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It's official: starting this December, Nissan dealerships in select U.S markets will start selling the all-electric Leaf, the first mass-produced, zero-emission vehicle, at a starting price of $32,780. After $7,500 worth of federal tax credits, the price should drop to as low as $25,280. There are several states offering additional tax credits that could lower the cost of owning a Leaf even more – such as a $5,000 statewide tax rebate in California, a $5,000 tax credit in Georgia and a $1,500 tax credit in Oregon.

Nissan also announced a lease program for the Leaf that will put you in the drivers seat for $349 a month for three years.

Earlier today, Nissan announced pricing for the Leaf in Japan. Base price will be ¥3.76 million (roughly $40,700 USD) before any tax breaks. With the current ¥770,000 EV incentive in Japan, that price will drop to a bit over $33,000.

So why are the Leafs (Leaves?) more expensive in their home country than they are in America? The simple answer is that Nissan wants the Leaf to be competitive.

Additionally, Nissan will offer personal charging docks, which operate on a 220-volt supply. Nissan is providing these home-charging stations as part of a one-stop-shop process that includes a home assessment by a certified technician to ensure that your garage is plug-in ready. The average cost for the charging dock plus installation will be $2,200. But charging docks and installation are eligible for a 50% federal tax credit up to $2,000. So after the tax credit, the average cost for the charging dock would be $1100.

Starting April 20, interested customers who have signed up at nissanusa.com can put down a refundable $99 reservation fee. Official ordering doesn't start until August with deliveries scheduled to start in December. The Leaf goes on sale nationwide by the end of 2011. See the official press release after the break.



[Source: Nissan]

PRESS RELEASE

NISSAN DELIVERS AFFORDABLE SOLUTIONS FOR PURCHASE, LEASE OF ALL-ELECTRIC NISSAN LEAF


As low as $25,280 ($32,780 MSRP minus up to $7,500 federal tax credit)

Lease world's first mass-marketed EV for $349 per month

FRANKLIN, Tenn. (March 30, 2010) – Nissan North America, Inc. (NNA) today announced U.S. pricing for the 2011 Nissan LEAF electric vehicle, which becomes available for purchase or lease at Nissan dealers in select markets in December and nationwide in 2011. Nissan will begin taking consumer reservations for the Nissan LEAF April 20.

Including the $7,500 federal tax credit for which the Nissan LEAF will be fully eligible, the consumer's after-tax net value of the vehicle will be $25,280. The Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price *(MSRP) for the 2011 all-electric, zero-emission Nissan LEAF is $32,780, which includes three years of roadside assistance. Additionally, there is an array of state and local incentives that may further defray the costs and increase the benefits of owning and charging a Nissan LEAF – such as a $5,000 statewide tax rebate in California; a $5,000 tax credit in Georgia; a $1,500 tax credit in Oregon; and carpool-lane access in some states, including California.

As a result of aggressive pricing and the availability of the $7,500 federal tax credit whose benefit is immediately included, Nissan will be able to offer a monthly lease payment beginning at $349, not including state or local incentives, which could further reduce the net cost of the Nissan LEAF.

"Imagine the possibility of never needing to go to a gas station again. Or of paying less than $3 for 100 miles behind the wheel. Or of creating zero emissions while driving," said Brian Carolin, senior vice president, Sales and Marketing, NNA. "Nissan leads the industry by offering the first affordable, zero-emission vehicle for the mass market. Nissan LEAF truly is in a class by itself."

The vehicle at the SV trim level is well-equipped with a variety of standard features, including an advanced navigation system and Internet/smart phone connectivity to the vehicle, enabling pre-heat/pre-cool and charging control. Nissan LEAF is equipped with energy-efficient LED headlights and makes extensive use of recycled and recyclable materials, such as seat fabric, instrument panel materials, and front- and rear-bumper fascias. Other standard amenities include Bluetooth connectivity; Intelligent-key with push button start; Sirius/XM satellite radio capabilities and roadside assistance. Safety features include vehicle dynamic control (stability control), traction control and six airbags. The SL trim level, available for an additional $940 (MSRP), adds features including rearview monitor, solar panel spoiler, fog lights, and automatic headlights.

Reservations and Purchase

In order to ensure a one-stop-shop customer experience, Nissan is carefully managing the purchase process from the first step, when consumers sign up on NissanUSA.com, until the customer takes the Nissan LEAF home and plugs it into a personal charging dock.

• Nissan begins accepting reservations on April 20 first from people who have signed up on NissanUSA.com, and, after a brief introductory period, to all interested consumers.
• Consumers will be required to pay a $99 reservation fee, which is fully refundable.
• Reserving a Nissan LEAF ensures consumers a place in line when Nissan begins taking firm orders in August, as well as access to special, upcoming Nissan LEAF events.
• Rollout to select markets begins in December, with nationwide availability in 2011.

Charging Equipment

In tandem with the purchase process, Nissan will offer personal charging docks, which operate on a 220-volt supply, as well as their installation. Nissan is providing these home-charging stations, which will be built and installed by AeroVironment, as part of a one-stop-shop process that includes a home assessment.

• The average cost for the charging dock plus installation will be $2,200.
• Charging dock and installation are eligible for a 50 percent federal tax credit up to $2,000.
Using current national electricity averages, Nissan LEAF will cost less than $3 to "fill up."
• Nissan LEAF also will be the sole vehicle available as part of The EV Project, which is led by EV infrastructure provider eTec, a division of ECOtality, and will provide free home-charging stations and installation for up to 4,700 Nissan LEAF owners in those markets.

In North America, Nissan's operations include automotive design, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program 2010, whose key priorities are reducing CO2 emissions, cutting other emissions and increasing recycling. More information on the Nissan LEAF and zero emissions can be found at www.NissanUsa.com.

MSRP excludes applicable tax, title and license fees. Dealer sets actual price. Prices and specs are subject to change without notice
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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 140 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      LOL, it's a good thing no one seems to understand how a tax credit works. The $7500 is NOT subtracted from the price. If it were, it would be some kind of sham government rebate.

      They rely on you believing this hoax. The dollar amount ends up being 1/4 of that subtracted from your federal taxes if you're say, paying 25% of your income in taxes.



      • 4 Years Ago
      They are going to build the cars and the batteries in Tennessee.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is a fantastic price. Nissan will own virtually all the EV market in the US.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Folks, don't get to excited about the quoted range. Can someone take the Leaf down a highway at 65mph for 100 miles? That brammo enertia motorcycle can only do 20 miles on the highway, 50% of it's quoted range.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I didn't jump to a conclusion. I was only being skeptical.

        But I do see your point. Nissan is putting their reputation on the line and I do have a little more confidence in their numbers. However, I wouldn't buy until I see real world testing from actual users.
        • 4 Years Ago
        No, you can't go 100 miles @ 65mph. 100 Mile range is using a standard city cycle - so if you are driving in the city at a low speed you will get about 100 miles.

        Take a look at the below. The range goes down heavily as the mph goes up. Infact, we can save a lot of oil by cutting down the maximum speed limit - infact that would be the cheapest way to save oil (and cut emissions).

        http://www.teslamotors.com/blog4/?p=70
        • 4 Years Ago
        Remember how Nissan said that the GTR would make 480hp (which it does at the wheels) and go 0-60 in less than 5 seconds (which it does by a second and a half)?

        I wouldn't jump to conclusions that Nissan (which has a reputation of being conservative with their specs) is being optimistic with their numbers because other, less reputable companies exageratted.
        • 4 Years Ago
        There may be some confusion when it comes to the US market and the actual mileage experience.

        People are generally used to having MORE highway miles than city miles.

        So folks in the city generally (and automatically) take a few MPG off the EPA claims. While folks who drive mostly on the highway (and not at ludicrous speed) will take the EPA number at face value.

        For EVs, this can be reversed. Since regen braking almosts eliminates the city MPG penalty, the city EPA MPG would be greater while leaving the highway MPG alone. And quite often highway MPG is now the LOW number. So that makes the reported "combined" MPG estimate higher than the highway cycle MPG.

        So highway riders must now take a few MPG off the EPA claims. And city dwellers can take the estimates more at face value.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Thanks for the link evnow, that was good
      • 4 Years Ago
      Holy effin' crap!! that's dirt for an electric car! Here i was thinking it'd be $32k AFTER incentives. Wow. i'm utterly shocked.

      Sucks for Japan though... :p
      ( then again an electric makes a hell of a lot more financial sense out there )
        • 4 Years Ago
        Remember, they get the jobs.
        They get the employment multiplier effect, of money flowing through their economy.
        They take the market share,
        they control future R&D,
        they then control price and take a monopoly position.

        Only a fool would "settle" to be the purchasing country.
        You can thank Crackpot Milton Friedman for justifying moving US Jobs to Foreign Countries, and being non-competitive.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yep.. they took the risk and now they reap whatever benefits are gonna come.
        America obviously wasn't willing to do it. And it's not a money problem since Japan's been in a recession forever now, longer and deeper than ours.

        You can't just say Nissan has a monopoly already. This is the first mass-produced electric car, for chrissake.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Also, what happened to Nissan supposedly charging to lease the battery pack?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Nissan nixed the cheaper car ($19000 was the goal I think) and lease the battery idea because the arrangement would not qualify the customer for the $7500 tax credit.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This is great for Nissan and Japan.

      This is Another technology the US Loses.
      This is generations of jobs lost to America.
      Japan pays a higher price, but gets GENERATIONS of jobs, primary, secondary, ...
      Japan gets the Multiplier Effect of job creation.
      They laughing all the way to the bank.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Haha, yes, I guess so.
        Still the R&D is in Japan along with the profits.
        But, it's not as bad as I thought.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Except all the US jobs when they build them as planned in the US plant next year. The entire US loses premise is a bunch of BS and most cars are made in the US now. Even it was entirely made in Japan (but it won't be) I would still buy it as US automakers are to blame for their own greed and stupidity. I don't recall Nissan needing a bailout to keep US factories running.
        • 4 Years Ago
        It's our damn fault too.
        • 4 Years Ago
        They are going to build the cars and the batteries in Tennessee.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I have to respectfully disagree on this one.

        While Nissan will own the EV market initially, GM will probably own the EREV market (which is arguably much larger) initially, although they better get production numbers up alot higher than they were planning - what happens after that is still way up in the air.

        The people that have to be sweating bullets though is Honda, Ford, Chrysler and Mazda - they don't have true (from the ground up) EV designs ready to go and it looks like Nissan wants to Prius the EV market and leave them all picking up the scraps. Aptera should be scared out of their minds.

        • 4 Years Ago
        You could be right.

        I wonder if this Leaf car will make GM look even more stupid for ditching the EV1.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I believed you just got served, sir.
      • 4 Years Ago
      This really is a great price and quite a challenge to competitors.

      Coda basically has no chance.

      Mitsubishi will have to lower the price of the iMiEV since the Leaf appears to be more car for less money.

      Tesla will really have to work hard to differentiate the Model S as up-market, reliable, and better performing to justify it's (now) high price and (by then) late entry into the market.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Yeah. REALLY sucks for the small guys.

        But wouldn't you rather see our tax dollars go to a company that can readily produce and support large scale manufacturing of electric cars @ a price most people can afford?

        I mean, we've thrown money at so many failures.. or companies that keep delaying..delaying..delaying..
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Doug: You speak the truth... There are a lot of companies who are working on electric cars out there at the moment, Coda, Aptera, BYD, etc. etc. Somehow I think the air got a lot thinner and the climb a lot steeper today... especially for the independants. As for the the iMiev, I can't see how Mitsu will be able to sell what looks to be an inferior car for more $ than the Leaf.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Totally agree. Plus, don't forget about GM Volt 40-miles EV. There is no way they can beat that price with all the additional components required by an Hybrid. Then again, the Volt will attract a different high-mileage green clientele.

      • 4 Years Ago
      "So why are the Leafs (Leaves?) more expensive in their home country than they are in America? The simple answer is that Nissan wants the Leaf to be competitive." Does that make any sense at all?

      Since Nissan has publicly floated different ways of marketing the Leaf including a plan that separates the battery into a lease separate from the car, listing a price without noting that the battery is included is meaningless.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Wincross,
        Let me get this straight. They supplied the price of an outright lease ($348 a month) and this much detail as to what you get for your money:
        "Nissan LEAF is equipped with energy-efficient LED headlights and makes extensive use of recycled and recyclable materials, such as seat fabric, instrument panel materials, and front- and rear-bumper fascias. Other standard amenities include Bluetooth connectivity; Intelligent-key with push button start; Sirius/XM satellite radio capabilities and roadside assistance. Safety features include vehicle dynamic control (stability control), traction control and six airbags. The SL trim level, available for an additional $940 (MSRP), adds features including rearview monitor, solar panel spoiler, fog lights, and automatic headlights"

        And yet forgot to mention that you had to lease the battery pack as a separate charge?

        Dude, you are incredibly cynical.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Ah, Spence. You think you are being given a free lunch. Tsk.

        Price in Japan: About $40,700 USD
        Price in US: $32,780

        Difference: $ 7,920

        Strangely the difference is about the price of a battery.

        What Nissan was reported to have said 6 months ago:

        But the real trick is that the batteries won't be part of the selling price: Nissan's global approach will be to sell the car, but lease the battery pack.

        The argument for leasing is that if you buy a gasoline car, the gasoline isn't part of the deal, and the battery pack in an EV (plus the electricity that it stores) can be likened to the gas needed to make a conventional car go.

        • 4 Years Ago
        The original plan was to lease the battery. They later scrapped that plan. The battery is included in the sale price.

        How did so many people miss this second announcement?

        They wanted the Leaf to be more competitive in the US market, so they priced it lower to boost sales. And I bet it will work.
        • 4 Years Ago
        There is no differential pricing between Japan and the US with other Japanese cars. There is no reason Nissan would not want to compete with the Prius and Insight in Japan as well as in the US. If they could price the Leaf to compete in Japan they would. They can't dump them below cost in the US. So something has to be missing. There is no free lunch.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Smells like dumping to me. Isn't that supposed to be illegal?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Nissan: Here's a hundred bucks.
        Wincros: This bill is wrinkled! And they aren't called "bucks", they are called dollars! And Benjamin Franklin was a whoremonger!
        Nissan: You're welcome.
        • 4 Years Ago
        wincros, so you say that $7900 is the price of the Leaf's 24kWh battery? That's pretty good!

        Less than $300 per kWh! A new battery price breakthrough!

        Too bad you're so frikkin wrong on everything you said.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Here's a crazy idea: Perhaps Japanese buyers are willing to pay more for an electric because gas costs at least twice what it does in the US.

        By the way, have we heard anything about Canadian pricing? I know they'll be releasing it out here in Vancouver at least. Canadian pricing on cars is usually much different than in the states.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Call me suspicious... where does it say this includes the battery?
        • 4 Years Ago
        They also don't say it includes the wheels either :-) The Nissan press release breaks down the price of the reservation, the charging unit, the lease, and even the additional trim package. They would be shooting themselves in the foot to have all this detail and then to say "oh... by the way, we need another $10,000 for you for the batteries"
      • 4 Years Ago
      I knew the stories about it costing $40K and not including batteries had to be complete hogwash.

      Good on Nissan. This is very reasonable pricing.

      I would really get this ahead of the Volt any day. With ~100mile range you have much less need for a range extender.

      Also consider that most families have more than one car, they can use the other for vacation road trips, or rent if it is your only car.

      Less expensive, longer battery range and no ICE components to service.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Oh come on neptronix....it's so ugly it's cute! :-)
        • 4 Years Ago
        I didn't, i'm surprised. Every other electric car we've seen with this kind of range has been notably more expensive.

        Should be interesting to see how the Volt does in comparison. I still think the Volt is more practical and thus people in cold-weather or very spread out states will be more apt to buy it over this.

        ( plus the Leaf looks pretty dorky and it seems like some just can't get over it's looks yet.. )
        • 4 Years Ago
        Dave D: like a pug? :p

        I think it's got a weird butt, but i'd buy it if i had the $$.
        Wish i was gainfully employed right now ....... grrrr
      • 4 Years Ago
      How does the Federal Tax Credit work? Does the dealer take it off the selling price of the car at the time of sale, or do you pay the full amount and then file with the gov?
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