• Apr 23, 2010
Nissan Leaf EV – Click above for high-res image gallery

How many people plunked down $99 to register for a Nissan Leaf? According to an email from Nissan, "As of this morning, 6,635 customers signed up to reserve a Nissan Leaf." The reservation line has only been open about 70 hours (Nissan began taking reservations late Tuesday), so that's a pretty solid rate of ~100 an hour.

Katherine Zachary, who handles PR for Nissan North America, told Autoblog that during the first three hours, 2,700 people registered for the Leaf, and that it's been a steady flow ever since. However, if you were one of the people with an itchy trigger finger Tuesday, don't count on getting your Leaf first. Nissan is looking at where the most demand to help determine where to roll out the vehicles. So far, Zachary said, 75 percent of the people registering for a Leaf are from the areas Nissan has targeted as early markets – places like Tennessee, Oregon, San Diego, Seattle and the Phoenix/Tucson region in Arizona. "Through the work we have been going and what those markets have been doing, people are ready," Zachary said. Most of the reservations are from California, but a "fair amount" are from Georgia, due in part to the extra state incentives for plug-in vehicles there.

So far, the upper SL trim is beating the SV base trim level three to one. This makes sense to us, since the extra $940 does get you quite a few nice features. As for there being any cancellations yet, Zachary said she hasn't heard of any at this point. Someone will be the first, but apparently no one wants to do so quite yet. Nissan will continue to issue periodic statements on the number of reservations as time goes by. We'll be ready.



[Source: Nissan]


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  • 26 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Since this is a pure electric car, how will the heat/ defrost work? Will that effect the range at say -30? Anybody in AB land know?
      • 4 Years Ago
      So what happens when the battery begins to loose charge and/or dies?!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Woah! GM better hurry up with the Volt since the credit reduction only lasts for the first 200,000 electric cars.
      • 4 Years Ago
      That's actually quite a lot for a car that nobody has specs on.. has seen in person.. test driven.. etc!

      I think Nissan will find out that there is a BIG demand for practical electric cars. If this car meets expectations, they could have a real winner. ( well, until someone releases a car with better range for the same price ;) )
        • 4 Years Ago
        I doubt anyone will, without taking a huge loss. Like you said, though, pretty impressive!
      • 4 Years Ago
      A lady that commuted 20-30 miles a day dont need a 400 Hp car. 60 gallons a tank
      car.
      • 4 Years Ago
      @dhammond: if you have been keeping up with the launch of the nissan leaf, that $99 is just a registration fee to get in line for one which is refunded at the time the car is launched.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I would love to see practical electric vehicles succeed. Based upon information that I got from Nissan's web site FAQs, I have three concerns.

      The first concern is regarding a response to the “Assuming the power steering is electric (vs. hydraulic), is there a solid steering shaft, or is it drive-by-wire?” The response was “Steering is drive-by-wire”. I certainly hope there is a direct mechanical linkage for the steering with electric assist, but their answer seems to indicate otherwise.

      On Nissan's web site, the question “What kind of warranty will this car have?” received the following response “The details of the warranty are not yet determined, but our warranty coverage will certainly be competitive”. I am guessing the cost of the battery to be about half of the original MSRP, or about $16000. Some may not believe that my guess is worth much or may not care, but I would want to know that the battery was warranted for at least eight years. I would not want to risk having a 6 year old car that needed a $16000 battery.

      My third concern reflects my experience with the $2100 tax credit that I had on my 2007 Honda Civic Hybrid. I only got about $1900 even though I paid much more than $2100 in federal taxes. Most of the articles about the LEAF seem to lead the consumer to believe that the $7500 credit can be counted on to reduce the price by then entire amount of the tax credit. People that expect the full $7500 may end up with a nasty surprise as tax time.
      • 4 Years Ago
      • 4 Years Ago
      They say right in big text on their website that it's minus the emissions required to produce the electricity. Did you miss it? Anyway, even if emissions were 100% the SAME as a gas engine (they're not), I'd rather my money go to a California energy plant than to the homophobic, misogynists in the Middle East.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I like this car. So sad this model was not available for the Philippine market.
      the only available are Nissan X-Trail and Nissan Sentra 200.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I know...but i fully expect a lot of people declining the purchase when the reality of payments and terms hits home......
        • 4 Years Ago
        Really? You think the average San Dieogan, Los Angeleno, etc was hoping this would cost $10,000 or whatever ends up being $99 a mo? seriously? doubtful. I'm certain most putting down the deposit can afford it, and a majority are wealthy with prius, et-al, in the garage for green cred.
      • 4 Years Ago
      wait till the customers find that the financing is at regular rates and without a credit union or a LARGE down payment, that the monthly is WAY steeper than they initially thought when they plunked down their "mere" $99............
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