The Los Angeles Times scoured public records and discovered that the number of deaths possibly linked to Toyota's unintended acceleration issue could top more than 100 – twice the amount previously reported earlier this year.

With recalled vehicles reaching record numbers, complaints have poured in to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and the number of reported accidents involving sudden acceleration have increased accordingly. A review of police reports, lawsuits and NHTSA filings have revealed that sudden, unintended acceleration could be a possible cause of death in as many as 102 cases.

The rise in possible deaths related to sudden acceleration has led to a thorough evaluation of each and every fatality reported involving a recalled Toyota vehicle. All accidents involving recalled vehicles, and in particular cases that involve a fatality, will be investigated by the feds, and the government's final report should finally solidify the gruesome numbers.

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[Source: Los Angeles Times]

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