• Jun 2, 2010
Lexus LFA – Click above for high-res image gallery

If you were wondering whether there was a market for a $375,000 Lexus, wonder no more. Automotive News reports that all 500 copies of the 552-horsepower LFA are officially sold out. Not a surprise if you ask us, considering the fact that there always seems to be a healthy market for ultra-rare exotics with a ridiculously low production quota. But the fact that the LFA is resonating with the European elite is a bit of a shock, as the report claims that one-third of pre-sold LFAs are heading straight for the land of Porsche, Mercedes-Benz and BMW. Lexus even brought eight of the German LFA owners to the 24 Hours of Nurburgring race for some wining and dining.

Lexus hasn't announced how many LFAs would go to which regions of the globe, but an earlier Wall St. Journal report quoted Lexus as saying that Toyota's luxury arm would hand-pick which perspective buyers would gain the right to own the LFA. Looks like we didn't make the cut, not that we had the $375k to spend one anyway.



[Source: Automotive News - sub. req.]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 66 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      its just a halo car. halo cars ARE part of a larger business plan for profit in automotive companies.
      • 4 Years Ago
      There are many who wouldn't even be interested in buying this car if they actually mass produced it. Part of the Lure is the fact that only 500 were produced. This means the car will likely appreciate in value each year, making it a safe investment. There are other ways to go fast if that is all there were after
      • 4 Years Ago
      Thought so...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Now begins the winter of my discontent.
      Acqui
      • 4 Years Ago
      Many of the European elite are now Asians but I don't think that's why it's selling well there. I think if you're in the class of people who are car aficionados and can afford cars that cost this much, it doesn't really matter where they're produced, you will probably want one if it's considered "great" by the automotive worlds, price not withstanding. There is no doubt this car is as good as most of the supercars in terms of performance. It may not be a "bargain" compared to an F430 or Gallardo with similar performance, but for these folks, it's as much about exclusivity as it is anything else. I work for a company that has a couple of these types and they seem to value exclusivity over most anything else.
      • 4 Years Ago
      lol, gross. Money can't buy taste.
        • 4 Years Ago
        But it does buy you an LFA. Which might not taste good, but it sure feels and sounds amazing.
      • 4 Years Ago
      News made all the more strange, because I saw a television commercial for the LFA on CNN this morning... Didn't hear the ad copy, but it has something to do with holding up champagne flute to the exhaust and shattering it?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Remind of their old LS400 commercial with the champagne glass on the hood.


        But whats different this time around...is that Lexus is breaking the champagne glass......


        Awesome and I think it represent what Lexus is trying to do which is change their image
        • 4 Years Ago
        "Pitch" -- LFA exhaust parked on a dyno in front of a microphone revs way up to redline and a speaker piping the exhaust note shatters a champagne flute.

        http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2010/06/lexus-lfa-exhaust-note-shatters-champagne-glass-in-new-perfect-pitch-video.html
        • 4 Years Ago
        That made my toes curl...
        • 4 Years Ago
        That's one of the sickest car commercials I've ever seen in a while.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's a halo car so even if it's sold out the ads have value for the Lexus brand. You don't make halo cars to make money selling the actual car, and Lexus loses money on the LFAs but it's definitely a big plus for the brand.
        • 4 Years Ago
        um... they did a bit more than just tune it, they developed it. just as they've done for volvo and others in the past.
      • 4 Years Ago
      If I was rich, the Lexus LFA would be way down on my list of cars to own. (The top of the list would be the new McLaren MP4-12C).
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'd get the F1... but that's just me.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I don't know why they're keeping this car so exclusive.

      Why spend millions on development and only sell a few hundred?

      It makes zero sense to me. As a business, you're trying to make as much money as possible.
        • 4 Years Ago
        because, neptronix, if they don't then it won't do anything to elivate the brand. look at the R8, it's done nothing for audi. oh wait wait.. nm. you're spot on :). What's kinda entertaining in a car guy sort of way is vw did this with the veyron, but the veyron's totally unmatched by production cars, this car's eclipsed by cars 1/3 the cost or less. if you're going to go balls out with crazy new production techniques at least have them result in some quantifiable gain, vs producing an all carbon monster that's heavier than a half decade platform in the case of the new top spec gallardo.

        whatever, i doubt the people who leased these will regret it at all, the v10 sounds as good as audis, porsches, and lambos, and the lack of a real transmission (as offered by all the previously mentioned brands) is likely a selling point for the target demographic for this car.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "it's a marquee car"

        Then why is it a Lexus?

        Lexus is not a performance division, it is a luxury division.


        Then why does it look like it was styled by drunk orangutans?

        The concept cars had better fit, finish, and design cohesion. These look like development mules being masqueraded as the production versions.

        I'd refuse to buy one just on those grounds, that the actual car didn't meet the design and finishing standards of their own concept car. I'd demand the concept's level of finishing on a car costing that much. That is pretty sad.
        • 4 Years Ago
        its probably how they keep the selling price so high...but agreed, they should sell as many as the can right now to subsidize all the class action lawsuits waiting in the wings........
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's a marquee car.

        It's as much marketing as "for profit".

        That's why.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I don't understand the reason to limit quantities by so much. Even if they build 4 times more (2000 units), it is still ultra-rare and Toyota would reduce its losses or turn a profit on the car. I guess this is how the one-upmanship game is played.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It sure would be stupid, just like, say, sinking a bazillion in F1 to go no where. Who knows, maybe this car is the big turning point for toyota focusing them on a more prudent direction?
        • 4 Years Ago
        There are still returns of scale even with "handbuilt" cars. Fixed costs per vehicle are reduced w/ increased quantities. These fixed costs are for things like tooling (for welding/bonding/body panel molds, etc.), assembly line layout, and facility usage. It is one thing to sell the 500 LF-A's and not build another supercar for years. This would be stupid and their technology investments would lose their value if they can't be applied to other cars.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Its true, there aren't any returns to scale with these specialty cars. Making more just ends up costing Toyota more.

        With a typical stamped-steel+extruded-aluminum car the big costs are the tools. The materials themselves are pretty cheap. The labor cost is equally low.

        Not so with the mega-Lex. Its handbuilt, has processes NASA would be proud of, and uses rare materials in quantity. There is no return to scale here. Same with the Veyron et al.

        The development costs for the really trick tech however is what trickles down into the rest of the range. The LCD displays, the mecha tech control systems, the carbon weaving loom - all will take years to pay off, and likely over 100s of thousands of future vehicles.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "There is no return to scale here. Same with the Veyron et al. "

        spot on, the more they produce does not necessarily equate to less of a loss, maybe 500 is some loss threshold they've set.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Not if the variable costs of production (like materials, labour, etc) are more than the revenue Toyota will make on the car. Sure, if research costs and buying things like that carbon weaving machine were the cause of Toyota losing money on the LFA, then building more could reduce those losses. But otherwise, no. And I suspect this car simply costs too much to make regardless of the units produced.
      • 4 Years Ago
      That's a shame "Seinfeld way"
      • 4 Years Ago
      Besides its exclusivity, I’ll bet that many have bought it for its addictive engine sound & balanced driving dynamics… LFA is about unique driving experience, not record-breaking performance.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Boxer - don't forget the poster child... the 8c!
        • 4 Years Ago
        The problem with LFA is that it took Lexus, or Toyota for that matter, way to long (10 years) to finalize the car. Their “pursuit of perfect” motto has worked against themselves in this case. Had LFA been completed and offered to the public in 5 years instead of 10, its performance numbers would have been quite amazing. I actually think Lexus had made a mistake by taking too long with LFA’s development.
        • 4 Years Ago
        having driven the R8 V10 and done a ride along in the carrera GT I can vouch that addictive v10s and driving dynamics are very alluring, but as both cars are older, cheaper, and quicker, why not make the LFA a unique driving experience with performance, isn't that the point of all that tech and paying many times more (in the case of the R8)? Any V10 motivated supercar is going to have an addictive sound and balanced driving dynamics, that's old hat.
        • 4 Years Ago
        If that is what the results of "the pursuit of perfection" look like...

        I'll prefer flawed cars that look better, and cost half as much. Like Aston Vantage V12, Audi R8 GT, and McLaren MP4-12C
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