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When the time comes to change your vehicle's oil, walk into any major store and you'll find dozens of brands. How do you know which to choose?

AOL Autos has teamed up with AutoZone to bring you a series of DIY car maintenance tips and tricks, straight from our garage to yours.

The DIY Garage video series covers common questions like how to change your own oil, or what the source of that pesky puddle on your garage floor might be. Host and AOL Autos Editor-at-Large Rex Roy will explain everything in plain English and is sure to have some fun along the way.

Look for a new video every week @ http://autos.aol.com/auto-repair.



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  • 86 Comments
      Gary
      • 1 Month Ago
      You can use a full synthetic oil and change your oil at 10,000 miles, these people that say 5,000 or 3,000 just want you to buy more oil. Most GM cars now have computers that monitor oil life. Most of them will tell you to change the oil around 8,000 to 10,000 miles, depending on your driving habits. Of course if you have a clunker, you may want to change it more often.
      • 1 Month Ago
      Piss off ericadams
      allprodale
      • 1 Month Ago
      SHELL ROTELLA IS BEST FOR MY MONEY
      Jethro
      • 1 Month Ago
      MY PAPPY ALWAYS SAID "USE PENNZOIL 10W-40 DAMMIT" BEST OIL AROUND MADE FROM PURE PENNSYLVANIA STOCK. MY PAPPY IS RITE!
      dich123
      • 1 Month Ago
      I tend to go too long on oil changes - 7,000 or more. My 92 escort went from 154,000 miles to 315,000 and the engine was still good. My 94 Escort went from 138,000 to 216,000 miles and still going strong - using very little oil. Sometimes I went 19,000 between changes. I used Valvoline 10W-30 for all. I heard that consumer reports did a study and found that 5,000 miles was fine. About Suzukidavis's overheating problem - temporary fixes - turn off the A/C, open the windows, and maybe turn on the heater and fan. The heater is actually another radiator that can help cool your engine. Watch your temperature guage (if you have one) to see how much of that you need to do. If you're stopped in traffic, turn off your engine if it can start reliably. Start it quickly enough to move when you need to. Don't start it too much or you may overheat and kill the starter motor. If you have a stick you can turn off the engine when you're moving and restart it with the starter motor or with the clutch. While driving at speed you can stop the engine, use neutral or clutch to disengage the engine, coast for a while, and restart the engine. I think most automatic transmissions will get damaged moving in neutral, so this is mostly for sticks. This will reduce heat because the engine will be off much of the time. Your speed will be varying up and down, so this is not so good in traffic. This has gotten me home with all my antifreeze gone from a leak.
      • 1 Month Ago
      szukidavis Apr 06, 2010 7:51 PM HELP! All you guys seems to know cars and I am having a horrid problem that even my mechanic can't figure out. I have a 93 Volvo wagon and when I am driving in traffic, stop and go or idyling with the A/C on, the car overheats. They checked everything...thermostat, put a new sensor in, the belts, etc. The mechanic says that the only thing left is the radiator but usually when the radiator is the problem, it happens when cruising, not when it is stop and go or idyling...so he can't be sure..to the tune of a lot of MY money he suggests a new radiator. I am hesitating because he said that M.O. isn't that of a bad radiator..so if it's not the radiator, I will be out several hundred dollars and still no solution. I already spent $200 for them to explore options and with no resolution. Does anyone have a clue to share? HELP! tell your guy to make sure your heater core is not cloged it happens trust me. had it happen to my town and country van luckyly i have two master meachanics as neighbors and got it done in one swipe
      • 1 Month Ago
      I'll stick with Mobil One or Shell. The rest of the "never had an engine failure (how do you prove THAT)" stuff made in somebody's garage in 55 gallon drums I'll pass on. Up here in the frozen north, BJ's Club sells Shell syn for a VERY good price. I understand the new Castrol is also a good product but have not tried it. I do have 250 K on a Camry using Mobil One, not Amway Oli or whatever it is called.
      Erbie's
      • 1 Month Ago
      Good article, but leaves a lot of necessary information out. When he says all you need to see is the api certification making it good in any gasoline engine, Why then will not even Mobil, tell you it is acceptable to use Mobil 1 in your motorcycle, there are a lot of codes on the side of a bottle of oil, is this just useless information put there to scare the consumer into buying something more expensive. Even AutoZone carries motorcycle oil. Secondly, he got into the cold weather weight of the oil, the first number of the multi-viscostiy oil, but never mentioned the second number, the "hot number".
      DavidB
      • 1 Month Ago
      spl31166, The term "Full Synthetic" does not mean it's 100% Synthetic. It could still be & usually is a "blend". (And that comes from one of the aol Mechanics on another thread).
      DavidB
      • 1 Month Ago
      Everyone, I was in error! On my post of Apr 06, 2010 @ 9:52AM, I stated that all AMSOIL Oils are API certified. This is NOT correct. I apologize to labellefille1 & everyone on this thread! (No-one is perfect, including me). However, please know that my error was NOT intentional, I have never & will never intentionally mis-represent, lie or or otherwise make false statements about AMSOIL products or any product(s) AMSOIL Inc. markets. My thanks to the other AMSOIL Dealers who were kind enough to contact me concerning my error. Please be assured that I will endeavor to double check my information & post only 100% accurate info. from now on.
      gr8bsn
      • 1 Month Ago
      My 1994 Ford Explorer (work truck) uses regular oil and still runs strong with 166K. I'm thinking about making the switch to synthetic in my 2008 Pontiac. It's only got 36K and a lot more live to live, so I want to get the most out of it. I used to run Castrol Syntec (or however you spell it) in my old Motorcycle and picked up about 1-2 mpg with freeway riding. I'm hoping that the fuel savings would pay off with my car.
      Gordo
      • 1 Month Ago
      Use full synthetics and change every 10,000 miles (Rated for 15,000 miles) with Mobil 1 full synthetic. I change everytime the auto odometer rolls over the next 10,000 miles. For new car "breakin" I leave in the original oil for 1000 miles then do the first full synthetic change at 10,000 miles, then begin regular changes at 20,000, 30,000. 40,000 etc. Has worked well for me for 20 years. Beats the cost and bother of "change your oil every 3000 miles". Even most car manuals say every 7500 miles and the recommended oil for most in non-synthetic.
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