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Late last week, Epyon unveiled Europe's first commercial electric vehicle (EV) fast-charging station at a fueling depot in the Netherlands. The Epyon system is capable of delivering 50 kilowatts of juice, which the company claims can charge a nine-person taxi-van or a Nissan Leaf in as little as 30 minutes. Taxi Kijlstra, the nation's largest taxi company, recently converted a couple of its vans over to electric power and will utilize the charger during the work day.
The Epyon charging system is somewhat unusual because it features several outlets, allowing multiple vehicles to charge up simultaneously. The fast-charger supports the 400-volt CHAdeMO-standard, though it should be noted that no official standards exist for fast-charging systems. The charger also features remote configuration and Internet-based communications which allows the Dutch utility company Essent to bill customers for usage. Though it's Europe's first fast-charger, it certainly won't be the last. We imagine demand for EV charging that takes mere minutes is sure to grow.

[Source: Green Car Advisor]


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  • 22 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      Don't mention it. You are welcome to the tip sent to you several days ago anyway, along with numerous others.
      Eventually ABG gets there, some time after everyone else anyway.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Sometime they're right on top of tips, at other times a bit of patience is required.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I think the exchange will be the way forward, without waiting.
      http://youtube.com/watch?v=b-y0ccvByz4
      • 5 Years Ago
      Taxi Kijlstra, bigger than for instance Connexxion... LOL, maybe in the city of Lutjebroek :-)

      OT: it is probably the only application where E already makes sense, "Crown Victoria" cabs, Manhattan island, battery swapping.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think the best Charging station comes from China
      We are secialized in designing,manufacturing various kinds of Charging Station,Gift Box,Jewelry Box,Watch Box, Foldable Storage Box,Leather Wine Box,Pen Holder,Toll Holder,Stationary Holder etc which are basically decorated with fabric, leather,bamboo... And also can produce items according to customers' specific demand.

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      • 5 Years Ago
      "The fast-charger supports the 400-volt CHAdeMO-standard, though it should be noted that no official standards exist for fast-charging systems."

      This to me is a problem. Why should a company (or government) invest in installing chargers, if they may never be used?
        • 5 Years Ago
        It is a problem... but it is like speculative investment.

        Investing more money to install more fast chargers... and they increase the probability that their charger will become standard.

        And it is not the end of the world if they are not chosen... adapters and retrofits can fix that.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I wouldn't worry too much. The SAE committee meets at the end of June to set the standard, and there aren't a whole lot of choices to mull over as far as I know. There's the TEPCO/CHAdeMO standard, agreed on by Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi & Suburu, and I think there is some German idea which apparently has been touted by a few European automakers for prototypes (no real vehicles yet I don't think though).

        At the meeting... "So, should we go with the standard already being used by all the Japanese automakers who are actually producing cars this year and have plans to roll out fast chargers this year using this same standard (the EV project) or should we go with this German idea that no one is currently using? The Japanese one? Great. Whats for lunch?
      harlanx6
      • 5 Years Ago
      It's a step foreward, but a still faster charger is still needed. That 30 minutes of down time during the shift could negate any advantage an electric work vehicle has over a modern, high performance ICE powered work vehicle, especially when initial cost is a large consideration. Time is money, so to speak.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        I like how you just reiterated your point without giving any argument.

        The "niche" you speak of... is a market of millions of potential buyers. Pretty much anyone with a garage or dedicated carport. And definitely anybody with a second car.

        My argument is that people will quickly realize that charging is done at home and work. And that super fast charging is both expensive and unnecessary.

        Your argument is not even an argument. Just a statement of negation.

        "That was never five minutes"
        harlanx6
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Faster would still be better, but we can't have we hasn't been yet deployed. Still with the 30 minute charge, the edge swings toward ICE hybrid.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        For private vehicles, most charging will always happen at home, overnight. Charging on the road will only be for longer distance driving (get a sandwich while you charge) and forgetful moments (just charge enough to get home). Regardless, unlike gasoline, you don't have to stand by the car in the weather while it refuels; you can get a sandwich, use the restroom, surf the web, make a phone call, etc.

        For commercial vehicles like taxi cabs and shuttle vans, they generally sit idle for significant periods. It won't be long after electric cabs start being deployed that cab stands at hotels and airports will start to feature charging stations. For a while, plug-in hybrids will be the preferred choice, since they can run on gasoline if necessary. As drivers realize they have enough range between charges without using the expensive ICE, they'll switch to pure EVs.
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        I agree to an extent, obviously I would love to see 5-10 minute fast chargers scattered around. But I think correct implementation of these fast chargers would suffice for a large majority.The size is a bonus, effectively it's a post sized petrol station.
        We could have a few at a motorway service station, a few at a mcdonalds while you eat, a few at your cinema's car park, some scattered on the high streets etc, a couple at work..
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        I like how you just reiterated your point without giving any argument.

        The "niche" you speak of... is a market of millions of potential buyers. Pretty much anyone with a garage or dedicated carport. And definitely anybody with a second car.

        My argument is that people will quickly realize that charging is done at home and work. And that super fast charging is both expensive and unnecessary.

        Your argument is not even an argument. Just a statement of negation.

        "That was never five minutes"
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        The "faster is still needed" mentality is all wrong.

        EVs should not try to compete with ICE vehicles in range and 'fill up' time. They will not win.

        Instead, 30 minutes is fine. It is enough to get hundreds of thousands of vehicles on the road. And once that happens, the people who thought they NEEDED faster charging or 1000 mile range, will just look at all the happy EV drivers who don't worry about that stuff anymore. The "anxiety" will subside.

        Ask any current driver of an EV, they were worried for about a week or two... then, the fear subsided. Just like people run down their cell phone battery when they first get a new one. They haven't yet learned the limitations. It will take a little time.

        But thinking that EVs won't work until they beat ICEVs in "every" aspect, is just not going to work.

        "The Perfect is the enemy of the Good"
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        "a few at your cinema's car park"

        I would think that if you're going to a movie then Level II charging, which is up to 19.2 kW, would be more than fast enough.
        harlanx6
        • 5 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Better, faster chargers are already out there, and to beat the ICE, they have to be better, or EVs will be relegated to a very small niche.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The question that I'm burning to know is... do you have to live IN say Seattle to qualify for the free charger(ie have a specific Seattle zip code), or can you qualify if you live NEAR Seattle and are getting a LEAF (as in, within 10 miles, 25 miles, 50 miles, 100 miles?)
      • 5 Years Ago
      Live in Seattle, Phoenix, San Diego, or Nashville? eTec wants to give you a free Level 2 charger in return for EV charging study participation.

      "Donald Karner, President and CEO of Phoenix-based eTec, discusses the $100 million grant his company was awarded to undertake the largest deployment of electric vehicles and charging stations in U.S. history."
      (source: http://www.ecotality.com/video2.php )

      I'll take one, please! Not for folks who live in Dallas? Rats!
      • 5 Years Ago
      "German idea that no one is currently using? The Japanese one?"

      American, Japanese or German? Who cares.
      May the best world standard solution be chosen!

      But it seems you prefer the Japan version because there used it on a few Japanese EV test vehicles. Extra clever.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I don't prefer any of them. I don't even know if an "American" quick charge proposal exists. If you call an alliance of Mitsubishi (iMiEV currently selling in Japan), Nissan (LEAF selling this year), Toyota (now in alliance with Tesla, remember) and Suburu (uh, well they're probably working on something) a few Japanese EV test vehicles, then you have a slightly differnet perspective than I do. I can't name one car using the supposed German proposed standard personally, can you? I think the connector is called MENNEKES, but the Mini E doesn't use it atm to my knowledge. Maybe its better, but my gut says the easy answer for the experts is going to be to go with what is currently being used, rather than a proposal that no one is using. Maybe I'll be proved wrong though.
        • 5 Years Ago
        The Smart ED uses the Mennekes connector, I don't think much else does. I'm not sure about Renault Fluence Z.E. and Nissan Leaf in Europe.

        The European standard is not around simply because companies can't agree. The whole Level 1=120V and Level 2=240V charging terminology is USA/Japan focused, I think because it came out of California Air Resources Board work with the National Electrical Code and SAE in the 90s. European mains power is 230V and (IIUC) by bridging two phases can go to 400V, so they have motivation to have a beefier standard -- the Mennekes can handle 400V AC, 80amp. Of course the car would need a much bigger onboard rectifier/charger to support the maximum power -- the charger on initial Leafs is only 3.3 kW while the Tesla Roadster's can handle 240 V at 70 amps. If you're in Europe, do you want $19,000 level 3 DC quick charge stations and a second receptacle in your car, or cheaper almost-as-fast AC charge stations and a single receptacle and more expensive on-board charger in your car?
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