• May 20, 2010
If you've been following this year's Formula One World Championship and wonder how the backmarkers – mostly the new teams that joined the grid for 2010 – have been allowed to compete given their lagging performance, know that the FIA is on top of things.

According to emerging reports from the F1 paddock, FIA president Jean Todt is considering re-instituting a threshold in qualifying for each grand prix. Known colloquially as the 107 of the time set by the polesitter. The rule was last enforced in 2002, after which it was taken off the books. But in Todt's eyes, it's about time to bring it back.

Since implementing the regulation mid-season would require unanimous approval of all the teams – including those newcomers who'd be most effected by it – the FIA president (and former Ferrari chief) is looking towards bringing it back for next season, which would only require ratification by 70. For his part, Todt says the measure is not intended to hurt the new teams, but rather force them to get with the program if they wish to compete and not merely fill the grid.

[Source: ESPN | Image: Fred DuFour/AFP/Getty]


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  • 20 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm sure all of this is negotiable depending on how thickly someone lines Bernie's pockets.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Absolutely! Those no-name teams Bernie encouraged to spend $$$$ to join F1 should in no way be allowed to actually compete.

      BTW, Bernie, I think Alonso wouldn't have met that 107% rule in Monaco. Would he get to race anyway since he's a former WC and drives for Ferrari?

      Want to make F1 more exciting? Get rid of Bernie. He is single-handedly responsible for all of F1's troubles right now.

      • 4 Years Ago
      Call me a naysayer, or an alternative thinker, but I *like* the slowpokes out on the course. They turn into moving speed bumps that the regular guys have to negotiate their way around. And in the two races where one or more of the fastest guys had to start from the back (Malaysia and Monaco), watching them rip through the field past the slower contenders has been some of the more exciting racing of the season.
      • 4 Years Ago
      LET THEM TEST! The only opportunity the new teams have to run their cars at speed are during a race weekend, when exactly are they supposed to find the pace?

      107% would probably mean they'd have to be within 9 - 11 seconds of the pole time (most laps are between 1 - 2 minutes) so I don't think this would really affect anyone this year as the new teams are only usually about 5-6 off.

        • 4 Years Ago
        They can (and do) test elsewhere.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ yaroukh: practice !=race
      • 4 Years Ago
      This season proves that more regulation brings with it less excitement.

      Ideas:

      Since the races are (more often than not) won and lost in the pits, not only should they bring back the refueling, they should make it mandatory at every stop. bring the pit crew back into the mix - it could only add to the excitement.

      Force the drivers to get out of the machine before the mechanics are allowed to touch it & then back into the cars after the mechanics are finished. Races are utterly lacking in suspense. Now, as stupid as my suggestion sounds, seeing your favorite driver pack h9mself in and out as quickly as possible against the clock and the competition behind him in the pits would be nailbiting.

      Anyone else have a suggestion?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Affected.
      • 4 Years Ago
      They want to keep out the riffraff? Then they'll have to start by banning Bernie ;)
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am fine with this as long as they are willing to open up the fields. In formula 1 you need to apply to have your car included in the season. Make it like almost every other form of racing in the world. If you show up with a car that passes tech you can qualify for the race. Then put the 107 or 105 rule to narrow down the field.
      • 4 Years Ago
      F1 is irrelevant. Rich old white people with oil sheik friends. Neat. I'd rather go watch WRC or Rally America, spectate, and be interested in cars I can actually afford and meet the drivers in the pits.
        • 4 Years Ago
        you point is exactly why Toyota exec's called Bernie and crew 'elitist'... classic European rigging the game for friends... IRL needs to develop a formula STAT... you could have a great Indy 500 and series next year...
      • 4 Years Ago
      I agree that not only do you have to ALLOW more testing for new teams, you have to REQUIRE it. I think it's absurd that a team can barley patch together a car that has never run before the first GP. I think you need to require 500 laps of pre-season practice before any new team can field a car.

      F1 goes on and on about being the "pinnacle of motorsport" - why not reaquire a team to actually have its s@$t together before coming racing? If a team can't get a car running in time, they don't get to play with the big boys. Duct tape and coat hangers, run what ya brung, and field-fillers are best left to NASCAR.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The guy in the blue kind of looks like William Shatner doing a disco dance........
      • 4 Years Ago
      DNF is greater than 107% of the best qualifing time, so Alonso would not have been able to race in Monaco. Am I interperting this correctly? That seems like not a great idea, given that his climb from last was the most brilliant part of the race.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You are correct. With the 107% rule, Alonso would have been SOL.
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