programs help build the necessary infrastructure to make the electric vehicle a more viable option for American consumers," said Sue Cischke, global vice president, Sustainability, Environment and Safety Engineering, Ford Motor Company. "Ford's electrification strategy focuses on providing real world value to customers with a range of driving behaviors and conditions. These programs and charging stations help us deliver an added value to our future electric vehicle owners."

Ford plans to introduce five new electrified vehicles in North America by 2012, providing a range of products to meet a variety of customer needs. These include:
  • A Transit Connect Electric small commercial van debuting later this year
  • A Ford Focus Electric passenger car debuting in 2011
  • Two next-generation lithium-ion battery hybrid-electric vehicles and a plug-in hybrid by 2012.
ChargePoint America will offer home and public charging stations to individuals and businesses. Businesses interested in applying for free public charging stations or consumers exploring an electric vehicle purchase can visit www.chargepointamerica.com for more information.

"ChargePoint America builds upon our established and growing network of charging stations and will in turn encourage consumers to buy electric vehicles," said Richard Lowenthal, CEO of Coulomb Technologies. "Our Department of Energy grant was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also known as the stimulus bill, to provide jobs for Americans. Our products are built and installed with American labor. Every time we ship a ChargePoint charging station, three Americans go to work for a day."

Coulomb's ChargePoint® Network, is open to all plug-in electric vehicle drivers and provides authentication, management and real-time control for the networked electric vehicle charging stations. The network of electric vehicle charging stations is accessible to all plug-in drivers by making a toll-free call to the 24/7 number on each charging station, or signing up for a ChargePoint Network monthly access plan and obtaining a ChargePass™ smart card. Other future payment options include using any smart (RFID) credit/debit card to authorize a session or using a standard credit or debit card at a remote payment station (RPS) to pay for charging sessions. To locate available charging stations, visit mychargepoint.net and click "Find Stations."


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Yeah. Coulomb is going to have to step up to the plate now that Nissan has brought out its sub $17,000 Level 3 charger.

      When your products are easily double the price of your competitor it's time to rethink your pricing strategy.
      • 4 Years Ago
      $7,400 for an in-home charger? Way to go, Coulomb!
      Might as well take some Government money - it's free.
        • 2 Months Ago
        It's actually NOT 5,000 home stations! According to Coulomb's press release http://www.coulombtech.com/pr/news-press-releases-2010-0602a.php , "ChargePoint America will offer both home and public charging stations to individuals and businesses". Presumably that $37,000,000 is mostly the cost of installing public charging stations -- the crew blocking traffic and setting up cones and standing around a lot.

        I have a hard time figuring out Coulomb's home angle. Surely you won't be getting your electricity through their ChargePoint billing network -- unless they drop their own cable from the utility, you're already paying for the electricity. Maybe Coulomb will work to get you a cheaper rate by "Integrating with the utility Smart Grid for demand side management and preferred pricing". But I maintain the best way to do that for an individual to have a smart phone app that talks to the utility and to their car.

        The chargers definitely aren't level 3, Chevy Volt doesn't do it, I don't think the Fords do either, and Coulomb hasn't announced a level 3 charger ( http://www.coulombtech.com/products-charging-stations.php ). Maybe Nissan's adoption of something far faster than Coulomb is why Coulomb's press release doesn't mention the Nissan Leaf at all. 'The Chevrolet Volt, the Ford Transit Connect Electric and Ford Focus Electric through the “Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program”, and the smart fortwo electric drive will be introduced along with this program.' It's not even clear that Coulomb Technology makes its chargers; a recent announcement makes it sound as if 365 Energy Group makes them in Europe. Coulomb is in the charging network business.

        Anyway, the good news is "More than 1000 new public charging stations will be installed by December 2010" in those regions and they claim the remaining up to 4000 stations will be installed by September 2011.
        • 2 Months Ago
        @ mythicalprogrammer,

        Here are real numbers from the White House and CBO:

        http://pajamasmedia.com/instapundit/74459/

        Resume spinning.
        • 2 Months Ago
        EV, You Yanks are beyond help. We burnt down Washington once for you, and what did you do? You REBUILT it!
        Anything that happened to you after that you had coming! :-)
        • 2 Months Ago
        @glock23

        "It's exactly this kind of irresponsible thinking that put us in 13 trillion dollars of debt with no signs of slowing down."

        No, it wasn't. It was the tax cuts that got us into this mess. Two wars, Medicare Plan D, and largest tax cuts in history (reconciliation with Cheney vote ftw). Bush 2 didn't veto much of anything. It also didn't help when the financial market went kaput in 2007.

        Before you say tax cuts wasn't the problem, Reagen and the first Bush had to make new taxes after their tax cuts cause of deficit rising. Reagan had to raise tax which essentially took back 1/3 of the tax cuts and then he went increasing taxes (tax gas and what not). Bush 1 lost his bid for reelection cause he went against his famous quote, "Read my lip, no new taxes."
        • 2 Months Ago
        Here's a handy reference to David Martin's comment that might help you in your understanding:

        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=define%3Asarcasm&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=
        • 2 Months Ago
        I think Glock 23 understood perfectly that I was satirical.
        His comment was on the behavior of the company, which is beyond satire if the info we are getting here is right.
        The only reading which might make this reasonable is if the public chargers are in fact level III, and the home chargers much cheaper, but that is not what we are being told.
        • 2 Months Ago
        Thanks, ski.
        That sounds to me like some kind of half-assed arrangement because the American companies have not got their act together to provide level III charging.
        I seem to remember that it is 50 amp, or some such, just what we need, competing charging standards.
        This one sounds like the new Betamax of standards to me.
        • 2 Months Ago
        Glock 23, David Martin does not live here. He lives where BP is from. Hey David Martin, when are you going to come over here and clean up this mess BP made. I have a row boat you can barrow if you want to skim some oil off the GoM. :) You can even keep any oil you remove. How is BP going to refine all the watery oil?

        @Chris, your graph shows that Bush made our debt about 15 times greater than when he came into office. It shows Obama reducing the debt year after year.
        +136 billion to -1.85 trillion is what Bush did according to your graph.
        • 2 Months Ago
        "Might as well take some Government money - it's free."

        It's exactly this kind of irresponsible thinking that put us in 13 trillion dollars of debt with no signs of slowing down.

        We need to stop this "what's in it for me?" mentality and get some reality back into this country.
      • 2 Months Ago
      I humbly apologize to all of you that will miss the Bush and Regan era ethic of pushing America back as close to before the Civil War as possible, but, I'm excited.

      Incentives for an improved national infrastructure, air that won't kill people and maybe a little responsibility for those knuckleheads at Haliburton in regards to killing all the damned life in the Gulf of Mexico.

      Family owned businesses plus tax breaks for end users.

      Wow! what a novel idea.

      What next? The return of 'Full Service" fueling stations and healthy food.
      Neato!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Has anyone considered rectifying and amplifying the sun's 300 mhz radio waves to charge the batteries of BEVs before? driverguy7.wordpress.com
      • 4 Years Ago
      Infrastructure investments are nothing new -- and they pay for themselves in the long run. After they pay for themselves they save money.

      Think of a microcosm analogy:

      Say your home energy bill is too high for your liking. Say you can't afford to install the insulation and dual-pane windows that would reduce your energy bill. What can you do?

      You borrow the money (OMG!), install the insulation/windows and watch as your energy bill comes down. After a few years the savings will have paid for the initial investment and after that it's all savings...

      Infrastructure investment: so simple, yet so misunderstood....
        • 2 Months Ago
        "in this case the government is borrowing the money to benefit an individual who saves on running costs"

        When the so-called conservatives were in power the government borrowed money so they could give tax cuts to millionaires. We don't run this country, the rich and the corporations do. They have us constantly squabbling with each other. Divide and conquer.

        The country is filled with people that would rather lose everything (or destroy everything) than allow some tiny benefit to go to someone else. It's a clear case of lizard-brain mentality. The rich fkers have you all fighting amongst yourselves for the scraps, backstabbing everyone in your path, lying cheating and stealing to get a tiny inch ahead. Meanwhile they sit in their mansions and laugh at you dumbasses who keep them in power. They pull your strings and you dance and dance. Morons!

        One of these days the rich will lose their power over the rest of us. I don't know how in hell we can do it but we must tear the rich fkers down off their high horses and let them live like the rest of us; struggling for every damn scrap we get.

        http://sociology.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth.html
        The top 1% in America have 35% of all wealth in the nation. The next 19% have around 50% of all the wealth. And the bottom 80% of people are scrambling for a piece of the remaining 15%. Now that's the way it ought to be, isn't it? NOT.
        • 2 Months Ago
        True and I'm happy to pay taxes for small scale programs to kickstart plug-in cars, but in this case the government is borrowing the money to benefit an individual who saves on running costs:
        "The Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program is part of Coulomb Technologies' $37 million ChargePoint America charging station infrastructure project made possible by a $15 million grant funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Transportation Electrification Initiative administered by the Department of Energy."

        As I responded elsewhere, it's not 5,000 in-home EV chargers, they're just a part of the total. And the Transit Connect Electric that gets you a free charger is a van, not a car; it'll be interesting to see if there's a similar program for the Ford Focus Electric. Unlike Nissan, Ford has not indicated production numbers for either vehicle, so Ford's share of the 5,000 could be any number.
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