• Apr 13th 2010 at 3:43PM
  • 62
2010 Plug-in Prius Prototypes – Click above for high-res image gallery

The reason we just got to drive the new plug-in Prius hybrid in San Diego is because Toyota is introducing the vehicle to the U.S. during the company's second Sustainable Mobility Seminar (see our full coverage of the first event, held in 2008 in Portland, OR here, here and here). Now that the event is in full-swing, the company has announced some more details about how and where the car will come to the U.S.

150 units will be used across the U.S. by "universities, corporations, city, state and federal governments, car sharing programs and other subject matter experts." Some of the groups that will get PHEV Priuses are: Qualcomm, Silicon Valley Leadership Group, Southern California Air Quality Management District, University of California, Berkeley, University of Colorado, and Portland State University. There will be more groups announced in the future.

Also included in the press release of this announcement (find it after the jump) is some more information about the PHEV's three-part lithium-ion battery pack:
The first generation lithium-ion drive battery's unique composition is the key to the PHVs expanded all-electric power. The battery is composed of three packs, one main battery and two additional packs. At vehicle start, the PHV operates in all-electric mode, drawing electrical power directly from battery pack one. When pack one's battery charge is depleted, it disconnects from the circuit and pack two engages and supplies electrical energy to the motor. When pack two is depleted it disconnects from the circuit and the system defaults to conventional hybrid mode, using the main battery as the sole electrical power source. Pack one and pack two will not reengage in tandem with the main battery pack until the vehicle is plugged in and charged.

Toyota has also started up a new ESQ Communications website (that's Enviriomental, Safety, Quality to the rest of us) with all sorts of details on the seminar, the PHEV Prius program and more.



[Source: Toyota]

PRESS RELEASE

Toyota Stages Sustainable Mobility Seminar

- Explores Future Mobility with Global Experts in Energy, Science and Economics
- Launches Environmental, Safety & Quality Communications Web Site
- Provides First Drive of Prius Plug-in Hybrid Demonstration Vehicle
- Announces PHV Demonstration Program Details and Partnerships

LA JOLLA, Calif., April 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. (TMS) today stages the "2010 Toyota Sustainable Mobility Seminar" featuring presentations and panel discussions from global experts in energy, science and economics, exploring the future of mobility.

"Our business is no longer simply about building and selling cars and trucks," said John Hanson, national manger, environmental, safety and quality communications. "To provide truly sustainable mobility for the future, we must explore new energy sources, new partnerships and new ways of doing business."

The seminar morning panel entitled "Drivers for Change" includes:

* Dr. Mickey Glantz, director of the Consortium for Capacity Building at the University of Colorado, discussing climate change and society.
* Dr. Michael Dettinger, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, discussing water scarcity and its ties to energy.
* Dr. Frank Wolak, department of economics at Stanford University, discussing the economics of climate change.
* Dr. William Shutkin, LEEDS School of Business at the University of Colorado, discussing urban planning and transportation.
* Gordon Feller, CEO of Urban Age Institute, panel moderator.


The lunch speaker, Dr. Scott Samuelson, National Fuel Cell Research Center, University of California, Irvine will speak on "The Role of Fuel Cell Technology in the Future of Transportation."

The seminar afternoon panel entitled "Powering our Future" includes:

* Dr. Jan Kreider, University of Colorado, discussing low carbon fuels.
* Robert Bryce, author and editor of the Energy Tribune, discussing rare earth metals and their use in advanced batteries.
* Jay Whitacre, Carnegie Melon University, discussing advanced batteries.
* Alison Peters, managing director of the Deming Center of Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado, panel moderator.


The keynote address at dinner will be from Dr. Peter Wells, Neftex Petroleum Consultants, on the geopolitics of energy. Tuesday's event can be viewed beginning at 8:30 AM (Pacific) on http://www.ustream.tv/channel/toyotausa.

The seminar for business, automotive and environmental media and analysts also offers attendees the first opportunity to drive the 2010 Prius Plug-in Hybrid (PHV) demonstration program vehicle. The Prius PHV expands Toyota's Hybrid Synergy Drive technology with the introduction of a first generation lithium-ion drive battery that enables all-electric operation at higher speeds and longer distances than the conventional Prius. When fully charged, the vehicle is targeted to achieve a maximum electric-only range of approximately 13 miles and will be capable of achieving highway speeds up to 60 mph in electric-only mode. For longer distances, the Prius PHV reverts to "hybrid mode" and operates like a regular Prius.

The first generation lithium-ion drive battery's unique composition is the key to the PHVs expanded all-electric power. The battery is composed of three packs, one main battery and two additional packs. At vehicle start, the PHV operates in all-electric mode, drawing electrical power directly from battery pack one. When pack one's battery charge is depleted, it disconnects from the circuit and pack two engages and supplies electrical energy to the motor. When pack two is depleted it disconnects from the circuit and the system defaults to conventional hybrid mode, using the main battery as the sole electrical power source. Pack one and pack two will not reengage in tandem with the main battery pack until the vehicle is plugged in and charged.

The Prius PHV demonstration program will place 150 vehicles in the U.S. with universities, corporations, city, state and federal governments, car sharing programs and other subject matter experts. Today Toyota announced that demonstration vehicles will be placed with Qualcomm, Silicon Valley Leadership Group, Southern California Air Quality Management District, University of California, Berkeley, University of Colorado, and Portland State University. Additional program partners are being finalized.

The PHV demonstration program will allow Toyota to gather real world vehicle-use feedback to better understand customer expectations for plug-in technology. It will confirm, in a wide variety of in-use applications, the overall performance of first-generation lithium-ion battery technology and, hopefully, spur the development of public-access charging station infrastructure.

More importantly the program is aimed at market preparedness for plug-in hybrids, which will arrive at Toyota dealerships in 2012, along with an all new battery electric commuter vehicle.

"It is imperative that consumers fully understand both the potential and the challenges involved in the electrification of the automobile," said Hanson. "Through this demonstration program, and a similar program for our hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, consumers will be informed on how these new mobility alternatives will fit with their transportation needs, their lifestyles and their budget."

This year, TMS and Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, Inc. are expanding a separate demonstration program for the FCHV-adv, hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. This cross-affiliate program will place more than 100 fuel cell vehicles with universities, private companies and government agencies in both California and New York over the next three years.

For example, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has received 10 Toyota FCHV-adv vehicles, which will be in use for approximately two years. The vehicles will be used primarily in and around John F. Kennedy International Airport with one of the vehicles set up for active use on the runways.

Toyota's expanded demonstration program will provide one of the largest fleets of active fuel cell vehicles in the country with the primary goal of spurring essential hydrogen infrastructure development. The demonstration program also will serve to confirm the reliability and performance of fuel cell technology prior to its 2015 market introduction. Over the course of the FCHV-adv demonstration program, as new hydrogen stations come online, additional regions and partners will be added.

In conjunction with the Sustainable Mobility Seminar, TMS Environmental, Safety and Quality (ESQ) Communications launched a new Web site, www.toyota.com/esq, to inform and educate interested parties on key Toyota environmental, safety and quality initiatives. The Web site is a portal for all Toyota ESQ information and was designed as a resource for both media and consumers. It will offer information on such topics as advanced safety features and initiatives, philanthropic endeavors, green manufacturing, intelligent transport systems, quality processes and procedures and more. This resource for news, events and seminars continually will be updated and expanded, including information from important and influential "other voices" outside of Toyota.

All Sustainable Mobility Seminar presentations, panel discussions, Q&A and take-away materials will be available online. In addition, the site will provide "dashboard" details on advanced technology demonstration programs and vehicle performance information. As demonstration program vehicles gather miles, data such as fuel economy, miles driven, charge incidents and additional content will be available on the Web site. Providing clear and transparent in-use data to customers is a key step to market preparedness.

"True sustainable mobility will not be achieved without societal acceptance," concluded Hanson. "In the end, the customer and the market will decide
."


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 62 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      To toyota (to bad they probably don't care but any more) PURE garbage what a waste of parts lol i don't know why other then to cater to the now, until they get there next halo car ready maybe. With all the problems their going through they should have just tried to debuff the scare stories. I find it hard to believe them all but there has to be one truth for every lie right... Anyway the Prius isn't bad but IMO the Volt will be the better of the two... just to late... it could've been EV4 going on 5 already if they wouldn't have killed the car. sux to be the public hopefully the leaf will sell millions.....
        • 5 Years Ago
        "The volt is meant to be a primary car.
        The leaf works in a lot of situations but doesn't replace a primary car. It's best for city."

        Alot of situations? You mean the rare, long road trip? A volt won't work either for the rare instances where I'm hauling a fridge or sectional couch, but that doesn't mean it couldn't be a primary vehicle. Same with the leaf. For the rare instances where the primary car won't work out, people will rent a temporary replacement. Its not exactly a new concept.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Please learn to English.

        I really don't understand how you can say that the Volt is better than the Prius. The Volt doesn't exist yet and when it does it will cost much more than a Prius. In fact the Volt is going to have a hard time competing against the Leaf due to its price. So when you do the comparisons you will find that the Volt costs much more than a Prius and probably the Leaf and yet it isn't really that much better than either of them.
        • 5 Years Ago
        /this should have been here not attached to the above comment thread.

        The Leaf will be my "primary" car and my "only" car.

        On the once-a-year occasion when I need to move a couch or drive cross country I'll rent whatever vehicle I need at that time. I haven't used my own vehicle for trips in over 5 years now and then only once in the last 8 years. I don't want to own that type of vehicle - I'd rather use someone else's ride for that kind of hard driving.

        And don't forget that the fast charger network will be online in just a few years. Then I'll only need to rent another vehicle for moving a couch.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Brant, I hope English is NOT your first language.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I suppose i didn't convey what i meant very well.

        What i meant by 'primary car' is say.. if you owned *one* car, the Volt ( or a PHEV like it ) would be more suitable.

        It makes sense that you'd have a gas car hanging around for long trips if you had a Leaf.

        What i was trying to get at.. is that the functionality of a pure EV, a PHEV, and a Hybrid are all different in terms of green-ness to practicality ratio :p
        • 5 Years Ago
        Comparing the leaf and volt are like comparing apples to potatoes.

        The volt is meant to be a primary car.
        The leaf works in a lot of situations but doesn't replace a primary car. It's best for city.

        Saying one is better than another is kinda silly. It's like comparing a motorcycle to a car.

        As for the Plug-in Prius, it offers 1/3rd of the electric range of the Volt and won't run with traffic on the highway. Of course it's gonna be cheaper - it does less.
        • 5 Years Ago
        neptronix, Leaf will be my primary car. Once in a while when I need to drive more than 80 miles a day, we will use our ICE car.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I'm guessing they just integrated two extra Lithium packs in addition to the normal NiMH pack, which is why it drops into normal hybrid mode after the first two packs are depleted. Now, depending on the difference in cycle life versus discharge rate/amount, they may stick w/ this config or go all Lithium.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It could be just for testing, or maybe the two different pack chemistries behave in a way that makes using them in different roles cost effective.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yeah, i don't know what's up with that. This seems like a hack :/
        • 5 Years Ago
        I like the modular approach to enable different range option. When higher density battery pack become available, you can squeeze in another pack to extend the range. Each pack has its own cooling fan so this design is very flexible!
        • 5 Years Ago
        Interesting comment, roflwaffle, you could be right about them just tacking on two lithium battery packs along with the existing NiMH pack that all Prius' have.

        The lithium packs would require a different charger and control software anyway and that would be the easiest way to get the extra range.

        BTW, 13 mile range and max EV speed of 60 mph is a little disappointing. I was hoping for at least 20 miles AER and "normal" freeway speed capability.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I really would have been happier if you'd used the "spy-shot" I sent you a few weeks ago of the one I saw on the 405 freeway for this story. Sigh. : (
      • 5 Years Ago
      oops, ya a few mistakes.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Hmmm ... this really sounds like patch work. A compromised design by committee ?

      But, I expect Prius to be the cheapest PHEV (before rebates) ...
        • 5 Years Ago
        >> Hmmm ... this really sounds like patch work.
      • 5 Years Ago
      It is nice watching Toyota play "Me too!" in attempts to steal some spotlight from the GM Volt.

      Don't worry, you'll get your big brake eventually.


      Oops, I mean 'break'. ;-)


      But seriously, I am glad to see Toyota move forward with this. But it is pretty clear that they are only doing it reluctantly.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Nepto asks, "Do you suspect EV1-esque foul play?"

        /No, just total and complete incompetence on the part of GM executives.

        PS, Ford is now the #1 auto maker in America due to Toyota's recall troubles, according to CNNmoney website.
        http://money.cnn.com/2010/03/02/news/companies/auto_sales/index.htm?hpt=T3

        PPS, GM should make the cars that Amricans want to buy - electric cars and trucks. That is the only thing that will make them the #1 auto maker again.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Right. And even in year 5 their plan is to produce only 50,000 Volts.

        They are positioning the Volt to be nothing but a green halo. Very disappointing and flat out stupid when you consider that they have in their hands THE revolutionary technology in the voltec drive system. They could clean up in the auto market. But they won't.
        • 5 Years Ago
        TheTom, that's pretty grim. Maybe that's just their initial forecast?

        Cancelling the Converj was a bad sign IMO.

        Do you suspect EV1-esque foul play?
        • 5 Years Ago
        The Leaf will be my "primary" car and my "only" car.

        On the once-a-year occasion when I need to move a couch or drive cross country I'll rent whatever vehicle I need at that time. I haven't used my own vehicle for trips in over 5 years now and then only once in the last 8 years. I don't want to own that type of vehicle - I'd rather use someone else's ride for that kind of hard driving.

        And don't forget that the fast charger network will be online in just a few years. Then I'll only need to rent another vehicle for moving a couch.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Interesting. Well, Ford deserves it... they've been working at it for some time now.

        Yeah, GM's direction confuses me. The only car i have hope for is the Volt, but even that is dwindling. The Cruze looked cool until i saw the interior.

        I wonder why GM is pimping the Volt super hard when their business plan is to not sell many.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yeah, because the VOLT has been available to the consumer for how long?
        • 5 Years Ago
        GM Volt will be produced in such small quantities as to make it a mere footnote in automotive history. Their first year production is only 10,000 which is far too few to make any difference to anyone.

        Compare that to Toyota, who have produced over 500,000 Prius' so far. And they are ramping up production, not holding back like the idiots over at Renaissance Center.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Toyota began testing the Li-Ion Plug-in Prius in 2006, while the Volt was still a daydream in some GMer's head. Toyota said they're not interested in Li-Ion, but began selling Li-Ion mild hybrids in Japan back in 2003, and recently bought their own Lithium mines in Argentina.

        If Toyota is so reluctant to do a Plug-in, why does Toyota's plug-in Prius have 6.5 millions miles of testing on it (re: Toyota Dec 19, 2009) where as the Volt only has 500,000 miles (re: GM April 2010)?

        One of the big differences between Toyota and GM is that for good or bad Toyota is exceptional about keeping secrets where GM spouts off everything that comes to mind.
      • 5 Years Ago
      the prius 'gearbox' is not suited for plugin operation. the car needs to be changed to series hybrid config
        • 5 Years Ago
        neptronix,
        I said 200 rotations per second. that's 12000rpm. and it's not the drive motor, it's the secondary motor in the prius used for changing the gear ratio and it has to go that fast just to allow the primary motor to drive the car without pulling the ICE too.
        with my comments you can't just take a drunken glance and ramble on.
        how many total mistakes do you have to make before you stop underestimating me so..
        • 5 Years Ago
        while you can change the parameters of the powersplit design, it will never be a good solution have an extra motor running at 200 rotations per second just to avoid disturbing the ICE..
        the ICE has no business being mechanically coupled to the wheels.
        • 5 Years Ago
        did they know what they were doing when they mocked lithium and stayed with nimh too..

        if they knew what they were doing (and allowed to do it) they would have made fiber glass ultra light (series) electric drive lithium EVs several years ago.

        not that you will want to understand nor remember and admit to yourself that you were wrong when in the future I am proven right by their slow adaptation to truth.
        • 5 Years Ago
        They should probably make it out of a fiberglass monocoque while they are at it.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I absolutely disagree with everything that you just said. Physical construction and real-world testing is absolutely necessary to ensure the success of a product. No matter how complex and accurate numerical tools are, you will NEVER be able to replicate the inconsistencies that come with living in a real world. You can come close, yes, but you will never have 100% correlation between theoretical calculations and physical test data.

        Pick any experiment and do it twice. I can guarantee with absolute certainty that you will not get 100% correlation between experiment 1 and experiment 2.

        Engineering is not theoretical physics. It never will be.
        • 5 Years Ago
        People don't like to hear anything you say...because it's nothing but garbage. You have no technical knowledge to back up any statement that you make, thus discrediting each and every one.

        The Gen-2 plug-in (JDM only) can go 62mph on electric only from the factory. I know, because I've driven one. I can only assume the Gen-3 plug-in will best that with advances in motor tech since they designed the last model. The drivetrain absolutely is capable of above highway speeds with a few minor tweaks in gearing. Toyota's engineers know what they're doing.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It's not about hacking parameters, it's about making sound design revisions, and if you change the gearing a bit, it WILL (not sort of) work as a series hybrid at highway speeds.

        "It's just not as good as a simple series hybrid"

        You have no factual, concrete information to back that statement up, as there are no current series hybrid vehicles on the market that you have mpg, efficiency, and durability information on.

        Again, automobile mass production has more variables in it than cost and weight. Safety, durability, ability to be manufactured, average lifetime fuel economy, along with many other variables contribute to the design of a hybrid system as well.

        "Noone will use this design down the road"

        Here you go again with your absolute statements. Unless you have a time machine that can travel into the future and see exactly what's going on, YOU DON'T KNOW. Stop acting like you do.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Those hacks were to the Gen II Prius. This article states that the Gen III PHEV can get up to 60 mph on electric. It seems reasonable to me to think that if you're going faster than 60, you're probably driving further than 10 miles. (Probably... not in all cases, but in most).

        You may always be right, but your premise is flawed.
        • 5 Years Ago
        You need to be changed over to shut-the-hell-up config.

        You are not an automotive engineer.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Gen1 Prius had 6,500 RPM limit for MG1. Gen2 and Gen3 has 10,000 RPM.

        This PSD simulator supports THS-II (gen2 Prius). Just make sure you click on THS to switch to THS-II mode.

        http://homepage.mac.com/inachan/prius/planet_e.html
        • 5 Years Ago
        Why not? It is as simple as a differential.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "Fiberglass has been around since the 1940's and nobody has used it in cars to my knowledge."

        Not that I really want to back Dan up, but the Corvette is a specific vehicle that has always used fiberglass. Also, fiberglass was used in bumpers for a while - Pontiac's Endura bumper was a noteworthy example. Noteworthy for breaking.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_GTO

        Overall, though, fiberglass is not particularly popular in automobile applications.
        • 5 Years Ago
        I know it's a hybrid hybrid. and I know you can hack the parameters and change the design a bit to make it sort of work. it's just not as good as a simple series hybrid.
        it's very clever only for the prius type of operation but it's stupid for plugin hybrid operation. deal with it. you know I am right.

        noone will use this design down the road. some lame engineers might go with it to begin with because they are herd minds scared to think on their own and do the obvious and superior. but soon enough the prius config will be gone forever.
        but you will conveniently have forgotten your current position and will likely never admit I was right all along.
        if you are afraid to think on your own and feel a need to rest on authority then rest on what Chevy is doing with the Volt. that's a series hybrid. that's the right way even though they got some parameters wrong.
        • 5 Years Ago
        you chose poorly
        • 5 Years Ago
        hehe wow, people didn't like to hear that.
        however I am right. as usual.
        you can google around for those who have hacked the prius for plugin operation. by default it is limited to something like 43mph battery only operation, faster than that the ICE kicks in. then there is one team that has hacked it further to go all the way up to around 65mph on battery only BUT for that to work they have to let the ICE spin at 1000rpm and the generator spin in reverse at its maximum 6500rpm. that has to do with the way the 3 parts are coupled. it's very clever for the prius type operation but entirely misplaced for plugin operation.

        this is a website that shows the prius power split device. quite informative: http://eahart.com/prius/psd/

        when will you people learn that I am always right : ) always :)
        • 5 Years Ago
        Yes Dan, you're totally right. Because Toyota can't re-gear or modify the transmission they invented for the Prius to change the ratios for the electric motor and gas engine.

        I'm shocked that your phone isn't ringing off the hook with job offers from major auto manufacturers. I hope your brilliant mind isn't going to waste.
        • 5 Years Ago
        well I google something wordy all the time :)
        would it be possible for you to just recognize that I knew how the prius works and you didn't?
        and that my engineering knowledge extends vastly beyond that difference.
        would it kill you to no fight me and instead learn from me.

        I know it's a crazy thought to learn from superior knowledge and understanding but why not give it a go, just as an experiment..
        if I say something you don't understand why is the case, just ask. without the stupid animosity. chances are I know what I'm talking about.

        the truth cannot be defeated and it's very foolish to try. the truth is a powerful ally if you will let it be.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Actually running an electric motor at 200rpm is fine because you have all the torque from the start. All electric cars are using one gear anyway.. even performance EVs use just one gear. Electric motors perform best at low RPMs. Look at the tesla... extremely long gear, runs from 0mph to about 140mph.

        I'll acknowledge 'superior knowledge' when i hear it. So far i haven't heard any of that from you. I'm waiting.

        letstakeawalk: yeah, people also buy fiberglass hoods.. but they're known for cracking too, so people with money actually get carbon fiber. That's the problem with fiberglass. It doesn't tolerate intense vibration or collisions very well. Dan likes to say all cars should be 200lbs and made entirely of fiberglass. Can you agree with him there, or does that sound like crazy talk to you too?
        • 5 Years Ago
        If you lock the "mechanical leg" (aka the planetary carrier) of the PSD, you get a SERIES HYBRID. MG2 is directly connected to the wheels, powering the car. Yes, MG1 is spinning, but you're not powering it at all. The only losses that you get from spinning MG1 are frictional losses in the bearings of MG1 (very very minimal). Right now, the only limitation on max EV speed in the THS is MG1 max speed, which can be easily fixed with a small change in the gearing of the PSD.

        A lot of people fail to realize that the Prius is a Series-Parallel hybrid, not just parallel, and it sounds like you fall into that category. At low speed operation, the Prius is a series hybrid. At high speed operation, it acts as a parallel hybrid. This allows the vehicle to be able to actively split the load on MG2, MG1, the engine, and the battery at high speeds, instead of just running the battery dry, and then motoring on generator power until you can either plug in again, or charge the battery enough to shut it off, as you would in a pure series hybrid.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Well, let's not turn this into a monocoque measuring contest. ( Dan will win )
        • 5 Years Ago
        what mechanical leg??
        instead of a long guessing game, just state your point.
        and no it's not a differential. it's an electric motor speed controlled CVT with electric motor assist. quite clever but only for the prius type operation. not for plugin high speed operation in which a series config is incomparably better. just as I said to begin with. and what a fucking surprise, I was always right.

        its fundamental flaw is that it has no way to let the electric motor drive the car alone efficienctly. that cannot be so fucking hard to understand.
        the 3 parts are mechanically coupled as this shows: http://eahart.com/prius/psd/ and to run as battery electric the second electric motor has to spin really fast to allow the first to drive the wheels without driving the ICE too. come on people!!
        • 5 Years Ago
        NiMH was probably chosen because it was far less costlier than Lithium at the time. Lithium was also questionable in the mid 2000's as most people hadn't figured out battery management yet. Thus, you heard a lot about newfangled lithium batteries exploding in laptops and other gadgets.

        Fiberglass has been around since the 1940's and nobody has used it in cars to my knowledge. Let it go, Dan!!!

        As pikachu said, you're not an engineer, so don't come on here and talk like you are one. Nobody is believing it. Being the most arrogant person on here and not backing up anything you say with proof doesn't help your case.
        • 5 Years Ago
        neptronix, I'm a computer scientist and I've studied physics at the university. and I've self studied more than adequate engineering knowledge for the topic at hand. unlike you and pikachu : )

        if you follow the link I gave and study it a bit you can actually come to understand why I am right. it's not that hard. the more you learn the easier you will understand things.
        how I do it.

        the prius configuration is actually surprisingly clever but ONLY for the prius configuration. doesn't work for high speed battery drive. also why the press release says it can't go faster than 60mph in electric mode.. :)
        • 5 Years Ago
        the aptera is all fiber glass. the solectria sunrise was all fiber glass. in general cars whose designers actually thought about energy efficiency use fiber glass..
        but what do we know.. : )

        the reason it's not used in cars is that car makers are not forward thinkers. you know, like how we have to move them kicking and screaming into making EVs.
        • 5 Years Ago
        see response
        • 5 Years Ago
        @pikachu8

        I wish I could vote you up 1,000 times. Comment of the day!
        • 5 Years Ago
        How does being a computer scientist does not make you knowledgeable about cars?

        Modifying gear ratios will change the maximum speed of a car. Toyota designed the transmission and thus they can change the ratios. it is not a design limitation! I looked over the article by the way.

        Still waiting for your proof of why the only solution is for Toyota to scrap their entire transmission and copy the Chevy Volt.

        Looks like you just googled something wordy to help make yourself look like you know what you're talking about.
        • 5 Years Ago
        The solectria sunrise was never produced and the aptera looks like vaporware more and more every day, so those are really bad examples.

        Yeah i misread rotations per second. Usually we are talking RPM on here. Sometimes the blinders go on when your posts are more arrogant than usual. I don't think anyone here would blame me.

        Anyway it still doesn't make sense as to why re-gearing their transmission/powersplit device won't work. I'm tired of arguing with you on this for now. Good job ;P
        • 5 Years Ago
        Dan

        If you lock (i.e., prevent from rotating) the mechanical leg of the power path in the HSD, what have you got?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Jason, a good engineer doesn't need to build something to know its merit. I know. and I am right. Engineering is not a gamble if something will work. it can be worked out with great accuracy in theory without ever building something.
        don't hate my beautiful mind Jason. join me instead. truth is all powerful and only a fool stands against it. search your feelings, you know it to be true.
        • 5 Years Ago
        3 separate battery packs, only 13 miles battery range and still limited to 60mph. just maybe I am actually right : )
        premise and all.
      • 5 Years Ago
      A parallel plug-in hybrid is an evolutionary dead end. It retains the worst characteristics of both forms of propulsion: the space requirements of an IC drivetrain, and the cost and space requirements of battery/electric propulsion. There are no economies of form such as are possible with a serial hybrid.

      The fact that serial hybrids like the Volt and Leaf still look like IC cars is a result of manufacturing inertia and fear of creating an oddball shape consumers won't accept. However, serial technology allows for greater simplification, downsizing and cost reduction.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Prius is not a parallel hybrid. It is a split hybrid which has advantages of series and parallel hybrid. It is a hybrid of hybrids so to speak.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Fred, the Leaf is a pure EV, no ICE, limited to 100 miles per charge.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "There are no economies of form such as are possible with a serial hybrid. ... simplification, downsizing and cost reduction."

        Such as? Surely parallel and serial have the same parts, both have an engine that needs air intake, cooling and exhaust.

        Parallel lets you have a smaller motor, as the engine can contribute. You still want a motor strong enough to drive around EV only (as Autoblog Green did in its quick spin).
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