• Apr 28, 2010
Nissan Leaf EV – Click above for high-res image gallery

Nissan has begun taking $99 registrations for its all-electric Leaf, and the early results are very encouraging. The Japanese automaker has reportedly already received 7,000 pre-orders in the U.S. and another 4,000 orders in Japan. Nissan had been expecting pre-sales of roughly 20,000 vehicles, and early pre-sales show that the initial estimates may have undershot reality. Whatcar? reports that orders have been so strong that Nissan expects that it won't be able to fulfill demand for its emissions-free vehicle when it hits dealerships in late Fall. The 11,000 hand-raisers Nissan currently has in the bank doesn't include any buyers from the UK, as our across the Pond allies aren't eligible to pre-order the Leaf until July.

Nissan reportedly claims that its forthcoming EV will be cheaper to buy and run than the king of the hybrid hill, Toyota's Prius. The Leaf will carry an MSRP of $32,780 (plus $2,200 for the charger) when it goes on sale, which is closer in price to the Lexus HS 250h than the Prius, though government tax breaks of $7,500 per all-electric vehicle brings the base price down to a much more manageable $25,280.



[Source: Whatcar?]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 54 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Would like to know the cost per mile over say... 5 years?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Depends on how much you drive, and the cost of gas, but for what it's worth:

        http://www.wired.com/autopia/2009/08/nissan-electric-leaf/

        "Mark Perry, Nissan’s director of product planning, said the cost per mile is 4 cents if you figure gas is four bucks a gallon, electricity is 14 cents a kilowatt hour and you drive 15,000 miles a year. Compare that to the 13 cents a mile you’ll pay in a car that gets 30 mpg"
      • 4 Years Ago
      I still think it needs whiskers on the front, and a horn that makes catfish croaking sounds.

      Speaking of croaking, think of all the people that run out gas, in fossil-fueled cars. What are people going to do when they run out of *charge*? It's not like you can walk to the gas station and buy a gallon or two of electrons.
      • 4 Years Ago
      That's amazing- people actually want to buy this thing.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This car is so incredibly impractical to me. Great for city dwellers, I suppose, but I'd be left stranded on my way to work. I couldn't imagine getting this over the Volt.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I see, well I just using crispy's statistic. Even at 100 miles, that's not that far. I mean I couldn't even visit my family from central Texas to SE Texas (175 miles).
        • 4 Years Ago
        I really only mentioned it wouldn't work for me. :)

        Although, were you to want to go further than 40 miles.... Do you buy a gas powered car as well? Do you take another form of transportation? If you do, then why not just do that anyways instead of spending nearly $40k on this? You could spend $16k on a Fiesta, drive 40 miles @ 40 mpg and use a gallon of gas a day. I admit I'm not great at math, but the Leaf just doesn't seem logical to me, at least on the surface.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I don't understand the reference to 40 miles. The Leaf has a 100 mile range.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Perfect for city dwellers IF said city dwellers can plug it in at night.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Chibi Chaingun... city dwellers... city dwellers... why does that sound familiar. OH. THAT'S WHERE NISSAN'S RELEASING THE CAR, URBAN CENTERS. what aren't people like you getting. no, this isn't the car for you, great, it's not the car for most, but when you deliberately identify the intended market in your post as some off handed result of the cars development it just comes off irrelevant.

        The car is designed for city dwellers in the markets it is being released in, what's so hard about that.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Similar to many technological innovations early adapters will determine if this idea works now or must wait for sometime in the future.

      It's funny how some people can't wrap their heads around paying more for the Leaf (or Volt) versus a similar sized vehicle. That same argument can be made about any number of consumer goods. Remember flat screen tv prices when they first came on the market?

      If enough demand exists to satisfy R&D costs and prove to the manufacturer that its a viable concept and they're reasonably assured others will purchase in the future the economies of scale will hopefully bring prices down.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It looks like a short, fat woman who is trying to fart.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Demand would be even higher if it weren't hideous.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It looks like something that should be filleted, dipped in batter and sizzling in a frying pan.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Haha, I'm a fan of this car and I have to agree. Its pretty rough lookin.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Tikki
        The Leaf's range is 100 miles (city). You're thinking of the Volt's 40 mile battery range.
        • 4 Years Ago
        yep it got beat up with an ugly stick, heck most EV's volt included are simply ugly. The problem I have with this type of vehicle over the Volt is, can anyone actually state they've never been in a traffic jam on their commute? What is one suppose to do, turn all electronics off to save power, because in this you better. How nice sitting in a traffic jam on a hot sunny day without the ability to run anything, sounds great!

        and my commute is 46 miles round trip.....OUT!
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am in a non target area. So if there are 10000 reservations and they only bring 20000 a year over I am looking at a 6 month wait after release. If they hit their target of 20000 reservations I am looking at a 1 year wait after release. So to me waiting until December of 2011 or about a year and a half after putting a deposit down feels like a shortage.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'd say it's much more practical for suburbanites - I don't know any apartment dwellers (me included) that have an electric socket by their parking spot - or if you don't have assigned parking, you'll have to hope one of the few spaces that does is free.

      It's a great second car for suburban families though. Private garages almost always have a socket somewhere, and suburbanites rarely travel more than 40-ish miles a day. For instance, my mom lives 4 miles from work and my dad 7. For their neighbors (and for most of the town), the train station to get to NYC is
        • 4 Years Ago
        ... the last two apartments i lived at had them... i'm guessing thats why sd is one of the pilot cities.
        • 4 Years Ago
        haha, the glory of Canada, every spot parking spot pretty much has a plug in-front of it. but they are meant for block heaters, I think if you plugged an electric car into it, it would trip the breaker.
        • 4 Years Ago
        EXACTLY!...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Isn't this exactly what happened when they started taking reservations for the Smart Car? LoL. History always repeats itself. Another epic failure in the making.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I wish people would stop saying "emissions free" when referring to electric vehicles. It takes plenty of emissions to produce them and produce the electricity used in the vehicle.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz - agreed. maybe he should, i dunno, spend an hour educating himself on the topic next time. ugh, could you imagine if all he cost in terms of pollution of shipping oil, oil exploration, environmental costs of spills, etc were tallied up, might as well if we're going to head to the high hills to try and discredit electric.

        Who wants to research the markets aside from LA and SD where this car is being released and where the power is coming from. I know the exact station which would provide power for mine were I to purchase one, it's gas fired, and I don't see how said leaf would pollute more, even with natural gas power in play than my R32.
        • 4 Years Ago
        But that's exactly the point. People want to save the planet by driving a hybrid or electric vehicle. The problem is that these vehicles may (I haven't done the research but I have heard different professional opinions on the matter) produce more emissions in their production than a standard vehicle, especially when it comes to battery production and shipment/extraction of raw materials. I agree that electric vehicles are most likely the vehicles of our future, and I am in favor of them. It's just the terminology of "emissions free" that I have a problem with.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "...The problem is that these vehicles may (I haven't done the research but I have heard different professional opinions on the matter) produce more emissions in their production than a standard vehicle..."



        And what constitutes a "professional opinion" these days? Rush Limbaugh? or some idiot commentator on FAUX News :rolleyes:

        You are CLEARLY regurgitating the BS email that was circulating the internet a couple of years ago that claimed to "prove" that a Hummer was somehow less polluting to the environment than a Prius to manufacture and maintain. Of course that claim was found to be completely and utterly bogus. Obviously some people are still using made-up information as "facts" to further their agenda.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @zamafir If your electricity is generated 100% by coal, an EV will be pollute about the same as a Prius.

        If your electricity is generated from natural gas, it will be significantly cleaner than a Prius.

        If your electricity is generated from nuclear, hydro, geothermal, wind, solar or other renewable, that's about as clean as it gets.

        Considering that the nationwide average is about 40% electricity from coal and has been dropping the past 5 years or so, an EV is the only car that pollutes less as it gets older.
        • 4 Years Ago
        In every vehicle emissions discussion up to now (EV's), the discussion has always been about tailpipe emissions. Vehicle emissions/pollution has never included the emissions of every drilling platform, supertanker, refinery, train/tanker truck, gas station lighting and electricity to run the gas pumps, military action to retain access to oil, etc. As such, calling an EV zero emissions is perfectly acceptable using the standard applied to every other vehicle.

        I'm not saying it's wrong to include the pollution from electricity production, but you then have to change the dialog/framework for pollution of every other vehicle in the market to include the pollution from their fuel sources as well. Or you go with the definition of vehicle emission up to know and call EV's zero emissions vehicles.
      • 4 Years Ago
      That's great news. I really want to see this car take off. It will open the doors to cheaper more efficient electric cars in the near future.
    • Load More Comments