• Apr 13, 2010
We reported just a couple of weeks ago that the replica Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder – built atop an MG for use in the cult classic Ferris Bueller's Day Off – was heading to the auction block. But with the auction fast approaching, the man who played Ferris has publicly discouraged anyone from actually buying the replicar in question.

The remarks were made by Matthew Broderick – the actor put on the map by his lead role in Ferris – at the debut for The Addams Family, a remake of another classic, starring his longtime friend Nathan Lane. Speaking with journalists from the red carpet, Broderick recalled that the car "often didn't start" when they were filming and characterized it as "unreliable". If you say so, Ferris, but that's hardly cause to drive out through a glass wall and into the ravine below. Thanks for the tip, POV!

[Source: New York magazine]


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  • 17 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      Yes! Now I don't have to rob a bank!
      • 4 Years Ago
      Anyone who purchases a movie prop and expects it to function perfectly is ignorant. Props are for looks and nothing more.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yes, because the driving prop is cobbled together from whatever pieces deemed necessary to achieve the look that was ordered by production. It may work but not as reliably as a real production vehicle. Think show car...
      • 4 Years Ago
      Probably because he wants to buy it himself.
      • 4 Years Ago
      A MG that didn't start? Blasphemy!

      I think the real culprit is that immobilizer they installed. Lucas is the brand, IIRC.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Ferris didn't drive it through the glass wall - unless, of course, you subscribe to the Ferris Bueller/Tyler Durden theory.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I subscribe to the "How the hell did CAM become the captain of the Enterprise B??" theory.
      • 4 Years Ago
      It's an MG. As fun as they were to drive, their reliability was spotty at best.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am sure who ever has had this car over the past 25 years has had the bugs worked out.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The Ferris Bueller "Ferrari" was NOT an MG, unless you're referring to the taillights. It was a custom-built tube chassis with a Ford V8, and a fiberglass body with Fiat 124 Spyder door innards and top. See here for the kit used:

      http://www.calspyderii.com/Welcome.html
        • 4 Years Ago
        Doubtful. There were two replicas in the movie, as well as a REAL Ferrari 250 used for close-up shots that was never driven. The second replica was the one tossed out the window, and that car had a metal hood so that when Cameron kicks it, the hood would dent.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Maybe there was more then one? Maybe the destroyed car was the one you were talking about?
        • 4 Years Ago
        No way that is an MG.

        No MG, not even a B was that big of a car.

        Neither cars were authentic Ferraris. Real 250 GT California roadsters look a bit more blunt, and less sleek than that kit, with different headlight buckets, and a different hood and hood scoop.

        That said, the kit car looked good. I actually like the sleeker nose, a bit more like the 330 GTB-4, or the 250LM's front end.

        The shot of the car coming into frame OVER the camera, to the main fanfare of the Star Wars Theme is absolutely classic. John Hughes, you are missed. RIP.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The house was recently for sale. Fabulous neighborhood, east coast money, even though a couple blocks from the lake. Closer is more expensive yet. On the lake are numerous mansions, including Mr. T's and Michael Jordan's. Million+ dollar homes are taken down to put up multi-million dollar ones. As the lake never freezes (unlike Erie, which does), it's a little warmer in winter, and certainly cooler in summer.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Many times during filming of a "driving" scene, the vehicle in question is parked atop a low flat vehicle trailer for stability and the need for the actors to concentrate on their lines and not the road. The scenes are usually shot "tight" to focus more on the actors and to not see the wheels NOT rolling (or it actually being on the trailer). When the scenes are shot long to show the full car in motion, it's B-roll and edited with voiceover if necessary.
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