• Apr 28, 2010
Citroën Nemo on its tippy toes – Click above to watch the video after the break

We've recently had two shining examples of the importance of having a properly functioning electronic stability control system (ESC) in new vehicles. The instability of the 2010 Lexus GX 460 is a known problem and Toyota is working to address it. The Lexus was equipped with ESC, it just wasn't effective enough. Over in Europe, the Citroën Nemo failed miserably in a test conducted for a British consumer magazine because it lacked ESC entirely.

Which? is something of a British counterpart to Consumer Reports and had recently worked with German auto club ADAC to evaluate a trio of compact MPVs from Fiat, Peugeot and Citroën. The Qubo, Bipper Teepee and Nemo all share the same basic design, but only the Italian variant offers ESC as an option (and then only on diesel models). The Peugeot and Citroën do not offer ESC at any price. Needless to say, the results on the dreaded "moose test" (also known as the "elk test") were not good. This particular test is a double lane change obstacle avoidance maneuver at 50 miles per hour.

After the Citroën Nemo flipped over in this test, the remaining testing of the Peugeot was abandoned. PSA, the parent company of the automakers, has announced that it will start installing ESC on the Nemo and Bipper diesel models in July of this year. A version for gas engined will have to be developed and installed starting in fall 2011. Video of the test is after the jump.

[Source: Which?]




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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 64 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      I can't help but feel some of these tests are stupid. Most drivers would have either slammed on the breaks or simply swerved without swerving back into their original path of travel. Especially at a rate of 50 miles an hour.
        • 4 Years Ago
        i take it you don't drive on the highway?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Safe emergency driving is about properly avoiding the obstacle with a sufficient and not excessive emergency maneuver, then safely returning to your lane of travel and continuing on. Just because you would freak out and slam into the elk doesn't mean everyone else will.

        The test is a good one. I wish they used it more here in the States.
      • 4 Years Ago
      oh damn! the rear tire sidewall gave way enough for the wheel to hit the ground O_O
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Help! I've fallen and I can't get up!"

      /hee hee
      • 4 Years Ago
      Thanks for the lesson on the origin of soccer/futbol, but how does that relate to car stability again?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Currently I reside in Belgium and must attest that quite a few families with modest means choose to buy this kind of cars. I thought that such cars were for small businesses only, but producers recently moved them to family car market (e.g., using animated Simpsons as spokespersons). Such cars are rather cheap and provide extra space, while short wheelbase makes it easier to park in the tight "European" parking places.
      Since the price is the main selling point, I guess many buyers skip a lot of extras, including stability control.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I find the results of this test rather puzzling: the car that preceded the Citroën Nemo in the test is a Fiat Doblò, which is exactly the same car as the Citroën Nemo. It is the result of a joint venture between Fiat and PSA (Citroën and Peugeot). The only difference between these cars is the badge, so if one of them passed the test, all of them should too.
      Strange, isn't it?
        • 4 Years Ago
        "Fiat Doblò, which is exactly the same car as the Citroën Nemo"

        Doblo isnt the same car, its Fiorino, all made in Turkey, most of the car is also designed in Turkey, thay arent 100% same they might have different suspension setups as htey have also some different engines.
        • 4 Years Ago
        The Fiat has ESC. The others cannot even get it as an option. It states that in the article.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Did you even read the article? Or watch the video? The Fiat has stability control. The others didn't.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Haha, I think (or hope) he got the point. :)
        • 4 Years Ago
        Did you not rwad?!? The Fiat HAD ESC you bumbling fool!

        Ok ok, just kidding! :)
        • 4 Years Ago
        The Doblo is nothing to do with the Nemo or Bipper. The Fiat version is the Qubo.

        The Doblo is a completely different car altogether.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Did you even read the text?
      • 4 Years Ago
      Soccer moms across Europe take note.
        • 4 Years Ago
        "Although I must disagree with you in that you don't see many estates these days in the couple of European countries I'm familiar with: Ireland and Italy."

        Really? Estate variants of Mondeo, Insignia, Focus, Astra, Passat, et al (not to mention the German Q-car marques) are pretty popular across western Europe - Eire is evidently an exception.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'm sorry my sense of humor is too dry for your tastes.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yes I do know all of where it came from. It's called a joke. Please people, get over it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Course, here in Ireland, we have the ultimate made-up sport: Gaelic Football as well, hence "soccer" being a preferred term here.

        Although I must disagree with you in that you don't see many estates these days in the couple of European countries I'm familiar with: Ireland and Italy. You'd see a lot more in Italy but the micro-econobox is still king there. You'll see a lot of these SWB van conversions there because they're simply handier for getting around narrow streets as a lot of Italian towns have. Having been, er, victim of having to go around the north of Italy in a rental Renault Espace LWB, I can see the natives' points.

        As for Ireland, being the most expensive country to buy, run, fuel, tax and insure a car, the smaller the better. The likes of the Renault Mégane Scenic is very popular, but these little things are starting to find their feet in this market too. They're quite popular with taxi drivers because it provides them a good base vehicle for access for disabled people, since we don't have our own proprietary taxi platform, nor do we use the UK's Black Cabs, for whatever unknown reason. Coupled with the fact they're extremely cheap, and usually quite frugal (to the point of being under-powered in some cases), they're definitely gaining a foothold in this market. Estates are becoming increasingly rare here. Usually driven by farmers.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I'm not familiar with Western Europe. Ireland tends to be an exception in a lot of things: It's one of the few markets where the Nissan Tiida is on sale. God knows why.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Dude, jokes require a certain pre-requisite. It's called "being funny".
        • 4 Years Ago
        Actually, it's OK that it does not have stability control...If I had to drive that ugly thing I'd rather hit the moose anyway.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Farmboy - you know that "Soccer" was derived from the term Association Football, to differentiate it from "Rugger" (Rugby Football)? While both are strictly called Football, It's just that the former is most commonly referred to as Football and the latter as Rugby these days.

        As far as European "soccer moms" are concerned - few drive van-derived leisure vehicles such as this. Most will plump for MPVs, mini-MPVs or estates.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Shouldn't that be futbol moms?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Soccer = football

        American football = handegg
      • 4 Years Ago
      Laissez la voiture roule!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Guess they'll have to re-badge the Bipper Teepee the Tipper Tippy!
      • 4 Years Ago
      The average american won't be reacting like the driver does in the moose test. The average driver will scream, cover their face with both hands, letting go of the wheel and stamp both feet down on the brake as hard as they can....They just hit what ever there is in front of them.
      • 4 Years Ago
      To me, this always seemed inevitable. There aren't many smaller cars like this in the US, but when I've gone to other countries, I've seen these and always felt that they were just asking to roll over in a sharp turn.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I am aware of that, but I believe this article is talking about these types of small, top-heavy vehicles; not large SUVs.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The "elk test" has been around for decades before stability-control existed. Proper suspension design (and a center of gravity that is not too high) shouldn't rely completely on stability-control to bail it out.

      If I remember correctly, the "elk test" also caused Mercedes to rework the original A-class ...
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