• May 18, 2010
Land Rover LRX spy shots – Click above for high-res image gallery

When the new LRX compact crossover hits the market, it's goal is to change the way the world perceives Land Rover. Unlike the rest of the marque's range, the LRX isn't likely to boast unbeatable off-road prowess with fuel-sucking power – quite the contrary, in fact. Land Rover has officially announced that in addition to the previously rumored front-wheel drive model, a diesel hybrid version of the LRX will be on the road in 2013. These two new-to-Land Rover features should go a long way in broadening the brand's attractiveness to new sets of buyers interested in smaller vehicles like the new LRX, though the move might risk alienating traditionalists, particularly if the model's off-road ability is severely compromised. (Note: The LRX name still isn't in the books yet, and to this day, Land Rover is referring to the crossover as the "all-new compact Range Rover").

Near the end of this year, Land Rover will start testing its first diesel hybrid prototype, which has been dubbed "range_e." This development vehicle, which rides on a Range Rover Sport platform, will use LR's existing 3.0-liter turbo-diesel V6 and a ZF eight-speed automatic mated to an electric motor. The goal is to produce a powertrain that can achieve a range of around 20 miles solely on electric power, while emitting less than 100 g/km of CO2 emissions. A conventionally powered production-bodied LRX was already spotted testing just earlier this week.

While this technology is still a few years away, Land Rover has assured us that the front-wheel-drive LRX will be available right away when the range launches next year. Never fear, though – Land Rover will still offer the LRX with an honest-to-goodness four-wheel drive system, and we look forward to getting both some on- and off-road time in the new baby Rover. The full details are available in LR's press release available after the jump.



[Source: Land Rover | Images: KGP Photography]
Show full PR text
LAND ROVER ANNOUNCES INTRODUCTION OF 2WD AND HYBRID TECHNOLOGY

Land Rover has announced that it will introduce a 2WD option (in addition to the 4WD derivative) for the new compact Range Rover. On sale in 2011, the 2WD vehicle will emit less than 130g/km of CO2 – making it the lightest, most fuel efficient Range Rover ever.

Jaguar Land Rover has committed to investing £800 million in developing environmental technologies and remains committed to developing vehicles with sustainable features which respond to customer demand.

Phil Popham, Land Rover managing director said: "Land Rover has announced that the all-new compact Range Rover will be available in 2WD. This is good news for the company and for our customers. A 2WD option is just one way in which we are developing our vehicles efficiency whilst adding to the Land Rover range and expanding our customer base. We will continue to make the 'world's finest all-terrain vehicles' for those customers who require 4WD but will also now offer an alternative to those that don't."

As part of the introduction of 2WD, Land Rover will be focussing on three main areas of technology to reduce the weight of Land Rover vehicles, reduce parasitic losses and increase powertrain efficiency. The use of hybrid technology is also part of the significant developments for the larger vehicles in the range. The first diesel hybrid will be available in 2012 and on the road in 2013.

By the end of 2010 Land Rover will be testing the first diesel hybrid prototype called the 'range_e' which is being developed using a Range Rover Sport platform. Tests of this vehicle will use the existing 3.0 litre TDV6 diesel engine featuring a ZF 8-speed automatic transmission. The goal is to achieve a range of 20 miles using electric power only emitting less than 100 g/km of CO2 emissions and to achieve a top speed of around 120mph.

Land Rover has over 60 years of experience developing supremely capable vehicles with pioneering technology such as Terrain Response. Land Rover sells its vehicles in over 160 countries world-wide and is constantly looking at the market place and developing vehicles that customers in all these markets want to buy.


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  • 22 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      That "camoflauge" actually looks really cool.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Agreed, way better than the usual swirlies.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is gonna suck. Only Hope it's a Land Rover ___ and not Range Rover ___. It's Bad enough the RRSport uses the RR badge.
      • 4 Years Ago
      it's not going to alienate any customers, mini hasn't alienated any bmw customers, a butch landrover hatch makes perfect sense.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Can I have a car in that camouflage please?

      That camo is quite cool, dude.
      • 4 Years Ago
      How ever will Muffy and Lance cross the cobblestone driveway to their horse stables?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Don't even bother!

      Really ugly...and I am not referring to the body camouflage.

      The LRX concept belongs in the Tata line-up rather than the Land Rover fleet.
      • 4 Years Ago
      the idea of a FWD Land Rover is sad, howver what no one seems ot understand is if this car doesnt appeal to the most number of people possible Land Rover wont make a profit and will need to be drastically overhauled by Tata. In my opinion it LRX is like what teh Cayenne is to Porsche, an SUV/CUV that can bring in the money so that they could keep giving the enthusiasts what they want, not to mention the Hybrid could silence some enviromentalist as well as appeal to the soccer mom set, and the idea of a AWD model is just simply put in place so that the enthusiasts can have something to like about this car.

      That being said this car looks very sharp, and im hoping this styling direction keeps going for LR, the design director as well as designers for Jaguar and LR need to praised because some of the most beautiful cars in the world are rolling out of their studios.
      • 4 Years Ago
      the hood shape on this and the next explorer look an awful lot alike. same designer perhaps?
      • 4 Years Ago
      So when Jeep does this with vehicles like the Compass, they are considered an abomination, but it's okay for Land Rover to do the same thing because they are Land Rover? Hmmm.
        • 4 Years Ago
        A jeep might actually go off road occasionally. Land Rovers? Rich men buy them for their trophy wives to go shopping in.
        • 4 Years Ago
        People hate the Compass because it's a terrible, ugly car that sucked both off-road and on.

        People like the Patriot better because it's Jeep-like, is less terrible, and has a little bit of off-road capability.

        This Land Rover crossover looks great, which solves Problem #1 that the Compass had. If it's a fun-to-drive or at least comfortable vehicle with good interior quality, that solves Problem #2. If it has at least a little bit of off-road ability (a la the Patriot, equivalent to a Subaru Forester) than that solves #3 and will be plenty of ability for most consumers.

        It could be a contender. Now all I want from Land Rover is to import the next-generation Defender to the States, preferably with diesel.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Jake

        Spend some time looking through all the member galleries (and forum posts if you feel like it) here: http://disco3.co.uk/gallery/index.php?cat=3 - you might be surprised if you think all LRs spend their lives on pavement.
      • 4 Years Ago
      FWD?! Wtf?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Its for poseurs. Trust me. I hate it, too....and hybrids.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think Honda and Toyota should send Land Rover a message that they invented the FWD CUV...a la Terrain Response message Land Rover sent to Ford in regards to the new Explorer.

      A FWD Land Rover is not a true Land Rover. It is like Jeep making the Compass. Some things should never be made just because it can be made.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Having owned an LR3, I think there's more to the current Land Rover than its offroad credentials (which I can vouch for). LR has a distinct philosophy regarding what constitutes luxury, utility and user-friendliness which I appreciate immensely. I think the ergonomics, usability and design of my 2008 LR3 ran circles around my 2010 Audi Q5.

        I think calling the LRX the "compact Range Rover" as they are doing is helping to position the product on the "luxury" side of their lineup. The RRS can go offroad, but not quite as well as the RR or the LR4. The RRS and RR supercharged are both not really meant to go offroad (although they could if you changed the wheels). The new Range Rover is so ungodly expensive that although it can go offroad (very, very well), most people don't take it there since there are other products in the lineup for that purpose.

        So why not have a Land Rover that is divided into two:
        1) "Land Rover" with a focus on the more utilitarian DNA which includes the LR4, LR2, and hopefully an all-new Defender once the current one fails to pass EU crash standards (this is happening in 2012 I think?)
        2) "Range Rover" with a focus on luxury that draws upon the traditions of Land Rover design, but doesn't necessarily focus on offroad world domination. (I do hope they maintain the offroad ability of the full size Range Rover, though, as the ultimate flagship of the brand)

        People will buy the LRX, and sales can't help but help the brand. If the bigwigs at LR know what they are doing, though, they will realize that when consumers flock to the LRX, they will do so party because of the company's impressive DNA, and thus will realize that while the small FWD platform will bring in the cash, it will be just as important to evolve the "halo" products to ensure that people don't forget what LR is about. In my opinion, the halo products are two: Range Rover classic, and Defender - each the ultimate example of what the company can do when given free rein.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Bloke - correct. Even if it's not an SUV, can't go off road, has fwd, and is smaller than an A3, a Land Rover hatch will sell simply on the simulacra of the brand. especially if it comes equipped with a diesel hybrid.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "A FWD Land Rover is not a true Land Rover."

        I agree. you have to know what your brand stands for, what you are good at. LR does not make wagons.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "A FWD Land Rover is not a true Land Rover."

        To a purist, it isn't. Just like the X-Type wasn't a true Jaguar, like the forthcoming FWD BMW B-segment hatch isn't a true BMW, like the Cayenne and Panamera aren't true Porsches. But then again, what is a true Audi? An Auto Union racing car? A rebadged VW Polo from 1973? The truth of the matter is that all car manufacturers have to evolve over time according to the world in which they operate. They're businesses first and foremost, and they must adapt to prevailing market dictates at any given time. Resting on your laurels and providing the public solely with tradition almost cost Jaguar dearly in the late 1980's, and ultimately put Rover out of business altogether.

        LR, like many other manufacturers, are adapting themselves to markets worldwide which exist in 2010 and make money within those markets by being competitive. As long as the heart and soul of the product are conceived by LR's designers and engineers, it will be a Land Rover.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "A FWD Land Rover is not a true Land Rover."

        I agree. you have to know what your brand stands for, what you are good at. LR does not make wagons.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Sad to see a FWD LR.
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