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In preparation for the December launch of its Leaf EV, Nissan has developed its own electric vehicle charge station that will be installed at all of its dealers in Japan.
There will actually be two different chargers available – a standard single-phase 200 volt version will be available at all 2,200 dealers, while a 49 kilowatt fast charger will be installed at about 200 dealers. The goal is to have quick chargers available to customers within a 25 mile radius everywhere in Japan.

The quick charger should be able to charge the 24 kilowatt-hour Leaf battery in about 30 minutes. It takes a three-phase 200 volt AC input and steps it up to as much as 500 volts of direct current with 125 amps. The Nissan developed charger starts at $16,200 for the base version, but Nissan is also offering a variant for hot weather use that adds a cooling system for $19,000, as well as a heated cold weather model for $17,000. Check out the official press release after the jump for more info.

[Source: Nissan]

PRESS RELEASE

Nissan Introduces Quick EV Charger

YOKOHAMA (May 21, 2010) - Nissan Motor Co. announced today that it is commencing sales of Nissan-developed quick chargers through its regional parts sales affiliates in preparation for the December release of its Nissan LEAF, the all new zero emission car.

Nissan developed the quick charger in-house, applying its R&D expertise accumulated in development of EVs and related plant equipment which already installed its EV production plants. This gives the quick charger a competitive pricing advantage at the manufacturer's preferred price of 1.47 million yen.

Nissan plans to install 200-volt standard chargers at 2,200 Nissan dealers nationwide before December, 2010. In addition to that these quick chargers will be available at 200 selected dealers as well. For the convenience of Nissan LEAF drivers, at least one quick-charge unit will be available within a 40-kilometer radius throughout the country.
Quick EV Charger

Nissan-made Quick Charger
Four main features

1. Safety
For safety, the charger maintains close communication with the vehicle, including various safety equipment like an anti-short-circuit monitor. Also it can be used under every climate.

2. Broad compatibility
The product follows the CHAdeMO protocol (*1) so it works not only with Nissan EVs but with those of other auto makers' EVs as well.

3. Temperature durability
In addition to the standard model, Nissan offers variants for hot and cold climates.

4. Competitively priced
The equipment and high technology of Nissan plants eliminate waste in the production process and make the charger elegantly simple, allowing a very competitive price.

<Specifications>
Standard Hot-climate Cold-climate
Model No. NSQC-44-A-1 NSQC-44-B-1 NSQS-44-C-1
Rated input 49kW three-phase 200VAC
Output voltage to 500VDC
Output current to 125A
Power supply connector Compatible with JEVS G 105-1993 (*2)
Dimensions (HxWxD mm) 1,700x750x640 1,700x1,050x640 1,700x750x710
Optimal operating temperature range, -10~40deg(C) -10~50deg(C) -20~40deg(C)
Special features ・Cooling system ・Heater and cold-safe cable
Manufacturer's preferred retail price (excludes tax and installation) (unit: yen)
Standard Hot-climate Cold-climate
Price 1,470,000 1,732,500 1,543,500
One-year manufacturer warranty included

Notes:
*1: CHAdeMO Organization established to encourage quick-charging stations, specifically to increase the number of stations. Quick charger is essential to the spread of EVs, and support related standards.
*2: JEVS G105-1993: The Japan Electric Vehicle Standard is set officially by the Japan Automobile Research Institute; G105-1993 covers the connector for the Eco Station rapid EV charging system.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 50 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Jake,
      I hope I did not come across as unnecessarily pedantic. To be honest, I thought it might have momentarily slipped your mind that the charge would not be to 100% and the battery would not fully discharge - discussion usually does not include that, so for instance the efficiency of the Leaf is often given as around 240wh/mile, when it actually seems to be a remarkable 192wh/mile or so.
      In any case, some readers here will not have your level of knowledge, so it seemed worth while to clarify the point for their benefit.
      Rgds,
      • 4 Years Ago
      What I like about Nissan's approach to EV's is they aren't making excuses

      "Batteries are too expensive"- Nissan makes their own
      "No government support"- Nissan initiates government partnerships
      "Infrastructure too hard"- Nissan sets up infrastructure with help of GE and others
      "Fast chargers too rare and expensive"- Nissan makes a cheaper, simpler fast charger and installs hundreds of them

      Nissan's no-excuses attitute is going to make it harder for the other automakers to make excuses for not offering EV's- which could be the biggest factor to making mass-adoption a reality. By putting themselves in a leadership position on this other companies will have to try very hard to catch up...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Is "JEVS G105-1993" the same as what we have been calling the TEPCO connector for quick-charge stations, i.e., the one that plugs into the left-side charging port in the Leaf?
        • 4 Years Ago
        It is the same. TEPCO is the standard for the shape and size of the plug, it's physical characteristics. CHAdeMO is basically the communications protocol between vehicle and charger as well as for the actual DC power transfer into your battery.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHAdeMO

        • 4 Years Ago
        I think so. TEPCO said they use the JARI connector from Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI), and JEVS stands for "Japan Electric Vehicle Standard" published by JARI.

        TEPCO/CHAdeMO should be publishing its standard soon, but their website in English isn't filled out and I don't know what pages to feed through translate.google.com.

      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm glad I'm sticking with my paid off ICE vehicle. Talk about expensive, time consuming and inconvenient.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's a tradeoff. If you make short trips you can do all your recharging at home and need never visit that 20th century invention called a "gas station", which is expensive, time consuming and inconvenient.

        What's "expensive"? For the driver electricity is likely to be cheaper than gasoline and Nissan has shown that for the provider the quick charge station is cheaper than expected.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I thought you were whining about the topic of this post, Nissan's quick charrger

        How silly of me not to realize you're just bitching about electric cars, my apologies.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Nobody is forcing you to buy one......yet. BWAAHHAAA!

        When the oil runs out, and you've got an ass harnessed to your ICE car, I will glide by silently, laughing at both the asses I've just passed.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Oh boy. Let's start with:

        #35 M. Walsh,
        "Nobody is forcing you to buy one......yet. BWAAHHAAA!
        When the oil runs out, and you've got an ass harnessed to your ICE car, I will glide by silently, laughing at both the asses I've just passed."

        --When is oil gonna run out? That's what I thought. Not for a long time. I have plenty of time between now and then to see where technology is gonna take us. So I'm not worried. I don't feel the need to jump on the band wagon right away on a technology that isn't ready for prime time. So go ahead, if you feel the need to waste your money right now that's your right.

        #36 evnow,
        "@Viper.23 : It is because of people like you we have the BP oil spill and Iraq war. Glad you are sticking with your ICE ..."

        --Really? Because of me? I'm sorry do you take public transportation? Do you own a vehicle or a motorcycle? Do you go to the grocery store? Do you go to Best Buy, Walmart, get your haircut or eat out at all? Then YOU are one of THOSE people that caused the BP spill and the Iraq war also. Take off your blinders and quit trying to dump your environmental guilt trip on everyone else.

        #37 worldcitizen,
        "It is pretty much accepted that the oil price spikes are largely responsible for the economic collapse -- the bank disaster was just the last straw. Or are you referring to the drain on our economy caused by sending some $300 Billion ($3,000,000,000) outside of our country each and every year ($485 Billion in 2008."

        --Wrong. The easy access to credit, loans, free flow of money, buying and selling of junk CDO's, inflated housing prices, lack of gov't and coporate oversight and greed are the prime reasons for the current recession. We've always spent a lot of money on foreign oil. It's short spike in prices is not the catalyst for the recession.

        #40 Joeviocoe,
        "Expensive:--My car is paid off. No need to spend $30,000 or more on the car " By your logic... pencils are expensive because I already own some."

        --Bingo!!! See you understand. If you already owned some pencils, why would you go out and spend more money on more pencils? That would be stupid wouldn't it?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Let's see. Where do I start in responding to your reply. Let's start with:

        Expensive:
        --My car is paid off. No need to spend $30,000 or more on the car and hardware for the house and installation if need be.

        Inconvenient:
        --You always have to be at home to charge your car. There are no charging stations out in the Chicagoland area that are convenient. Don't talk about "future" charging stations because you don't know where they are gonna be built. I know where the gas stations are today and tomorrow.

        Time Consuming:
        --EV's take up to 30 mins. on a super duper high charging station for what an 80% charge? I can get to the gas station and back in 15 mins. and have a FULL tank of gas and if I'm on the road, I can stop along the way and fill all the way up in 5-7 mins.

        And the winner is:

        ICE: 3, EV: 0
        • 4 Years Ago
        Inconvenient. Time Consuming. Expensive.

        You are referring to the oil wars, right?

        You are referring to the economic collapse that begun July 2007 and is only now beginning to lift under the leadership of Barrack Obama. The same economic troubles that have put millions of people out of work, millions out of their homes. It is pretty much accepted that the oil price spikes are largely responsible for the economic collapse -- the bank disaster was just the last straw.

        Or are you referring to the drain on our economy caused by sending some $300 Billion ($3,000,000,000) outside of our country each and every year ($485 Billion in 2008).
        • 4 Years Ago
        Supposed to be $300,000,000,000 - correction.

        If you want to put that into perspective, that would pay the salaries of perhaps 5 million Americans. Or 4.2 million Americans making $50,000 a year.

        Want all those jobs for America? Stop using foreign oil -- I'm not even including domestic oil, just foreign oil. To do this we just have to reduce our oil usage by 70%.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "Expensive:
        --My car is paid off. No need to spend $30,000 or more on the car "

        By your logic... pencils are expensive because I already own some.

        -------------

        A little bit of common sense goes a long way.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Viper.23 : It is because of people like you we have the BP oil spill and Iraq war. Glad you are sticking with your ICE ...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Instead of bragging about how you don't have to go to a dealer for a 30 minute oil change every few months with your electric car, instead you'll be forced to charge your vehicle for 30 minutes at a dealer once every few weeks if you try to venture too far away from your home town.

      I can't imagine driving up to 25 miles to charge, either. A detour 25 miles off your freeway route to a charging station, and 25 miles back again to get back on the freeway. And driving at freeway speeds won't allow you anywhere near the much-discussed 100 mile range.

      Lame.
        • 4 Years Ago
        If there are quick charge stations within 25 miles from anywhere - you'll very likely be only half that distance on average and if you're out and about for any amount of time you'll also very likely pass one on your trip.

        But who cares - the first mass produced EVs won't work for 100% of my driving needs (only 98% of them) so screw it - I'm gonna go buy me a Duramax Diesel instead! The rest of you can go suck my tailpipe while I burn the rest of the oil left in the ground. Screw you guys and your clean, efficient EVs!

        :-P
      • 4 Years Ago
      I hope they have that dendrite problem solved (reference to yesterday's article re: li-on battery fires).

      I wonder how the Leaf's battery pack will fare if it's hooked up to one of these chargers and continually charged/discharged. Will we see degraded battery life, or some unintended fireworks? Also, how will the public react when we hear about the first electric car explosion? It's just a matter of time, and depending on the severity and the timing of the occurrence, it might set back EV adoption by a few years.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I think they've probably tested for that. Excessive battery wear through repeated fast charging is perhaps possible but very unlikely given real world usage patterns. Batteries setting on fire would be totally unacceptable, I'd be surprised if a single Nissan Leaf battery pack sets on fire due to fast charging.... ever.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The original paper on dendrite was talking about the applications of the research for lithium metal anodes for future batteries (the mainstream media turned it into a FUD story on the lithium batteries of today). The Leaf, if it is like most batteries today, uses carbon anodes, which don't have the huge safety problems of lithium metal anodes caused by dendrites. Certainly the batteries will degrade faster with quick charging, but I don't expect any fire or explosions, esp since Nissan and iMIEV have been testing this kind of quick charging for quite some time with no incidents.

        And people should keep in mind how many gas fire/explosions happen every year, and people still have no problem driving them around. Batteries are actually relatively safe ways of storing energy.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I think they had safe fast charging in mind from day 1. Choosing Lithium Manganese for a reason. Not only cost, but durability and safety.

        Also, there is a reason why the fast chargers only charge at max power up to 80%. The chargers are designed for safety of the pack in mind.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Mark Perry in the video said that after 17 years of developing the battery they are very confident that it will perform as specified.
        They will have done a huge amount of fast charge testing.
      • 4 Years Ago
      $20,000 for a level III charge station is much cheaper than people here have estimated! But this is for a car dealer, not a public service station. I wonder how much extra a retail "pump" from Aker Wade or Epyon with credit card reader, networking, lights and that tub for the squeegee that never has soapy water costs.

      Tesla has you coming to the dealer for an extended range Model S battery swap, Nissan for a quick charge... an interesting relationship.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Mark, I read somewhere that the cost to setup a 6 pumps gas station nowadays is upward of $1 million..I'll see if I can find that reference somewhere.

        For just half that, you can setup 10 of these chargers and a retail store on anything you want to sell (since they WILL spend ~26 minutes in your store!)
        • 4 Years Ago
        Plus, with the step-up transformer these appear to have, no need for a 480v supply, which I understand is VERY expensive to get installed.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Less than half of Nissan's original estimate of $45k. Last time there was a lot of arguing about the business case of quick chargers, but at less than $20k, it begins to make a bit more sense. No doubt we'll see even lower prices as more of them are made and there is some competition in the market.

        I think installing at the dealer makes sense. A lot of times it's not the charger that is the most expensive, but actually acquiring the land (with access to electricity) to install it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        consider a station with 10 chargers, the price isn't that much different to a regular gas station.
      • 4 Years Ago
      $19 Grand. That blows away the Coloumb/Aker Wade Level iii chargers (which are $50k to $60k).

      I can see an electric vehicle fast charger network coming a lot sooner. I'm impressed.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Bizarre that in a press release about a quick charger, one that explicitly mentions how important rapid charging is to the adoption of EV's, there is NO mention of how just how "rapid" the charging is. ABG apparently had to do its own math or research to come up with a charging time, since it's not mentioned in the release.

      This makes me wonder about the basic competence of Nissan's marketing --- or the quality and speed of the "quick charger" they're trying to sell.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually, not mentioning a charging time makes sense. The only spec the manufacturer controls on the charger is the power output (49kW in this case).

        The actual charging time will depend on the battery capacity of the car.
        A Leaf at 24kWh, would take 24kWh/49kW = 0.49h = 30 min
        A iMIEV would take 16kWh/49kW = 0.327h = 20 min
        A Tesla Roadster 53kWh/49kW = 1.08h = 65min
        (pretending the Roadster had this socket and was compatible with this charger)

        However, the charger terminology usually goes like this:
        Quick - under 1 hour
        Rapid - 10-20 minutes
        Fast - under 10 minutes
        • 4 Years Ago
        I should have added that the battery management system may not be able to accept fast charge as quickly as 49/kw/hr up to it's 80% fast charge limit, but may either in steps or gradually reduce the rate it will accept the charge, so the theoretical 20 mins to top up the ~15kwh may actually take 30 minutes as the rate of charge tapers off towards the end.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Jake,
        I hope I did not come across as unnecessarily pedantic. To be honest, I thought it might have momentarily slipped your mind that the charge would not be to 100% and the battery would no fully discharge - discussion usually does not include that, so for instance the efficiency of the Leaf is often given as around 240wh/mile, when it actually seems to be a remarkable 192wh/mile or so.
        In any case, some readers here will not have your level of knowledge, so it seemed worth while to clarify the point for their benefit.
        Rgds,
        • 4 Years Ago
        Marketing industrial equipment is a very different proposition to selling to the general public.
        No doubt they will tender in the bidding process for people like the Grater London authority and supermarkets etc.
        The purchasing managers at the institutions which will do the buying will easily be able to stay on top of the relatively few suppliers of these goods and compare prices and performance.

        To be clear on the relative performance of this, it is right at the bottom end of Level III chargers, with London for instance having budgeted around £25,000-50,000 for level III, of 50-250kv
        The level II chargers, which they define as 7-43kw are budgeted at only £3,500-5,000, and can charge in 30- minutes to 3.5 hours, so it is not entirely clear that these prices are much lower than from other suppliers.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @David Martin
        I was reading a few months ago in the sunday times business section, a guy had set up his own charger manufacturing business,i think they were level 2 and similar shape and size to a small post/ street bollard. He quoted about £2500 for each one. The customer would scan a card to pay, but from what I remember the prices to charge were more than what I imagined
        • 4 Years Ago
        @jake:
        the actual energy flow will be less than that.
        No battery drains 100% - the Volt only uses 50% of it's capacity, and the Leaf I would guess uses around 80% of it's capacity which is 19.2kwh.
        Fast charge is only good for an 80% charge, so you might be talking about around 15kwh of charge.
        At 49kw you should get your top-up in around 20 minutes.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @David Martin
        I am well aware batteries do not charge linearly and, in all likelihood, none of the cars will let you charge from 0-100% for battery longevity reasons, so my numbers obviously can't be taken as absolute. My main point was just to illustrate the relative difference of the charging times with different sizes of battery. However, the numbers should still be in the ballpark (20min-1hour range, maybe to 80% charge instead of fully charged).
      • 4 Years Ago
      Looking at the map of UK Nissan dealers:
      http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&newwindow=1&num=100&lr=&ft=i&cr=&safe=off&um=1&ie=UTF-8&q=nissan%20dealers%20uk%20map&sa=N&tab=wl

      It is clear that reasonable coverage could be provided in this way in most, although not all, of England.
      Even Scotland and Wales would be a different matter though, and so in the US for more rural areas it would presumably offer very poor coverage.
      Much of Europe would clearly be well served, although for Germany without tax incentives for EV vehicles on the same level as in many other places perhaps Nissan will be reluctant to bother initially.
      France looks thin on the ground, until one remembers that their partner, Renault, doubtless has a massive dealer network there.

      On the whole I rather hope that Nissan partner some of the supermarket groups, as you can more conveniently go there rather than a car dealer, and they often have their own electricity sub-station so upgrading the grid is not likely to be necessary.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Nissan has selected certain markets in the US. About 20 cities. They need not worry about the rural areas until several years from now, when they release everywhere.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Oh boy. Let's start with:

      #35 M. Walsh,
      "Nobody is forcing you to buy one......yet. BWAAHHAAA!
      When the oil runs out, and you've got an ass harnessed to your ICE car, I will glide by silently, laughing at both the asses I've just passed."

      --When is oil gonna run out? That's what I thought. Not for a long time. I have plenty of time between now and then to see where technology is gonna take us. So I'm not worried. I don't feel the need to jump on the band wagon right away on a technology that isn't ready for prime time. So go ahead, if you feel the need to waste your money right now that's your right.

      #36 evnow,
      "@Viper.23 : It is because of people like you we have the BP oil spill and Iraq war. Glad you are sticking with your ICE ..."

      --Really? Because of me? I'm sorry do you take public transportation? Do you own a vehicle or a motorcycle? Do you go to the grocery store? Do you go to Best Buy, Walmart, get your haircut or eat out at all? Then YOU are one of THOSE people that caused the BP spill and the Iraq war also. Take off your blinders and quit trying to dump your environmental guilt trip on everyone else.

      #37 worldcitizen,
      "It is pretty much accepted that the oil price spikes are largely responsible for the economic collapse -- the bank disaster was just the last straw. Or are you referring to the drain on our economy caused by sending some $300 Billion ($3,000,000,000) outside of our country each and every year ($485 Billion in 2008."

      --Wrong. The easy access to credit, loans, free flow of money, buying and selling of junk CDO's, inflated housing prices, lack of gov't and coporate oversight and greed are the prime reasons for the current recession. We've always spent a lot of money on foreign oil. It's short spike in prices is not the catalyst for the recession.

      #40 Joeviocoe,
      "Expensive:--My car is paid off. No need to spend $30,000 or more on the car " By your logic... pencils are expensive because I already own some."

      --Bingo!!! See you understand. If you already owned some pencils, why would you go out and spend more money on more pencils? That would be stupid wouldn't it?




        • 4 Years Ago
        Minor correction. The recent economic collapse was "mostly" caused by corporate greed and lack of government oversight, failure to regulate (the Republicans policy of putting the most anti-regulation person at the head of each regulatory agency) and the sheer stupidity and short-sightedness of most companies here in the US and elsewhere.

        I say mostly because those excesses made the whole system very unstable, like a house where 9 out of 10 pieces of the structure have been removed. All it takes is a fairly strong gust of wind to knock down an unsound structure. Likewise, our economy was just running on faith and magic dust when the 2008 oil price spike came along. That is what toppled the whole house of cards. We've had gas price spikes numerous times before and they didn't by themselves collapse our economy. What I meant is that the oil price spike came along at the worst possible time and it is widely recognized that this was the final nail in the coffin of our economy. Or call it the straw that broke the camel's back.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Sorry for posting my other response twice. I wanted to respond to my own post the first time.

      Just so you guys understand I'm NOT against improving fuel economy or weening our country off of foreign oil. My next car in a few years will be a hybrid of some sort. I just don't believe EV's are ready for primetime and I believe that it will take at least 10 years before they start gaining any meaningful marketshare. Plus, I love playing devil's advocate with you guys. ;-p
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