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Click above to view infographic after the jump

Car accidents are the cost of doing business for a society that can't live without its automobiles. Ever since some not so subtle prodding back in the '60s (Thanks Mr. Nader!), automakers have continued to improve the car's ability to not only protect us when accidents do occur, but also avoid them in the first place. Nevertheless, one-third of all accidental deaths in the U.S. per year still involve cars. In fact, someone in this country dies in a car accident every 15 seconds minutes. Sobering stats for sure, more of which can be found after the jump in our latest infographic.

[Source: Auto Insurance for Autoblog.com, Source Image: minds-eye / CC BY-SA 2.0]


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[Source: Auto Insurance for Autoblog.com, Source Image: minds-eye / CC BY-SA 2.0]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 84 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Sobering, but not really surprising when actual driving is no longer the focus of a lot of drivers/cars these days. We cram as much "infotainment" and luxury crap into a car as possible, all the while forgetting we're piloting a 4000 pound hunk of steel.

      If everyone drove a stick with power nothing, we'd be much better of safety wise. A manual transmission at least forces you to focus on the road and what your car is doing.


        • 4 Years Ago
        You said it!!
        • 4 Years Ago
        A manual just forces you to steer w/your knees or shift and steer with one hand while the other holds a phone, coke, burger....safest way is to take the human interaction out of the driving, the more we have to do the more dangerous it will be
        • 4 Years Ago
        @wvuquentin

        The point is not as much about changing gears at higher speeds or not having distractions, its about an overall focus level when driving. When I drive my stick, I feel much more aware of what I'm doing, as the constant focus of lower speeds translates to when I'm on the highway. Sort of like shoulder checking.....I had it drilled into me at an early age, so now I do it automatically no matter what the speed. When I switch over to an automatic, there are many moments where i feel like I go into a trance, and then don't even realize I've been driving for 15 minutes.

        Btw, my power comment had more to do with gadgets, not necessarly steering/braking (no doubt that power steering is great!). Feeling that your car/road is more dangerous though does make people much more alert however. They are building some roads in Europe without an abundance of street signs, to build up the perceived danger, and they've found those rounds to contain fewer accidents.

        I'd be interesting to see a study comparison manual vs. auto's in terms of accidents though...

        @psarhjinian
        Of course it's about bad drivers, I don't necessarily blame the cars. But if someone is a bad driver in a car without any gadgets, they'll be even a worse driver in a car that provides distractions on a platter.

        In the end though, we need to focus on the driver. I feel like we need much more stricter tests when it comes to licensing. It seems way too easy to get and maintain a license in this country.




        • 4 Years Ago
        This isn't really true.

        It feels good to say, and it certainly makes good copy, but despite the proliferation of gadgetry, accident rates per mile driven have actually been going down for decades, and cell-phone and distracted-driving laws haven't had measurable impact in the short time they've been around.

        Don't feel bad, though: you're falling to the same fallacy that claimed Ray La Hood, and this is his job.

        The facts are that a) bad drivers will be bad drivers, even if you put them in a Geo Metro and b) designing cars and traffic systems to minimize or avoid injury saves more lives than trying force austerity on drivers who will, honestly, just find something else to do anyway.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think I swear more than that per DAY while driving. Especially if I have to go down to Chicago.
      Dennis
      • 4 Years Ago
      I have a white vehicle and I'd buy another white vehicle. White stays cool in the summer and white does appear cleaner even when dirty. Besides, there are SO many different shades of white. White doesn't have to be bland. Throw some chrome wheels on a white vehicle and tint the windows and it looks very classy.
      • 4 Years Ago
      ehm...a Civic and an Audi A3 are of the same size, same category, albeit quite different price tag.

      • 4 Years Ago
      Here in Arizona where it hits 117 degrees and over, white cars are desirable because they reflect the sun. Also, the heat here does a number on car paint, causing it to fade and turn ugly. We have a huge number of white cars here, and I actually like the way they look. In this environment, a pretty dark car (which I also like the looks of), is not only hot to ride in but it's usually covered with so much dust that you can write on it.
      • 4 Years Ago
      How many of each model has been sold in relation to the other vehicles that they compared too.....These reports are so misleading.....What is the average if the person or persons drive responsibly???? I have driven over 1.8 million miles and never had an accident. Have had some close calls with other stupid drivers coming at me but I am very conscious when driving....all the time...
      • 4 Years Ago
      I find statistics that are presented as # per time period very misleading. As are total number. Because there are over 300 million people. Some don't drive/ride in cars. Some drive around for a living.

      What I would want to know is what is my chance of dying if I drive one mile down an urban (35mph) road to pick my kids up from school. % per mile driven etc.

      A recent podcast from Freakonomics gave the statistic that driving is so safe now that if the only cause of death was car accidents and we drove constantly; the average life expectancy would be 250. Each death in a car accident is a tragedy but not covered in this particular graph is that 50% (or so) of the deaths the people aren't wearing seat belts.
      • 4 Years Ago
      SO MIORONS WHAT ARE THE 3 DEADLIEST CARS. YOU NEVER SAY
      • 4 Years Ago
      Accident != crash.
      • 4 Years Ago
      When I was a kid...a very long time ago...there were approximately 50-55,000 deaths per year. A lot fewer vehicles, a lot fewer miles per year per vehicle, slower speeds and fewer vehicle safety features. Why fewer now? I have no idea, probably a combination of reasons; better roads, better vehicles, etc.

      Here in SoCal the number of people yakking on their cells - in spite of the recent law - seems to approach 40%...or more. Pedestrians step off the curb w/out making eye contact, not realizing they will always lose. In any other state they will most certainly lose. Who are they. Not scientific, but most seem to be females, older teens and young to mid-20s.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Finally, a good reason to buy a black car.
      Dennis
      • 4 Years Ago
      The Ford Ranger has been the number one selling small truck since the 80's. I find it very odd that they are the least safest. You would think they would improve it over 30 years!

      Another thing, I thought the Buick Lucerne was the bigger car, not the LaCrosse?

      And, white cars make up more accidents because white is the more popular color, that makes sense.
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