• May 17, 2010

Picture this: You're out on the road, driving in mixed traffic with your choice of drivers to follow. One is a gray-haired senior puttering along in the right lane and the other is a fresh-faced teenager moving briskly in the left lane.

Statistically speaking, which driver is safer to follow? The older driver with the slower reflexes, poorer vision, and cautious driving style, or the younger driver with faster reactions, better eyesight, and driving with the flow of traffic?

The answer: Stay in the right lane, behind the oldster, and let the teenager go on his way. According to statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the safest drivers are in the age group between 64 and 69 years old. And studies of the data reveal that teenage drivers — especially male teenage drivers — are the most dangerous drivers on the road.

"In every motorized country around the world, teenage drivers are disproportionately involved in crashes," said Dr. Anne McCartt, senior vice president for research at the Institute. "The seriousness of this problem has been recognized for decades. Only in the last few years have public policies such as graduated driving licenses been enacted to address the situation. And those laws seem to be working, but fatalities are still high."

Statistics Say Seniors are Safer

In 2008, 5,864 15- to 20-year-old drivers were involved in fatal crashes. That's the bad news. The good news is that number is down by 27 percent since 1998. Driver fatalities for this age group also decreased by 20 percent in the same time period.

However, motor vehicle crashes still remain the major cause of death for teenagers. In 2008, 2,739 15- to 20-year-old drivers were killed and an additional 228,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes. Sixty percent of deaths among passenger vehicle occupants ages 16-19 were drivers.

Senior drivers, like teenage drivers, have higher crash rates per mile driven, especially when it comes to fatal crashes. But seniors don't drive as many miles, so a better measurement of their susceptibility to accidents can be had by comparing crash rates on a per capita basis. Looking at the numbers in this way shows senior drivers have much lower crash rates. Despite their increased risk of crashing per mile driven, relatively few elderly drivers are involved in accidents because of their lower rates of exposure. In addition, the rate of fatalities per capita among seniors has decreased 40 percent since 1975 and is now at its lowest level during this period.

Let’s look at the numbers. In 2008, 15- to 20-year-old drivers made up 8.5 percent of the U.S. population, yet accounted for 12 percent of occupant deaths among all ages in passenger vehicle (cars, pickups, SUVs, and vans). Per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are four times more likely than older drivers to crash. Drivers from 65 to 69 years old made up 3.7 percent of the population, but accounted for just 3.2 percent of all fatal crashes.

Risky Business

Major risk factors contributing to teenage crashes are those you would expect, including:

Lack of experience. Teens are more likely than older drivers to underestimate dangerous situations or not be able to recognize hazardous situations.

Poor judgment. Teens are more likely than older drivers to speed and allow shorter headways (the distance from the front of one vehicle to the front of the next).

Low seat belt usage. Compared with other age groups, teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use. In 2007, 61 percent of all 15- to 20-year-old passenger vehicle occupants killed in fatal crashes were not wearing seat belts.

Preventing Teenage Driving Injuries

"Almost all states have adopted some form of graduated driver licensing," said Dr. McCartt. "These laws are proving effective in reducing teenage crashes."

Graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems are designed to delay full licensure while allowing teens to get their initial driving experience under low-risk conditions. Research suggests that the most comprehensive of these programs are associated with reductions of 38 percent and 40 percent in fatal and injury crashes, respectively, among 16-year-old drivers.

"When parents know their state's GDL laws, they can help enforce the laws and, in effect, help keep their teen drivers safe," said Dr. McCartt.

One of the reasons for their safer driving statistics is that seniors tend to be more aware of their limitations and drive accordingly. "There may be several factors as to why seniors appear to be safer drivers, one of which may be that most teens are novice drivers and seniors have been at it a lot longer," said Patricia Swift-Oladeinde, spokeswoman at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. "But regardless of each person's ability, NHTSA encourages all drivers to solely focus on driving when behind the wheel. After all, one distraction can be one too many," she said.



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  • 358 Comments
      mac2jr
      • 2 Days Ago
      The attorney driving the BMW is the Number one hazard on the road. He or she things he or she is above the law, more important than God, and since he or she is driving an expensive car he or she feels it can outperform all others, which is usually an incorrect assumption. Attorneys are followed by doctors and other professionals that are on the cell phone, or hands-off phone, or texting, or using the GPS or figuring in their head what they are going to do later that day; the last thing on their mind is driving.
      • 2 Days Ago
      Who wants to report whatever560es with me ??
      • 2 Days Ago
      I'm a 15 year old male i went to go get my permit in ohio and they gave a pamflit and it showed the statisticly now girls are one the rise and guys are slowly moving down the accident chart
      • 2 Days Ago
      Seniors may not actually be involved in more accidents but I believe they cause more accidents. Drivers must take additional risks to get out from behind seniors who hog left hand lanes driving at less than the speed limit.
      sjpxmas
      • 2 Days Ago
      SLOW DOWN AND LIVE,,AND ONE THING MORE, THE SPEED LIMIT POSTED IS FOR DRY ROADS, AND CLEAR VISION, SO WHEN YOUR DRIVING AT NIGHT,OR DRIVING IN THE RAIN, AND YOUR DRIVING THE SPEED LIMIT YOUR SPEEDING.
      tyrebitre
      • 2 Days Ago
      The general premise on which the author writes is idiotic: as per their own article - "Senior drivers, like teenage drivers, have higher crash rates per mile driven, especially when it comes to fatal crashes. But seniors don't drive as many miles, so a better measurement of their susceptibility to accidents can be had by comparing crash rates on a per capita basis." The author admits that , when actually driving, both seniors and teens are abject killers: then tries to absolve the seniors by saying we should look at how many seniors there are and not how many are driving: idiotic reasoning (?) at best. Using the one factual bit of information he provided ( that both kill at a high rate while driving, but that fewer elderly killers are actually driving ), the correct answer would be that the odds of the senior you are following being a killing driver are MUCH GREATER. The other false premise the author uses is that simply FOLLOWING someone who has or causes a fatal accident means you , too, will be involved in that accident: again, purely idiotic.
      • 2 Days Ago
      "Senior drivers, like teenage drivers, have higher crash rates per mile driven, especially when it comes to fatal crashes. But seniors don't drive as many miles, so a better measurement of their susceptibility to accidents can be had by comparing crash rates on a per capita basis." How is this statement at all true? If I am driving behind a driver, I could care less the accidents per capita. Accidents per mile is much more important to me in this situation.
      • 2 Days Ago
      This is so wrong lmfao . OF COURSE teenagers get into more accidents, that's because they take R-I-S-K-S . They would be much more safe than someone driving with poor eye sight, plus they would be less likely to take risks in traffic . You're comparing someone blind driving to someone with perfect vision, have some common sense buddy .
      • 2 Days Ago
      Just follow us old farts and we will keep you safe
      • 2 Days Ago
      This article fails logic. As a 30 year old with a clean record, I'm rather unbiased but this part here: "Senior drivers, like teenage drivers, have higher crash rates per mile driven, especially when it comes to fatal crashes. But seniors don't drive as many miles, so a better measurement of their susceptibility to accidents can be had by comparing crash rates on a per capita basis" shows the fault. The crashes per mile driven is what matters. It doesn't matter if elderly are less likely to get in an accident when the main reason is because they aren't on the road. I'm even less likely to get hit by a car driven by a tree, since they never drive cars.
      fkurtin
      • 2 Days Ago
      young people should not be allowed to vote either unless they can pass certain tests.
      • 2 Days Ago
      i'm 18 and haven't been in a single car accident, but! i have witnessed 3 accidents that were only a car length in front of me and i avoided all of them perfectly 2 of the accidents involved older ppl.... maybe you should re-do this little test and all that....
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