• May 10, 2010
What goes around comes around. Ferrari broke ground in the supercar sphere with the 288 GTO and F40, which both used twin-turbo V8 powertrains. The subsequent F50 and Enzo went with V12s, and the 599's mill was based off the Enzo's. But the next model in Ferrari's range-topping mid-engine exotic line will go back to the twin-spool eight-pot.

This directly from the company's chief executive Amedeo Felisa (pictured above with the new 458 Italia), speaking with Autocar magazine. Although a high-output, direct-injection, twin-turbo V6 bounced around the rumor mill, Felisa says no such plans are in place, as customers still look to cylinder count as an indicator of a car's capabilities. The CEO added that the implementation of hybrid technologies – as previewed in the 599 HY-KERS concept – will allow Maranello to continue offering high cylinder counts, including V8, V10 and V12 engines. This is especially interesting because, F1 cars aside, Ferrari has never made a road-going V10. Could be an indicator of things to come, or perhaps just a typo.

Felisa also spoke on the use of carbon fiber, saying that its implementation will, for the time being at least, remain limited to the Enzo stratosphere and not used in its production models. According to Felisa, "nobody today has a real understanding of what happens if you damage a carbonfibre structure." Given its decades of experience with the material in F1 and the hundreds of on-track crashes that it surely accumulated over the years, if Ferrari doesn't understand it, we struggle to imagine who does.

[Source: Autocar]


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  • 23 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think we are getting a V10 soon, by what he said.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Next-gen Enzo?!

      OMG !
      • 4 Years Ago
      they know how to fix carbon fiber after F1 crashes, replace it! Which would be a little expensive for now on road cars.
      • 4 Years Ago
      What is wrong with some of you people?

      This is Ferrari we are talking about - they would not be developing a hybrid powerplant if it didn't kick ass.

      Oh no, god forbid an electric motor - with it's GOBS AND GOBS OF TORQUE - be used in a sportscar. Who would ever want full torque at zero RPM? Who ever would want that?!?

      /s

      What really gets me, is that we've seen cars like the Tesla Roadster (which is pure EV) lay down some nasty performance numbers, and people STILL can't get it through their thick skulls that just because a car uses electronics instead of dino-juice, doesn't mean squat about it's performance limitations. Also, let's factor in that Ferrari's have usually been lower-displacement engines... because of that, their torque numbers have been usually on the "low" end (low compared to large displacement American V8s). Electric motors could do amazing things to bump those numbers up.

      I have absolutely zero fear that a hybrid powertrain is going to "ruin" Ferrari - quite the opposite... I see Ferrari finally proving to the people out there that they can be a very good thing when used correctly in a performance-orientated car.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @ nns357

        Wow, that's just a well through-out argument. Thanks for adding soooo much to the discussion.

        :rolleyes:

        I guess getting launched 0-60 in under 4 seconds and having almost 300 lb-ft of torque at 0 RPM is just not your thing then, eh? And those are numbers are from the Tesla roadster - Ferrari probably has an order of magnitude more R&D talent and money that it could spend on an EV and/or hybrid powertrain.

        • 4 Years Ago
        Now, I think we should be moving on to greater technology than gasoline....

        But a hybrid car? I would not be caught dead in a hybrid car. Worse than gasoline cars to begin with.
      • 4 Years Ago
      dental apportionment anyone ?
        • 4 Years Ago
        I don't think you need good teeth to pick up women when you have a Ferrari... >_>;
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is an epic fail for ferrari,,,,,,,,,why are they still considering gasoline engines still. we are going green in the future . ferrari ceos are a bunch of meat heads bar none .
        • 4 Years Ago
        if you guys know anything about autos ...........the electric car was invented in the late 1800s so no its not in its teen stages just the oil companies killed them off electric performance cars will kill any ferrari on the road
        • 4 Years Ago
        You do realize that this is autoblog you are commenting on right..? You know, that automotive enthusiast website?

        I think you must thought you were on autoblog green. Don't worry, I get lost too sometimes.
        • 4 Years Ago
        You fail at reading comprehension.

        Just because the electric car was invented in the 1800s, doesn't mean it can't be in its teen stage right now. Show me an EV that has better sales than a Camry. Show me an EV that is as reliable as a late model Honda. Oh wait, you can't show me either because they don't exist. Wanna know why they don't exist? Because manufacturers don't have the money to build them at the levels of mass produced cars.

        The Tesla Roadster is incredibly unreliable and extremely dangerous. There's been cases where customers have noticed that the car overheats at extremely high levels.

        Wanna know why the Volt is taking so long to develop? Because they're having problems with the electric drivetrain.

        Those are the reasons why the EV market is still at the teenage stages.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Tatra,

        The one thing holding the electric car back is the mass of the batteries. In order to have a decent range, significant battery weight must be present on the car which diminishes performance capabilities. Weight is the number one enemy on a performance car so until battery technology advances to a point where an electric drivetrain is lighter than a comparably powerful gasoline engine, petrol will be king of the track.

        Once the tech is there (and affordable enough)...I think that the auto industry will be in for a big change. I guess I'll just have to hum engine sounds to myself when I drive around in my electric sports car 40 years from now...
        • 4 Years Ago
        Not instantly switching to EV tech is not an epic fail.

        Not considering or starting development of an EV is the epic fail.

        Face it, EV tech is still sort of in it's awkward teen phase right now.
        Gas engines still have a place. IMHO they should sell an EV model along their gas models and see how it goes.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Long live the F40!
      • 4 Years Ago
      288 GTO... V2.0, sweet!
      • 4 Years Ago
      The elite can afoord to be a little bit different.

      Now that energy is becoming more and more expensive major industries have to adapt.

      As long as the rich and famous have money they will buy the dinosaurs V12.

      As VW has showed. Small engines with Turbo and compressor can provide relatively much power with reduced fuel consumption.

      On carbon fibres:
      Once it brakes in an accident is doesn't provide any resistance anymore. Steel and aluminium can absorb shocs and the energy released in an accident much better by absorbing it.

      • 4 Years Ago
      The caption for the photo should read....

      Come on'a you guy's. you gimme da money'. I give you'a da car. And'a we no use'a one'a part'a from'a Toyota'a. Capesehe?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm really sick of all this hybrid talk with Ferrari and Porsche. YOU ARE SUPERCAR MAKERS! NO ONE CARES ABOUT A FEW MPG WHEN I YOU HAVE A SCREAMING V12 BEHIND YOU! And forget this little "power boost" button. Just make the car lighter or more powerful or both. The formula is really not that hard.
        • 4 Years Ago
        A couple of hybrid Ferrari's will hardly make a dent, it's not like they are mass volume producer. They should keep it out of the cars or perhaps add it for additional power boost like KERS, not to save fuel/emissions.
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